ESPN writer thinks you may be a moron - K-Bikes.com - Excellence in Motion
 
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post #1 of 10 (permalink) Old Aug 9th, 2006, 9:23 pm Thread Starter
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Thumbs down ESPN writer thinks you may be a moron

for riding a high performance motorcycle and he wants them regulated off the roads..... He is extremely anti-motorcycle.

Gregg Easterbrook

http://sports.espn.go.com/espn/page2...t&lid=tab3pos2


Sayonara, Hayabusa: "It remains totally ridiculous, to say nothing of immature, that Ben Roethlisberger, or anyone, rides a motorcycle without a helmet." (From TMQ in August 2005.)

The Hayabusa looks pretty sweet -- but it's a weapon on the roads.

Helmet aside, this is what Roethlisberger was straddling when he wiped out -- a Suzuki Hayabusa, advertised by the manufacturer as "the fastest production bike on the planet." The Hayabusa has a 160-horsepower engine, same as the new Ford Fusion sedan. But the motorcycle weighs 478 pounds, while a Fusion tips the scales at 3,101 pounds. This means a Hayabusa throbs with seven times the horsepower-to-weight ratio of a modern car.

Another vehicle with a 160-horsepower engine is the Cessna 172 Skyhawk, with a maximum takeoff weight of 2,450 pounds. Roethlisberger's bike had five times the power-to-weight ratio of an airplane, and minimum-weight criteria dominate aircraft design. The Hayabusa boasts a peak speed of almost 200 miles per hour, but since no street rider ever approaches peak speed, in everyday circumstances what the power is used for is acceleration.

The bike accelerates from zero to 100 miles per hour in three seconds, which is astonishing. The new Corvette Z06, the fastest Corvette ever, accelerates from zero to 60 in 3.8 seconds, plenty dazzling enough. But the Hayabusa gets to 100 miles per hour faster than the best Corvette reaches 60 miles per hour. One-thousand-one, one-thousand-two, one-thousand-three -- your Hayabusa is now moving 100 miles per hour.


Like all max-performance bikes, the Hayabusa is basically a big engine with two wheels and a seat. There are no safety mechanisms: no roll bars, no shoulder harness, no impact-absorbing beams, no air bags, not even bumpers. Acceleration of max-performance motorcycles is wildly disproportionate to driving needs.

The only real use of the acceleration ability is road rage -- to drag-race from stoplights, cut others off in traffic, speed like mad.

Perhaps you've been on a highway when a couple colorful high-performance bikes have roared past you at far over the speed limit.

The people on the bikes may be morons, which is their problem.

But their antisocial behavior is your problem, since vehicles moving significantly faster than the speed of traffic are a leading cause of accidents.


This column isn't much of a fan of the tort bar, yet wonders why litigators have not put the Hayabusa and similar overpowered bikes out of business.

High-performance street motorcycles are socially irresponsible, and designed without regard for the safety of riders.

Roethlisberger and others who buy high-performance bikes don't wish anyone harm, they're just looking for an ego rocket. But harm is what they cause, and legislatures should intervene.

The Constitution says you've got a right to own a gun and to read a newspaper; firearms and materials related to First Amendment political, artistic and religious expression are the only categories of purchases with specific constitutional protection. Race a mega-motorcycle on a private track? Sure. But public roads are subject to public regulation. Our nation's laws do not confer any "right" to operate on public roads a high-horsepower bike, anymore than there's a "right" to drive a bulldozer down the middle of an interstate.

It is past time the high-horsepower motorcycle was regulated off the roads. The intended use of these bikes is lawbreaking!


He wants to hear from you here:

http://proxy.espn.go.com/chat/mailba...event_id=11535




.

Warning: Elbows in mirrors may be closer than they appear.
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post #2 of 10 (permalink) Old Aug 9th, 2006, 9:32 pm
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Originally Posted by solo
There are no safety mechanisms: no roll bars, no shoulder harness, no impact-absorbing beams, no air bags, not even bumpers.


.
I think this also describes the Cessna 172

Blkvelvt.

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post #3 of 10 (permalink) Old Aug 10th, 2006, 7:20 am
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Originally Posted by solo
for riding a high performance motorcycle and he wants them regulated off the roads..... He is extremely anti-motorcycle.

He wants to hear from you here:

http://proxy.espn.go.com/chat/mailba...event_id=11535
Another attention-seeking, light-weight purveyor of spurious nonsense. Why would you bother replying to such an obvious attempt at stirring up a self serving debate. Let the clown huff and puff but don't add any "fuel" to the spark with a reply.
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post #4 of 10 (permalink) Old Aug 10th, 2006, 3:24 pm
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sent him an email saying to eat my shit

Ride it like you stole it

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post #5 of 10 (permalink) Old Aug 10th, 2006, 6:26 pm Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Lenz
Another attention-seeking, light-weight purveyor of spurious nonsense. Why would you bother replying to such an obvious attempt at stirring up a self serving debate. Let the clown huff and puff but don't add any "fuel" to the spark with a reply.
I would disagree on that. The guy is a journalist for one of the largest media outlets, ESPN, in America. He has a large audience who probably don't know beans about sportbikes and sportbike riders other than what they see dramatized in the news.

This sort of misinformation can easily lead to the general public calling for the politicians to legislate our bikes out of existence. Don't you think that the insurance industry would love to have a hp limit set on these 'weapons'? 40 or 50 hp is all we really need, right? The politicians have always been very close to the insurance companies and their lobbyists. Lots of money there and it ALWAYS comes down to money.

I mailed Gregg and explained how he didn't seem to care much that Big Ben wasn't being a responsible rider because he had N0 gear on. That I didn't understand why he also didn't call for the ZO6 he touted to be legislated off the roads. That Big Ben would have been hit even if he had been on a slow Harley. And that it's normal for motorcycles and airplanes to not have bumpers.

I think this should be spread to all of the m/c publications and websites there are. A few months ago a newspaper columnist in Texas, Austin I think, went even a little bit further. He wrote in his column for all the readers to see, how fed up he was with sportbikes on the highways and that he wanted to open his door into one of them when the rider splitting lanes came by him.

After the flood of mail and correspondence from outraged riders, the journalist was fired. While Gregg hasn't mentioned the destruction of a m/c he has given wrong and manipulative information to a lot of people who won't know any better because there was no rebuttal or correction of the facts. Just how he worded it... / 'When Ben 'wiped out'....Ben didn't wipe out. He was struck by an automobile that turned left in front of him. / The weapon goes 'nearly 200mph'. So what, Ben wasn't speeding. / 'Hayabusas reach 100mph in 3 seconds, in less time than the ZO6 reaches 60'...Hell, I wished.

Most importantly /'The only real use of the acceleration ability is road rage.
Well that pretty well sums up your decision to ride a sportbike for his audience.

We don't need any more help maligning the sportbke riders image. There are plenty enough riders who do that on their own. I would hate to see something like this be taken to the extreme the Gary Busey accident was.

Screw Gregg Easterbrook and screw ESPN for allowing that drivel to be spewed.


Rant off.

Warning: Elbows in mirrors may be closer than they appear.
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post #6 of 10 (permalink) Old Aug 11th, 2006, 7:38 am
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The main reason I would like to treat this moron with contempt is that it's hard to believe that a coherent reply from the motorcycling fraternity with supporting facts would be treated any differently by this individual than the truth already has been. This guy is an attention-seeking arsehole who will be just as happy at the centre of any media beat-up he can create. Typical muck raking approach - why let the facts get in the way of an inflammatory argument that he initiates and controls.

If there was some way around the editorial input by this guy that would provide an open forum for response then it's worth the time to fire back with both barrels.
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post #7 of 10 (permalink) Old Aug 11th, 2006, 3:04 pm
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Interesting fit, was jsut reading this yesterday:

http://195.224.59.217/news/archives_...ls.asp?id=4735

PUBLIC KNOW NOTHING - SHOCKER!
10 August 2006

The latest from the MCIA who have doscovered that the non biking public have biased and inaccurate perceptions of motorcycle riders.

INDUSTRY CHALLENGES PUBLIC OPINION ON SPEEDING AND MOTORCYCLISTS

An MCI survey, carried out by Tickbox.net has found that the general public has inaccurate perceptions of motorcyclists’ speed of travel when these are set against the results of Government research.

In the Tickbox survey, over half (57%) of respondents thought that motorcyclists were likely to speed on their way to work but only 23% thought car drivers were likely to speed.

However, official Government surveys of thousands of vehicles have shown the average recorded speed of PTWs surveyed is at or within the prevailing limit. Whilst a significant minority, about 1 in 4, exceed the limit by more than 5mph in built-up areas or 10mph in non-built-up areas, the figures show that about 1 in 5 car drivers are doing the same.

The Tickbox survey revealed that the view of motorcycle riders among those surveyed are closer to the official findings, particularly in urban areas. There was a 3 way split of opinion among motorcyclists, with 35% suggesting car drivers were the speeding culprits, compared to the 33% who considered the riders themselves to be at fault. 30% said that they thought neither was more likely to speed on the way to work.

Government statistics show that driver figures for speeding are very similar to riders and in light of current discussions on lowering speed limits and intelligent speeding systems on bikes the motorcycle industry wants to raise awareness that speed is not the only factor that should be focussed on when dealing with road safety issues.

MCI’s Craig Carey-Clinch said, “Speed limits have a key role to play, but they must be relevant to conditions on the road in a given situation. Setting arbitrary lower limits for the sake of it isn’t always helpful and can contribute to riders and drivers taking less responsibility for their actions as they focus less on the road and more on watching their speedometer. It is more important that all road users are well trained, aware of other road users and competently skilled so they are able to react appropriately in all situations.”

“New technological developments, which could lead to remote control over bikes also pose some concerns. Technology that can inform riders in real-life situations does have value, but if they are designed to the extent that it interferes with a rider’s control and ability to complete manoeuvres, then this becomes a serious issue.

“ The industry is committed to making roads safer for all users but believes that a broader approach that addresses training, skills, attitudes and infrastructure in addition to sensible speed choice is the most effective way we can reduce road casualties.”
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post #8 of 10 (permalink) Old Aug 11th, 2006, 3:11 pm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by K12R
“New technological developments, which could lead to remote control over bikes also pose some concerns. Technology that can inform riders in real-life situations does have value, but if they are designed to the extent that it interferes with a rider’s control and ability to complete manoeuvres, then this becomes a serious issue.”
Yikes! What in the hell is he talking about?! Who's proposing remote control over bikes?

Matt

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post #9 of 10 (permalink) Old Aug 11th, 2006, 4:38 pm
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he probably hangs out in the NFL lockeroom and offers to dry their
backs off for them after they shower!!!

fuking weenie!

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post #10 of 10 (permalink) Old Aug 11th, 2006, 6:55 pm
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Originally Posted by K12R
Interesting fit, was jsut reading this yesterday:

http://195.224.59.217/news/archives_...ls.asp?id=4735

PUBLIC KNOW NOTHING - SHOCKER!
10 August 2006

The latest from the MCIA who have discovered that the non biking public have biased and inaccurate perceptions of motorcycle riders........
Lot of official weight in this discussion. The concept of having a "remote control" function legislated onto bikes is just more of the same uninformed bullshit. Perhaps this article should be sent to both the journalist and the ESPN management along with personal comment.
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