2009 Cal24 Rally - K-Bikes.com - Excellence in Motion
 
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post #1 of 8 (permalink) Old Jun 20th, 2009, 12:14 am Thread Starter
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2009 Cal24 Rally

Prologue and Preparation

The Cal24 Motorcycle Rally is an Endurance Rally based, obviously enough, in California. The goal is to ride a minimum of 1,000 miles over a 24-hour period, collecting various bonuses along the way. Think of it as a big scavenger hunt on motorcycles.

I entered the Cal24 for the first time in 2006 as my first 24-hour Rally and managed a respectable 13th place finish while traversing some of the best and twistiest roads that this state has to offer. I entered again in 2007, and while the Rally itself was much harder, the roads again were awesome and I had a blast. And managed a 3rd place finish along the way.

I was unable to enter in 2008, so I was really looking forward to the 2009 Cal24. Great roads, great friends, and challenging yourself to find your personal best - what could be a better way to spend a weekend?

Due to various work and home commitments, I was unable to sign up when it was first announced. I managed to clear my schedule about a month before the Rally, so I signed up. Better late than not at all.

The week before the Rally, I realized that 1) I needed tires and 2) I needed to refit my auxiliary fuel cell. And worst of all, 3) both of my GPS units were non-functional. Now you can survive an Endurance Rally with no GPS (in fact, I did just that at this year's Spank Rally), and you don't really need auxiliary fuel, but both of those items help tremendously when your pushing to find some obscure historical plaque or random point of interest in some tiny little town, and you know that the clock is ticking and every minute counts.

But tires are crucial, as you can't finish a 1,000-mile Rally if you're sitting on the side of the road with your tires on the cords. So I ordered a fresh pair of Avon Storms, which work very well for me on the GT. Those arrived on Tuesday before the Rally, so I pulled the rims off and had the tires changed out at a local multi-brand cycle shop.

While I was waiting, a nice couple came in to get their bikes serviced for a Border to Border ride. They would start in Mexico, run up through Sedona and the Grand Canyon, and meander through Utah and Idaho towards Vancouver, BC, before heading home along the coast the whole way. They had planned 2 weeks for this trip and were obviously really looking forward to it. I mentioned that I had also done a Border to Border straight up I-5, taking 21 hours to cover the 1,468 miles. They both stared at me for a minute, then simply turned away. Some folks just don't get it.

I got the tires mounted okay, but had to put the bike away for a while due to other commitments. Hmm, what to do about the GPS? Both were basically non-functional, one with a dead hard disk, and one with a dead touch screen. A quick scavenge for a T-8 screwdriver had them both apart, and the "working" hard disk went into the "working" touch screen. Hey, it worked! So GPS solved.

I got back to the bike on Thursday and spent the day removing the passenger seat and mounting the aux fuel cell. There are probably way too many brackets and screws, but that fuel cell sure is mounted solid.

I'd also been fighting with my flip-up tank bag. It's designed to flip forward, but that interferes with my handlebar risers so it doesn't go up very far. Add that to a gas cap that flips backwards, and those stupid California emissions nozzles and it's way more trouble to refuel than it ought to be. So the tank bag bracket got reversed, the tank bag modified, and the gas cap removed and its mount also modified so it could be reversed. Plus I was able to install a non-locking gas cap cylinder that a friend had designed, so now I can refuel quickly without needing to pull my key from the ignition or fight with my tank bag. Every minute counts.

At one point well after dark, my wife Dayle comes out to the garage, chuckles at me, then heads back into the house. Sheís seen this sort of last-minute-mayhem before. Add routing my 3-liter water bottle lines and a bit of other cleanup and suddenly it's midnight. And I have to be in San Jose tomorrow, well before 6 p.m. for tech inspection and the odometer mileage check.

After a good but too-brief night's sleep, I'm up, the bike is packed, and I'm off. I'm not looking forward to the 350-mile drone up the interstate to San Jose but heck, I'm on the road early enough that I have time to take the twisty CA-33 instead. Which just happens to run by Rocky Mayer's place, where a friend is getting his seat reworked that very morning. So I take a small detour, and have a nice chat with David and Rocky for about an hour. An hour already! I gotta go.

I found out later that Rocky had generously donated a gift certificate for one of his custom seats to the Cal24. Susan had seen me talking, and when Tom (the Cal24 President) called she said "Ken's here. I'll just give him the gift certificate to deliver." Tom's response was "Ken's still in Ojai? Tell him to get on the road now!" But I was already gone, and so didn't hear about that little conversation until later.

At this point, I've done everything wrong. No major modifications to the bike just before a ride. Get a good night's sleep so you're refreshed. Get to the check-in early so there's time to relax, and time for any last-minute adjustments or to pick up anything you may have forgotten. But it is what it is, and there's no time to dwell on such things.

The trip north was uneventful, and gave me the chance to scrub in the new Avons on CA-33, one of my Favorite Roads Everô. I-5 was moving nicely and traffic through Gilroy and the South Bay wasn't bad for a Friday afternoon, which is to say it was very dense, but moving briskly. Hmm, starting and ending an Endurance Rally in a densely populated mega-suburbia will be an interesting change . . .

Soon enough I arrived at the hotel, paying special attention to the local on ramps, off ramps, and surface streets. You never know when that last stop light will throw you off by a precious minute or two, when there is a stop-signed back road as an alternative merely a block away.

I recognized many of the bikes and even a few of the riders and made my way to the check-in table. The Cal24 is one of the longest running Rallies, and they have amassed a great crew that knows how to keep things humming along. They had also thoughtfully provided a table full of road snacks and beverages that the riders could take from freely. A couple bottles of sports drink and a few granola bars topped off my on-bike buffet nicely. And of course, a cookie or two never hurts.

Check-in and tech inspection went smoothly (good tires - check, working lights - check, flashlight - check, tire repair kit and pump - check, first aid kit - check). My trip meters (bike and GPS) were zeroed and my mileage was recorded, and I was handed a sheet of instructions for the mandatory odometer check. This is basically a known route with a fixed distance that the Rally Masters use to compare your recorded mileage with their golden mileage. From that, a correction factor can be determined for each bike that takes into account different tire sizes and various other odometer errors.

In the hour that had passed the traffic had gotten noticeably worse, but I grew up riding a bike through L.A. so this was old hat. And it gave me another chance to get familiar with the local freeways. You never know which way you'll be heading out at the start of a Rally, or which way (and how quickly) you'll be heading back in.

Another thing we had to accomplish was to decorate our Rally Flags. They had provided us with basic white hand towels and colored markers. Our Rally Number had to be visible, even in the dark via the camera's flash, with whatever it was that we were supposed to be capturing clearly visible, too. So you want to make the numbers big. And colorful.



At this point, astute readers may notice the leaking BMW Roundel on my Rally Flag. Those who know me will get the in-joke, but the rest of you will simply have to wait for my 2008 Spank 7-day Rally ride report.

With the odo check and the Rally Flag completed, there was time for tire kicking and general merriment until the rider's meeting. At one point, I heard someone say "There's not a lot of competition here today." I looked around at all the past Iron Butt Rally finishers, those who I knew were running the IBR later this year, and those who had won or placed very well in previous Rallies that I'd ridden and thought "No, there's a ton of Serious Competition here."

I took this time to head out into San Jose to top off the bike's gas tank and fuel cell, and to grab some more road food. Anything you can do "off the clock" the night before saves valuable time once the Rally actually starts. I found the local Subway and ordered three foot-long sandwiches, each cut into thirds. These tend to be quick to eat at a gas stop or bonus location, easy to digest, and a third of a sandwich is usually enough to cover me for several hours. With the tanks full, I returned to the host hotel and parked the bike up for the night.

At 7 p.m. the newbies and the seasoned veterans all gathered around the pool, pens and notepads in hand, hoping to glean some tidbit of crucial information about what we were about to endure.

Sometimes the Rally Packs are handed out the night before and the riders usually stay up half the night, forgoing sleep in a convoluted but vain attempt at finding the perfect route. Not a good idea when you've got to be awake and alert for the next 24 hours . . .

So Mark, our Rally Master, decided to give us the Rally Packs at 5 a.m. the next morning, giving us a scant 2 hours to plan the whole ride before our 7 a.m. departure time. It is possible to stay a bit longer and continue searching for that elusive winning route past the 7 a.m. start time, but then you're cutting into very valuable riding time.

There's a Long Distance maxim that says: "Plan the ride, and ride the plan." The theory being that an extra 30-60 minutes of planning can save you hours of on-road frustration, or can net you bigger and better bonuses with the time that you have. But an hour out of 24 is huge, so I usually come up with a rough plan as quickly as I can, try and get as much detail as possible with the time left, and strive to be on the bike and ready to roll right as the starting flag drops. I'm more of a "Plan the basic ride, then make the rest of it up as you go along" kind of rider.

The evening meeting consisted of the usual explanation of what we're doing for the newbie riders, a review of the basic rules (be safe, make the checkpoints on time [or call in if you can't], don't ride like a Knob, etc.). We were told there were two timed checkpoints along the main route that were both optional. But they were worth big points, because the Rally volunteers really like checking up on each of the riders in person a couple of times during the ride. A lot of things can happen in 24 hours and 1,000+ miles, not all of them good.

With all that covered and nothing else to do before the Rally Packs were handed out at 5 a.m., it was time for a leisurely dinner. I hooked up with a few friends and we decided to stick to the hotel restaurant where more tire kicking and Rally lies were told. It's always good to get a full meal the night before, as you just never know if you'll even have time to stop and eat on a 24-hour Rally. Then it was off to bed, to try and get as much sleep as possible before the Screaming Meanie alarm clock goes off at some ungodly hour.

Ken
Pacific NorthWet
'13 Dark Graphite Metallic K16GTLD, 24K miles and counting...
'09 Magnesium Beige Metallic K13GT, 60K miles miles and counting...
'02 Mauve Metallic K12LTC, 106K miles and sold
BMWLT#145, IBA# 366, MOA# 111996, SCMA# 24032

All lower 48 states plus Alaska on the K13GT in two weeks . . .

Some people see the gas tank as half empty. Some see it as half full. All I care is that I know where the next tankful is coming from...
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post #2 of 8 (permalink) Old Jun 20th, 2009, 12:14 am Thread Starter
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Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Oxnard, CA, USA
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Planning and Panic

Off goes the alarm, and I'm up and through the shower in record time. Mark had said in the previous evening's meeting that we were not to show up at 5 a.m. in our riding clothes. He was making the point that there was still 2 hours between getting our Rally Packs and getting the wheels moving. Good thing I had brought some shorts and a nice shirt with. I did get some ribbing for wearing my shorts over my LDComfort tights and top, but those things keep me warm and comfortable for hours on the bike so I'm not giving them up for anybody. I'm all about the function-over-form.

There were a few last-minute directions, then we all lined up in order of our rider numbers (based on when we had signed up for the Rally) to receive our Rally Packs. There were actually two guys behind me, so I guess I wasn't the biggest procrastinator there.

With Rally Packs in hand, most riders immediately retreated to the sanctuary of their rooms to decipher the great puzzle that we had just been handed. I stayed right there in the parking lot next to the Rally staff and quickly scanned my Rally Pack from cover to cover. Any questions about particular bonuses or checkpoint requirements can be answered right there, rather than trying to find a cell signal on some remote mountaintop while the clock is ticking. I also underlined exactly what each bonus location required as proof of our visit so that I could find it quickly once I reached that bonus. I noticed only one other rider had stayed and read through his entire pack, and that he was definitely in the Serious Competition category. Yeah, this is gonna be fun.

Then it was off to my room to fire up the laptop and try and make sense of it all. Scan the pack again, looking for big-point bonuses and trying to plot them on the AAA map with a Sharpie and highlighter. Hmm, there is actually a huge bonus up in Portland. As in Oregon. That's an awful long way from San Jose on a good day, and a very long ride during a 24-hour Rally. But the single biggest bonus location is usually a sucker bonus, with some sort of catch that makes it damn near impossible to score within the time frame that we're working under. Still, that 9,340 points is awfully tempting so I plot it out in Google Maps and realize that it is possible, but it would leave little time for anything else and pretty much mean that you'd miss both 1,000-point checkpoints. With most bonuses in the 50-200 or maybe 400 point-range, the two checkpoints are very valuable.

There is also an unknown combo bonus somewhere south of San Jose that can only be gotten between 5:00 and 6:00 a.m. It lists 7 "chances" at 400 points each, with no description of what we'd be required to find, or to do. Still, 2,800 possible points is a big draw, as it would be very tough to get that many points in that short a time anywhere else, especially right at the end of the Rally. So that definitely goes on my to-do list.

The other big possibility is a Progressive Thread bonus, which consists of finding and photographing those huge fiberglass men that you often see standing outside a muffler shop or other car repair place. The first bonus is worth a measly 60 points, but the second is worth 120, and the third worth 240, etc. So bagging all 7 possible Threads nets you an impressive 7,620 points. Plus there is a 500-point bonus Thread question (which "Muffler Man" is the only true "Muffler" Man?) for a very tempting 8,120 point base ride. I plot that out and see that it is doable within our 24-hour time window, even accounting for some of the smaller roads that some of those cities are on. Fortunately, every location had an actual street address listed so I knew they'd be pretty easy to find, even at 3:00 a.m. And these can be gotten in any order, as the points are assigned by how many you get rather than being stuck to a specific location.

The downside is that one of them is listed as a "daylight-only" bonus because a nighttime pic would be all but impossible, and for another we're warned that a nighttime pic will be very difficult. So I have to run these in a clockwise order to get the daylight-only pic and hope that I can still get to the other difficult pic before dark, which means I won't be able to get to either of the fixed-time checkpoints. Bummer. Still, if all goes well it does put me back near San Jose early enough to catch the 2,800-point mystery bonus thread. Hopefully. Plus there are a number of easy-to-grab bonuses located near the end of this loop, so maybe I can make up those extra points that I would have gotten from the two checkpoints, or from the interstate drone up to Portland.

So with a rough plan in hand, I use the remaining time to try and plot out other medium-sized bonuses on my map so that I can see if anything else falls naturally into my plan. But there are just too many bonuses and planning time has run out, so I quickly pack up everything, get into my riding gear, stash my laptop and other unnecessary accoutrements in a friend's room, give my key back to the desk clerk, and get out to my bike.

Hmm, it's already 11 minutes past 7:00 and most of the riders are gone, although I do still see a few stragglers with dazed looks on their faces. At least I'm not alone.

Ken
Pacific NorthWet
'13 Dark Graphite Metallic K16GTLD, 24K miles and counting...
'09 Magnesium Beige Metallic K13GT, 60K miles miles and counting...
'02 Mauve Metallic K12LTC, 106K miles and sold
BMWLT#145, IBA# 366, MOA# 111996, SCMA# 24032

All lower 48 states plus Alaska on the K13GT in two weeks . . .

Some people see the gas tank as half empty. Some see it as half full. All I care is that I know where the next tankful is coming from...
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post #3 of 8 (permalink) Old Jun 20th, 2009, 12:15 am Thread Starter
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The Route Not Taken

I get my starting mileage signed out, and roll away. Very quickly I hit the 101 South (scoping those freeway access roads does help). The first Muffler Man is actually in south San Jose, so it's an easy grab. I pass a couple of other riders along the way, and wonder briefly if they're doing the whole thread, too.

I reach the bonus location to find that it's a working muffler shop, and the large fiberglass man is holding an actual muffler.



Or, a slightly different point of view:


(pic taken by Terry Neale, another talented Rally rider)

I wonder briefly if this is the true "Muffler" man referred to in the Thread bonus question, but I figure once I have all the pics I'll compare them and make my choice then. Being the first in my Thread this bonus is only worth 60 points, but it is the basis for my entire ride. I get back to the freeway and head towards the second Muffler Man in Hayward. As I ride past the host hotel again, I note that it is now almost 7:30. My delayed start and this first bonus location took longer than I wanted, in the wrong direction, and that initial 1/2 hour would dog me the whole Rally.

The Hayward Muffler Man is gotten without incident for 120 points this time, although once again there are too many city streets and stoplights for my taste.



But soon enough I'm back on the mostly-empty freeways and heading north. I come across a toll bridge, and have to fumble a bit for cash. $4? Really? I suppose it's a whole lot better than riding the long way around the Bay. I tuck in the lane that everyone's avoiding behind two big rigs and as I'd guessed, they get through quickly and it's my turn. I pay and stuff the change into my handlebar bag, figuring I may well encounter more tolls this day.

After that, it's smooth sailing up the 101 while Led Zeppelin keeps me company. I'm heading to Willits and another Muffler Man. This is the one that's effectively daylight only, and the bonus list says it's down an artery street, across from a museum, and inside the Rodeo Grounds. I skip the main 101 drag through town by taking side-streets and find the location, but don't see the Muffler Man. Up and down the street a couple times and no Muffler Man. Forget nighttime, this one's damn near impossible to find in broad daylight. But finally I spot it, tucked behind a large and imposing fence. I hang my Rally Flag, get my pic, and then it's back to the bike.



As I've said before, every spare minute is crucial once the clock starts. A 24-hour Rally is a sprint race, where you're trying to fit as much smart riding as you can into a very small time frame. Bite off too much, and you'll miss checkpoints and possibly get time-barred. Choose too little, and you'll end up throwing away good points that I guarantee someone else will have gathered along the way. Efficiency rules here, and is the difference between placing well, and merely having a fun ride around the state.

And safety and personal responsibility is paramount here as well. Another LD maxim is that you can't win a Rally from a jail cell. And the trophy plaques, while impressive, simply aren't worth completely thrashing your bike, or risking a possible hospital stay. But it's our naturally competitive nature that keeps drawing us back to this insanity and so we strive to do better, ride further, collect more points, and eke out another small bonus in the hopes that it's enough to move you up a place. Or three.

While the Rally is on you're competing against yourself to do the very best that you can, and you have to recognize your own strengths and be honest about your own limitations. It's only after the Rally is done and all the scores are tallied and compared that you find out how well you did against all the other riders. All of whom have their own strengths and weaknesses to contend with.

So your major focus is the ride itself, and safely navigating the road, traffic, and weather hazards as presented to you. There is a lot of luck involved here as there are simply too many things well out of your control, but a skilled rider can read and anticipate the situation and make smart choices based on whatever gets thrown his or her way.

So all the way up the 101 to Willits, I kept running the numbers in my head. I had a good, solid plan, based on a very valuable thread, with enough time to add in some small-to-medium bonuses, and hopefully enough time to catch that final mystery bonus thread. It was a good plan, and if all went well it would give me a respectable score.

But Portland kept nagging at me. Now I've ridden between L.A. and Portland literally dozens of times over the past few years while visiting a client up that way. I've been up and down the 1, the 101, and the 5 so many times than I pretty much know every gas stop, every tiny town along the way, and everywhere the local constabulary likes to lie in wait. That kind of "local knowledge" can be invaluable on a ride like this.

But Portland means missing both checkpoints, and I know I can get just as many points on the Thread by adding just a couple more easy bonuses. I'd planned my ride, and was riding my plan.

Unless you could get to Portland and back in time to make the second checkpoint at Napa and add that 1,000 points to the Portland points. Then it becomes much more valuable than chasing fiberglass men all over the state.

I don't want to go to Portland. I want to ride all over California on some old favorite roads, maybe discover a few new roads, get lots of points, and have a blast.

But I am competitive, and I want to do the very best that I can. And preferably just a bit better than the next guy. Or a lot better, if that's possible. And Portland is where the big points are, so Portland is where I have to go. Damn.

This thought process played out all the way up the 101 to Willits, and by the time I'd found the hidden Muffler Man, I knew what I had to do. Riders attempting the Portland bonus were required to call in and report that. So I called Mark and said "Well, it looks like I'm going to Portland." He wished me luck, and let me get back to my Rally. I grabbed a quick sandwich-ette and quickly considered my options.

The problem now was that I had to get all the way up to Portland and back to Napa, and I'd already spent a considerable amount of time gathering Thread bonuses. That now became small points, since I wasn't going to get the entire thread anymore. And I was halfway up the 101, when I-5 is the obvious choice for making time heading north.

So I could either backtrack to CA-20 and cut across to I-5 which added 70 miles, or I could stay on 101 and hope the motor homes were all at home dreaming of better days with cheaper fuel. Either route should take the same amount of time according to my GPS but I-5 can be quite fast through northern California. Still, my GPS often over-estimates time taken on "smaller" roads, at least compared to the time I can usually make.

Besides, I'm already on 101 and it's a much more scenic route. Even though there are a few single-lane no-passing areas through the Redwoods, there are enough dual-lane 65-mph stretches that I figure it's worth the small risk. So I point the GT north and take my chances. I vaguely remember some sort of large Harley run up 101 from a previous Cal24 and I wonder if it's an annual thing, or even the same weekend. As I get further north, I start running into clumps of shiny bikes and I realize that it is happening again, right in front of me.

But I'm barely exaggerating when I say that most of the bikes either saw me coming and pulled towards the right lane, or stayed defiantly clumped in the left lane while I slide by on the right. I try and wave to say "it's cool" but I'm more focused on clicking off the miles. And fortunately the motor homes are very light, and it seems that every time I get behind a particularly lumbering beast, a passing lane magically opens up. Now I do see my fair share of locals out patrolling, but it seems that most of them have either already nabbed some speeding hooligan, or are simply asleep at the side of the road. Honest.

I decide that I have enough fuel to make it past Eureka to Arcata, where I stop and fill up and quickly grab another sandwich-ette to tide me over. Then it's up the 199 where again traffic is unseasonably light and the temps start to climb as I move inland. Soon enough I've entered Oregon and reached Grants Pass and I-5. A quick stop there rids me of my heated jacket and allows another 4Ē of sandwich sustenance then I'm making good time up a road that I know all too well.

Remember that 1/2 hour I spent getting the San Jose Muffler Man first thing in the morning? The one that was now only worth 60 points because I'd given up the massive Thread bonuses? My best guess, if everything else went perfectly, was getting to the Portland bonus at 6:00 p.m., a good 1/2 hour after it opened. Which was okay since it was open for an hour total but still, I could really use that time on the way back down to Napa.

So I maintained my pace and noticed that I would need to get gas either just before or just after Portland. Elevated interstate speeds are great for putting the miles down, but play havoc with your fuel mileage. I decide to get gas on the way up, and grab a station at Lake Oswego that I know is a quick on/off. Besides, I can use the break from the freeway drone, even if itís only for a few precious minutes.

You know you've reached Oregon when the gas station attendant comes out to start up the pump for you. As if someone could be competent enough to drive a 5,000-lb SUV or a 160-mph motorcycle, but can't be trusted to operate a simple gas pump? At least they let bikes fill up their own tanks, as I really didn't have the time or inclination to explain to the attendant that yes, there are two gas tanks on this bike. But I suppose it keeps folks employed which is a good thing, especially in these times.

While the tank is filling, I grab my cell phone to call in and tell them I'm not going to make the first official checkpoint. We were allowed to skip it, but we had to call in during the checkpoint window or risk a 1,000-point penalty. A thousand points is tough to come by, so losing them is a Very Bad Thing.

I notice a message from Ernie, a good friend who lives on the outskirts of Portland who has been following my SPOT GPS tracker. I don't have time to return messages but Rallying is a lonely sport so I give him a call anyway. He chides me about a California-based Rally taking me up to Portland, and asks if he should fire up the grill for me. A steak and some fine company sounds really good about now as I'm already tired of soggy Subway-ettes, but there's no time for all that nonsense. So I chuckle, briefly explain about the Portland bonus and get back on my way.

Those of you who have been following the Cal24 Rally know that the past three years have all been won by Jeff Earls. I've rallied with him before, and he is an extremely competent rider and an incredibly efficient Rallyist. He simply finds the best of all possible routes, then digs in and gets it done. I've learned a lot just watching him as he tackles whatever challenges are thrown at him without fuss or fanfare. And his results speak for themselves.

Hey, the Rally instructions for this bonus actually said that you'd be joining the Jeff Earls Fan Club. I guess the fact that I was already a member helped . . .

But Jeff was unable to run this year's Cal24, so he and Mark cooked up a bonus where he would be hanging out at a bar in Portland, and we would ride up to meet him and get a picture and an autograph. Well, at least those of us who were crazy enough to ride to Portland for nothing more than a pic and a signature.

On the way up I had passed another Rally rider whom I recognized and I waved, but I was on a tight schedule. Dave passed me right back when I stopped for fuel, so he reached Jeff before I did. And was apparently a little confused as to where I had disappeared to. But I made it up just a few minutes past 6:00 and found Jeff, who looked up and merely said "Hi Ken," as if we had run into each other at the grocery store.

Jeff mentioned that he was in Medford at 1:00 p.m. that afternoon, and had to hustle himself to get to his bonus location on time. In fact, he said that when he arrived right at 5:30 p.m. there were already 5 riders waiting for him. So I knew then that I did in fact have some Serious Competition, and that they were already 1/2 hour ahead of me.

Heck, we could have just had the bonus location somewhere in Medford, and saved all of us 550 miles or so. But we donít want to make all this too easy, now do we?

I got my pic and signature, and chatted briefly with Jeff about bike maintenance (he also rides a GT). Jeff mentioned that there were five riders there when his bonus opened at 5:30, and again I cursed that first 1/2 hour. He then said something about all the other riders putting themselves in the pic with him, but I had read the instructions as merely needing Jeff and my Rally Flag in the pic.



I took the opportunity to avail myself of the local facilities (no, not beer, although Portland has some great micro-brews) and got back on the bike. But the pic still nagged at me, so I re-read the bonus instructions. Then I called Tom and asked for a clarification. Better to find out now than at the scoring table when the points are denied. It wouldn't be the first time a heroic ride was rendered impotent by a simple misunderstanding of the directions. And not even my first time for that scenario, either.

But the pic was good, and I needed to get moving if I was going to make it down to Napa in time for that critical 1,000-point bonus. I knew that bagging Portland would put me in the top-10 at the least, but I wanted to do better than that. I had managed a 3rd-place finish in the '07 Cal24 (beaten by Jeff, of course) and I was really pushing for another podium finish. I knew that the top riders would almost certainly be separated from the rest of the pack by the Portland/Napa combo, and that they would be separated from each other by whatever else they could gather up along the way.

Ken
Pacific NorthWet
'13 Dark Graphite Metallic K16GTLD, 24K miles and counting...
'09 Magnesium Beige Metallic K13GT, 60K miles miles and counting...
'02 Mauve Metallic K12LTC, 106K miles and sold
BMWLT#145, IBA# 366, MOA# 111996, SCMA# 24032

All lower 48 states plus Alaska on the K13GT in two weeks . . .

Some people see the gas tank as half empty. Some see it as half full. All I care is that I know where the next tankful is coming from...
Meese is offline  
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post #4 of 8 (permalink) Old Jun 20th, 2009, 12:15 am Thread Starter
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Back to the Barn

With my major bonus in the bag, it was time to scoot south. I head out through Oregon's busiest metropolitan area with the lowest speed limit on I-5 at 55-mph. Really? 55 mph? On a freeway? At least it wasn't 50 mph like some of Portland's other "freeways."

Now I'm back to the mental arithmetic to pass the interstate time. How far is it to Napa? When does the checkpoint close? What else is between my current location and Napa, and would I have time to get any of it?

Somewhere along here it was time to don the heated gear. Stop at a closed weigh station, gloves off, Teknic outer jacket off, Darien outer pants off, Gerbings heated pants on, Darien pants back on, Warm-n-Safe heated jacket on, outer jacket and gloves back on, grab a quick sandwich and get back on the road and up to speed. And then glorious warmth as the night settles in deeper around me.

There was another Muffler Man bonus in Hat Creek, which was out Highway 299 just north of Lassen Park. This would be my fourth Thread bonus so it had escalated to a tempting 480 points. And there was Highway 89 just past Mt. Shasta which meant this was a triangular detour rather than an out-and-back.

But time was tight, and the 1,000 points at Napa was more important than the possible 480 points for going down a temptingly-twisty mountain highway and coming back down another fun twisty mountain highway. If I'd gotten to Portland right at 5:30 and gotten right back out again I might have been able to make both, but as it was it would require an 80-mph moving average to get there and back to Napa in time. That simply wasn't possible on an Oregon interstate that dropped back to 55 mph at every small town or burg, each of which was usually patrolled very heavily, was currently in the prime of dusk deer infestation, and where it had just started raining fairly heavily. So I reluctantly crossed Hat Creek off my list, and kept on heading south.

Soon enough I crossed back into California and its much more reasonable speed limits. My next fuel stop was in Dunsmuir and I had made some good time despite the circumstances, so I took a few precious minutes to look over the bonus sheets and to nail down exactly where the checkpoint was. Since I wasn't riding the main route I had to improvise, but I was able to locate the checkpoint and show that it was indeed downtown. And my GPS showed me an alternate route that took a few precious miles and minutes off my arrival time. There's nothing like reaching a bonus town with minutes to spare, only to find out that what you're actually looking for is 5 miles further up the road. Or 10 miles back behind you.

I also wanted to see if there was anything else worth grabbing along the way. There were some medium points near Rio Vista, but they were too far off my route. There was also a small bonus at the Jelly Belly factory right off I-80 in Fairfield that I thought I could make if I had enough of a cushion by the time I got near it. And there was an Opera House bonus right in Napa, as well as some big points further west that were possible once I had cleared the checkpoint.

As I headed down I-5 at a "comfortable" pace, I came upon up two other Rally riders on RTs. I knew exactly where they had just come from and where they were heading, so I waved in camaraderie and kept on motoring.

The remaining ride was uneventful, although I did start feeling the fatigue set in as I transitioned to the 505 and down to I-80. Crank up the Van Halen on the GPS and just keep on moving . . .

I had almost a 10-minute cushion as I reached Fairfield, so I detoured to the Jelly Belly factory. Way in the back of the parking lot was a pleasant grassy lot with a fake fire hydrant so those four-legged jelly bean connoisseurs could do their business in style. With that answer written down, it was back to the freeway and then across CA-12 and up CA-221 directly into downtown Napa.

At the last mile or two, I came upon those two RT riders again. They had gotten ahead of me while I detoured at Fairfield, but I doubted that they had been able to grab any points between Portland and Napa.

As we all pulled up to the checkpoint location with mere minutes to spare, we realized that the final block was fenced off due to construction! So that's why the Rally Pack had us go the long way around! I was in the back at this point, and already searching for an alternate route in my GPS. The problem is, Napa has a few one-way streets, and there is also that river that you have to get across . . .

But I found a 4-block detour and headed off, with the two RT's and another confused rider in tow. We all managed to pull into the checkpoint in time, to our collective relief.

After that heroic ride, I took a few minutes to refill my water jug with water provided by the Rally staff (thanks again, guys). I also took the time to chat with some other riders, as the problem with skipping the main route is that you rarely get to see anyone else. And I verified my remaining route options again.

The biggest priority now was making the 2,800-point mystery combo bonus sometime between 5:00 and 6:00 a.m. We had been warned that it might take some time to complete that bonus, so most of the late-checkpoint riders headed directly there. I knew the Napa Opera House a couple of blocks down was a given, and wondered briefly if I could make some of the coastal bonuses that were in the 400-500 point range. But big points don't come easy or quickly, so I passed. Then I noticed another hundred points just up the 101. Where I had been hours earlier on my way to Willits. Oh well, live and learn.

I decided that I'd shoot to arrive at the combo bonus no later than 5:30 a.m., which gave me time to backtrack to Rio Vista for a three-bonus cluster. That was a risk, especially that late in the game and with an unknown combo task ahead, but I've learned that Rallies are won in the final few hours when most riders have burned themselves out and are simply focusing on finishing. Besides, my GPS said I had plenty of time . . .

So back out to I-80 it was, back past Fairfield, and off on the smaller roads towards Rio Vista and the edge of the Sacramento River delta. The first bonus was to write down who the Rio Vista bridge was dedicated to. I knew that already as my GPS told me who, but I still had to ride there and log my time and mileage. The next bonus was off to Isleton, where the instructions on how to find a particular historic building were pretty vague. But I figured it out, found the info sign, and wrote down which group had plans to restore that building.

Then it was off south to find a fishing supply shack. Again, the bonus directions were vague, but my GPS found the correct road so I was off. On smaller, rougher, and more twisty roads that meandered through the delta. With a tight timetable to keep to. Eventually I found the road I was looking for and followed it almost 2 miles to its end. Only to find another road, and a sign pointing 4 miles further on. Down a smaller and bumpier road, next to the San Joaquin River channel. In the pre-dawn darkness. With a tight timetable to keep to.

So I bailed on that small bonus, hoping that it wouldn't affect my final position, and really hoping that I hadn't just wasted enough time to screw myself out of a possible 2,800 points.

After a quick stop in Walnut Creek for my final fueling, it was down I-680, jog over to I-880 south, then drop right onto CA-17. I remember this road from the '07 Cal24, where I was also pushing time hard to make a timed checkpoint. But that was at the beginning of that ride, not after riding to Oregon and back. And again, the fatigue was setting in. I briefly considered stopping for a rest, but time was tight and the sunrise was near, and I needed to keep moving.

So I pulled off at Summit Road and was waved in to the little parking area by a couple of cold but very enthusiastic volunteers. I was probably warmer than they were with my heated gear on, but they had probably gotten more sleep.

They handed me the bonus Rally sheets and I scanned them quickly. Hmm, two pages of "left at the stop sign, right at the light, left again" with a few questions tucked in to ensure that we had actually taken the correct route. It was already 5:35 and the packet said that it would take between 70-100 minutes to complete the task. Okay, I've got 85 minutes until the clock stops, so let's just hope that their estimate included getting back to the host hotel and that this little detour wouldn't leave me sitting somewhere 20-30 minutes away when I had completed it.

Damn, I really wish I had that first 1/2 hour back . . .

So back up CA-17 I head, counting bridges and looking for my exit. At this point the sun is coming up nicely, and the quick stop at some friendly faces along with a complete shift of gears has helped tremendously. I'm fully awake again, and the brain is engaged in following turn-by-turn directions, interpreting random questions, navigating some very tight and twisty roads, and dodging the deer that have now come out for their morning stroll.

I find the first question without problem, then I wonder if I've forgotten something. So I look over my paperwork and realize that I hadn't filled in my time or mileage for when I got to the Summit Road bonus area. Let's see, check the GPS, subtract 8 miles from my current odo reading, and I know I got there just past 5:30 a.m., so that was easily rectified. I found out later that another rider had forgotten to fill that part in, and was denied all those points because of it. It may sound harsh, but those are the rules. Like the rest of us who have done just that at one Rally or another, I bet he'll never make that mistake again.

With that little disaster averted, I'm on my way again and clicking off questions in rapid succession. No problems here at all. Left, right, right again past a reservoir, and all the while I'm watching my GPS tell me that I'm getting further and further away from the host hotel and the end of my adventure. Finally I see that I'll be dropping back down to the 101 near Morgan Hill. Good, a short interstate blast should help get me back to the finish line on time. Hopefully.

Finally, I get to the last question: "How many reservoirs did you pass since you started this segment?" Wait, what? I don't know, I wasn't counting! Always read the bonus sheets all the way through before you start out. Always.

I figure a best-guess is better than no guess at all, so I zoom the GPS back out and try to estimate the extremely convoluted route I had just taken. It looks like 5 little blue splotches on the map, so 5 reservoirs. But wait, there's another up off CA-17 that I must have passed right after I got the bonus sheets. So 6 is my answer.

But there's no more time to sort that out, as my GPS is now claiming that I'll be 3 minutes late to the finish. If everything goes perfectly, that is, and I don't get caught in traffic or construction, or simply make a wrong turn somewhere along the way. Some of those transition ramps can get rather confusing after 2 states and well over 1,500 miles in 24 hours.

I clear the remaining local stoplights and get onto 101 north. I can maintain a good pace as the freeway is mostly empty at this hour. Not many folks are crazy enough to be up at 6:30 on a Saturday morning. Or to have stayed up all night. But the LD Rallyist is a special breed, where normal rules and constraints (and common sense) simply don't apply.

So I keep moving north, the GPS keeps counting down, and my arrival time slowly drops. As I transition to I-880 south, I've gained a 2-minute cushion. Not very much, but it'll have to do.

Off at the first exit, onto the surface streets and around to the hotel. I make the few lights that are between me and my destination and pull up to the finish with less than 2 minutes to go. I get my final odometer reading and park the bike for the last time. It's done, and I've made it.

Ken
Pacific NorthWet
'13 Dark Graphite Metallic K16GTLD, 24K miles and counting...
'09 Magnesium Beige Metallic K13GT, 60K miles miles and counting...
'02 Mauve Metallic K12LTC, 106K miles and sold
BMWLT#145, IBA# 366, MOA# 111996, SCMA# 24032

All lower 48 states plus Alaska on the K13GT in two weeks . . .

Some people see the gas tank as half empty. Some see it as half full. All I care is that I know where the next tankful is coming from...
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post #5 of 8 (permalink) Old Jun 20th, 2009, 12:15 am Thread Starter
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But It's a Good Tired

Now the paperwork begins. Grab my Rally Book off the bike which has all my bonus sheets, receipts, and answers. And don't forget the camera. One of the rules of LD Rallies is that once you sit down to score, you're done. No running back to the bike because you forgot something, or you left your camera in the saddlebag, or your fuel receipts in a fairing pocket. If you don't have it on you when you sit down, you don't have it, period. But they make that abundantly clear, and even ask when you sit down if you have everything you need.

I took some time back in the hotel room to go over all my paperwork once more. Pics - check, receipts - check, everything answered and filled in correctly - check.

I realized that since I hadn't got all the Muffler Men Thread, I wasn't sure which was the one true Muffler Man. Oh well, no biggie, as the Portland/Napa combo was simply worth more points. At one point later I did overhear someone say that San Jose was the correct answer (remember - he was actually holding a muffler instead of just standing there empty handed). I hadn't yet turned in my paperwork or been scored, but that didn't matter. I had missed those points, so there was no way I was going to add them in after the fact. That's simply not how we play this game.

I then headed downstairs and got in line to be scored. I easily spent more time there chatting with other riders than I had done in the past 24 hours. But eventually I was up to be scored and it all went very well. No problems with the Muffler Men, Jeff's pic, or any of my other answers. Fuel log is good, everything is crossed and dotted and the points are checked off and adding up quickly.

I did lose that final 400 points for the reservoir question. It turns out there were only five, not six as I had guessed. Oh well, that'll teach me to skim the bonus sheets too quickly. Again, I wasn't the only rider to get caught out there.

The Muffler Man question came up, and I mentioned that I had heard the answer but didn't get it on my own. Someone said that I could have added it in before scoring, but I replied, "No, I really couldn't."

At this point, we don't get to see our official Final Score. But I've already added it up in my room, so even taking out those 400 reservoir points, I know that it's still quite a respectable score. The only question remaining is whether another of the Portland/Napa/Summit riders managed to get anything else better than I had along the way.

But there's no way of knowing that until they call out the results at the final banquet. We have some time to kill, so I decide that a shower and a two-hour nap sounds really good right about now. After all, I still have to ride another 350-odd miles back home tonight.

I awake just a few minutes before the dinner, throw on enough clothes to be respectable, and head down. The place is already packed, and the only spare chair I can find just happens to be at the staff/volunteer table. No problem, as it'll give me a chance to thank some of them in person for all their hard work and enthusiasm. Plus the staff table usually gets first crack at the buffet, so it's all good.

After a tasty BBQ repast, we settle in for road tales and Special Recognition for a few of the, shall we say, more outstanding riders. Frivolity and formalities aside, we get down to the business of calling off the riders based on score. Hmm, Eric has DNF'd due to food poisoning. He clearly falls under the Serious Competition heading and he's still looking a bit pale this morning. Man, I'd hate to have to deal with something like that on a ride like this.

So the count-up begins. Scores are read out, riders are called up, we get a few more tales of triumph and tragedy, everyone applauds, and we all move closer to the final tally. At one point, Mark lets slip that only 7 riders made the Portland bonus. OK, so that puts me in the top 7 at least. Some of the other riders that I consider Serious Competition get called up well before I'd expect them to. Okay, sometimes you have a hard ride, things don't quite click, luck just isn't quite on your side. We've all been there.

All during this, Ernie (my buddy up in Portland) has been texting me with "So? How'd you do? Did you win?" As if I'm not nervous enough already. I know I've had a good ride, but exactly how good remains to be seen. As I said, there was some very Serious Competition here.

At one point, Mark calls up a friend of mine, Dave. I know he made it to Portland because we were there at the same time. But he succumbed to fatigue on the way back down and stopped for a nap. Which is far more preferable than the alternative. Once youíve hit the wall, your only sane choice is to stop and get some good rest. But he overslept, missing Napa. The resulting delays cost him a ton of points, but it was still a hell of a ride. We've all been there, too.

My buddy Jerry gets called up in 7th place and recognized as the highest scoring non-Portland rider. I can tell he's happy with that result, and I'm happy for him.

Now Jerry did manage to get nailed by the Cal24 Police. Which consists of Rally volunteers with a radar gun sitting somewhere along the route. If you're caught going over the posted speed limit, you get flagged down and get a warning. Get caught doing 20 over and you have a choice of sitting bone still for a full minute for every mph over, or losing 100 points for every mph. Now losing 20+ minutes of Rally time can really mess up your plan, but there are very few sections where you can earn back 100 points per minute. So this is a fairly effective way to keep the riders paying attention, and to discourage them from riding like a Knob.

Jerry took the time penalty, and wisely used that enforced break to do soma additional route planning. The best thing is not to get nailed of course, but if you do, then additional planning is a smart thing to do.

Eventually, Mark starts calling up the Portland riders. But not me, not yet. There's the two RT guys, yet I'm still sitting. Okay, so it is a top 3 at least, which I'm quite happy with. I text that to Ernie, who's almost giddy with suspense. You and me both, Ernie.

Finally, it's just the top two. Alex, who maintains the Cal24 website, is sitting at the next table over. He and I kinda look at each other, and smile. Then Alex gets called up. He's a good rider, and I know that he rode hard and earned that position. There's lots of well-earned applause, and I'm glad that his wife and son can both be there for him.

So then Mark says, "Well, there's only one guy left in the room. Ken, come on up."

So I did it. My best ride yet in a Cal24 Rally. The next few minutes are kind of a blur. Folks are clapping, Tom is handing me the 1st place plaque, pictures are being taken. All I can think is that I have to call Dayle and tell her the good news. And text Ernie back. But not just yet.


(pic taken by Ken Anderson, a Cal24 volunteer)
(BTW, the pic isn't fuzzy. It was me that was blurry about then. )

I give a brief overview of my ride, because I know folks want to know how it was done. And I have the presence of mind to thank the Rally staff and all the volunteers. I truly believe that we can't play this game unless folks are willing to put in the hard work that makes it possible. A smiling face and a "how're you doing" at some lonely checkpoint is worth a lot, especially coming from someone who's been sat out there for a couple of hours already while the rest of us are out playing.

Then it's back to the table and more congratulations from my peers. These guys have ridden the ride, they know what it took, and their camaraderie comes from respect. A respect that goes both ways, no matter how any particular individual did.

I do remember to text the good news to Dayle & Ernie before I realize "Hey, I missed dessert." There's some pie left, so I settle in to a well-earned slice as folks begin to clear out and head their own separate ways. I spend a few minutes talking with the stragglers (mostly the volunteers - do these people ever quit? ) but eventually, its time to get my riding gear back on.

I head out to the bike and call Dayle. She's as pleased as I am, but hearing her voice simply reminds me of how far away she is. Or rather, how far from home I am. And how far I have yet to ride that evening.

Ken
Pacific NorthWet
'13 Dark Graphite Metallic K16GTLD, 24K miles and counting...
'09 Magnesium Beige Metallic K13GT, 60K miles miles and counting...
'02 Mauve Metallic K12LTC, 106K miles and sold
BMWLT#145, IBA# 366, MOA# 111996, SCMA# 24032

All lower 48 states plus Alaska on the K13GT in two weeks . . .

Some people see the gas tank as half empty. Some see it as half full. All I care is that I know where the next tankful is coming from...
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post #6 of 8 (permalink) Old Jun 20th, 2009, 12:15 am Thread Starter
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Epilogue, or Just a Little Bit More

The most direct route home is straight down the 101, for another 330 miles and 5 1/2 hours. That's not a difficult average speed, but it's close to 6 p.m. already and I'll need food and gas somewhere along the way. And I'm no longer on the Rally clock, so I might even be able to sit down for a meal for a change. Which realistically means a midnight arrival.

Or I could cut back over to I-5 which is 20 miles longer, but much faster. But I'm really tired of the interstates by now, so another 5 hours of dicing with big rigs and cell-phone SUVs is not tempting in the least.

Earlier, some riders were talking about riding Highway 25 out of Hollister. I missed that section because I skipped the entire main route, but it is a good road that I haven't been on in a while. And it's not an interstate, so that's where I'm going. I can top off fuel in Hollister, then make it home in one long shot. Or stop and get food somewhere along the way, especially if fatigue starts becoming an issue. Sometimes a short break like that to just not be moving anymore can do wonders for a tired rider.

As head out of the Bay Area proper and meander down to Hollister, I start doing math in my head again. Let's see, 1,573 Rally miles in 24 hours, plus another 340 or so home, that makes just over 1,900 miles in about 40-odd hours. All I'd need is another 100 miles or so to make it a SaddleSore 2K ride (2,000 miles in 48 hours). Heck, what's an extra 100 miles after what I've just been through? I mean, I could see Washington State a mere 24 hours ago. Plus I've had a couple of hours of good sleep and well, I'm not usually one to give up an opportunity like this.

So I do some quick planning to see if I can pull this off without using the interstates. Hmm, down CA-25 from Hollister, east across CA-198 to Avenal, south down CA-33 through Taft, then detour west on CA-166 to Santa Maria before heading south again on 101 towards home. I briefly consider cutting across on CA-58 towards Santa Margarita (another of my Favorite Roads Everô), but I know that there's no good receipt at the eastern end and I want to be able to prove that I did the extra mileage. So I fill the main tank only in Hollister, because I know that I'll be making a few more stops at critical corners.

I enjoy the ride down CA-25 and at one point come upon a car who has spun out into a pole. This isnít a tough road, but you do have to pay attention. Thereís no point in stopping as the CHP already has it covered and I think thatís probably the first time Iíve seen a LEO on this road. Not counting the Cal24 police, that is.

I turn onto CA-198 and continue on to Avenal/Coalinga, where I stop for a quick bite to eat and grab a receipt. Then down to Taft, where I fuel up again and get another receipt. Time, date, location, gallons, cost. I'm not on the Rally clock anymore, but if you do these things every time that you ride, then it becomes second nature when you really need to do it. The ride across CA-166 to Santa Maria is good, as most of the big rigs that frequent this stretch have long since gone to sleep, As have most of the sane drivers.

A quick check of the GPS shows that I'm only running 10-12 miles over my 2,000-mile goal. That's not much of a cushion, but I know my Rally miles have been certified and if need be I can always ride past my house to get another 10-20 miles added in. And I have until 7 a.m. to do so, although once I get near home I know I'm just going to want to curl up with my beautiful wife.

Just north of Buellton, CA-154 cuts across southeast past Lake Cachuma and through the Los Padres National Forest. This is another great road, and is my usual choice when in this area. But it is shorter than staying on the 101, and right now I don't need shorter. I need miles. So I save it for another ride and stay on the 101 down to Gaviota and the coast.

The first possible stop along this section is in Goleta, which as a UCSB alumnus I know well. So I stop for another quick bite to eat at a local fast food chain that I know is open 24 hours, and collect another timed receipt. That proves that I took the long route rather than the shortcut, so now it's a simple ride down the 101 to home. Another fuel receipt is gathered just down the road from my house to "stop the clock" as it were, and then I'm pulling into the garage. Tired, but in a very good way.

I do have enough presence of mind left to snap a pic of my final odometer reading and get a screen grab of my SPOT tracker web page, then email those to both Tom and Mike. That's not strictly necessary, but more documentation is always better than less, and since I hadn't pre-planned this SS2K I figured proving my route and final mileage before the 7 a.m. completion deadline was a good thing. I'll fill out the forms and send off my receipts as backup but for now, it's simply time to sleep.

Ken
Pacific NorthWet
'13 Dark Graphite Metallic K16GTLD, 24K miles and counting...
'09 Magnesium Beige Metallic K13GT, 60K miles miles and counting...
'02 Mauve Metallic K12LTC, 106K miles and sold
BMWLT#145, IBA# 366, MOA# 111996, SCMA# 24032

All lower 48 states plus Alaska on the K13GT in two weeks . . .

Some people see the gas tank as half empty. Some see it as half full. All I care is that I know where the next tankful is coming from...
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post #7 of 8 (permalink) Old Jun 20th, 2009, 5:25 am
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Location: , 01, France
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Long thread but very interesting.

Congratulations on your win, sounds like you worked hard to achieve it. Never had the opportunity to do something like that over here, but sounds a real challenge, and 2000ks in two days, you're a much better man than me!

Well done

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post #8 of 8 (permalink) Old Jun 20th, 2009, 9:28 am Thread Starter
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Location: Oxnard, CA, USA
Posts: 3,139
Thanks. It was an intense ride, but a lot of fun (despite my whinging about Portland ).

You coud always pop across the channel for the Brit Butt Rally. If you can get used to riding on the "wrong" side of the road, that is.

Ken
Pacific NorthWet
'13 Dark Graphite Metallic K16GTLD, 24K miles and counting...
'09 Magnesium Beige Metallic K13GT, 60K miles miles and counting...
'02 Mauve Metallic K12LTC, 106K miles and sold
BMWLT#145, IBA# 366, MOA# 111996, SCMA# 24032

All lower 48 states plus Alaska on the K13GT in two weeks . . .

Some people see the gas tank as half empty. Some see it as half full. All I care is that I know where the next tankful is coming from...

Last edited by Meese; Oct 28th, 2009 at 6:11 pm.
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