The infamous CLUNK - K-Bikes.com - Excellence in Motion
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post #1 of 22 (permalink) Old Aug 30th, 2006, 9:27 am Thread Starter
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The infamous CLUNK

Well we have had other threads about this. And the only thing that really really bugs me about my KS is that horrible clunk from 1st to 2nd, 2nd to 3rd. I have had many other wet clutch bikes and this one the noise IS excessive.

Talked to numerous BMW Techs and get the usual "Nature of the Beast", expression. Have talked to numerous Mechanical Engineers whom I trust (when you are the Senior Field Engineer for the brand new 2 billion dollar Mini Cooper factory in Brazil, and someone that has been riding bikes since 9 years old) I trust their opinion (my dad by the way), should I also mentioned that in his garage he has a (ST1300, 99 LT, 04 R1150RT and a Silverwing) and that CLUNK is NOT NORMAL, Nature of the Beast "my ARSE".

Well based on some posts I read here about people adjusting the shift lever all the way down the furtherst down you can go, to the point you have to fish for it with your feet seem to fix the problem somewhat.

Well I did that yesterday for the hell of it and VOILA....VOILA...VOILA. I know get what I believe to be a normal clunk between those gears and an even smoother shift at the higher gears (4, 5, 6) and downshifts.....WOW downshifts are so smooth you wonder if it downshifted.

So just wanted to share my experience with you guys.

I can live with fishing for the gears

Darcy Bastos
2006 K1200LT
Atlanta, GA
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post #2 of 22 (permalink) Old Aug 30th, 2006, 10:06 am
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Wow!

Thanks...I'm adjusting mine tonight.

Can you give me a quick rundown on the procedure?

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post #3 of 22 (permalink) Old Aug 30th, 2006, 10:34 am
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I just did the same thing and went for a test ride on my 06 K1200R. While it seems it may be better I did not notice very much of a difference. I suspect your foot just has more leverage in that position. It would be interesting to hear from others that are going to give it a try. It is well worth the try since it takes one adjustable wrench and about 2 min. to complete.

Give us some feedback!

Jason
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post #4 of 22 (permalink) Old Aug 30th, 2006, 11:51 am
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Quote:
Can you give me a quick rundown on the procedure?
http://www.k-bikes.com/forums/showthread.php?t=5706

Check this link out.
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post #5 of 22 (permalink) Old Aug 30th, 2006, 12:39 pm Thread Starter
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SportRider

Check the link posted above by 143.... scroll down the post and see the pictures showing. You got it all there basically, no fairing removal, nothing.

Darcy Bastos
2006 K1200LT
Atlanta, GA
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post #6 of 22 (permalink) Old Aug 30th, 2006, 6:46 pm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ATLDB
........Talked to numerous BMW Techs and get the usual "Nature of the Beast", expression. Have talked to numerous Mechanical Engineers whom I trust (when you are the Senior Field Engineer for the brand new 2 billion dollar Mini Cooper factory in Brazil, and someone that has been riding bikes since 9 years old) I trust their opinion (my dad by the way), should I also mentioned that in his garage he has a (ST1300, 99 LT, 04 R1150RT and a Silverwing) and that CLUNK is NOT NORMAL, Nature of the Beast "my ARSE"......
Beautifully stated old mate.
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post #7 of 22 (permalink) Old Aug 30th, 2006, 7:20 pm
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I think this is further proof that the new generation K bikes are VERY forgiving of complacency or sloppiness in shifting technique. Regardless of the position of the shift lever, I have found that preloading and being very positive with shifting virtually eliminates the clunkiness.

It's not the speed that kills, it's the rate at which the speed diminishes...
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post #8 of 22 (permalink) Old Aug 31st, 2006, 6:49 am
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I understood "preloading" the shift lever was not a good thing for the shift mechanism.
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post #9 of 22 (permalink) Old Aug 31st, 2006, 8:00 am
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I demoed the K12S in Vermont and found the same problem. My actual comment to BMW was "This is definitely not your father's K-bike, well...except for the clunky transmission". The clunky trans seemed no different to me than the clunk on my K75C or any other K I've ridden, K12GT, K11RS, ect. Without making ANY mechanical adjustment on those bikes but adjusting my shifting technique instead I was able to shift sans clunk. I applied this technique to the K12S demo bike and it solved the problem just as with all the other K's.

What to do:

When riding bring the RPMs up to where you want to shift. Nothing special here, just get the RPMs to that optimal spot. As your bringing the RPMs up (a second or two before you shift) take your shift toe and put a bit of 'pre-load' on the shift lever. By pre-load I mean just a little upward pressure on the lever. Don't shift or knock it out of gear, but put it right on the brink.

Next, when you're ready to shift, crack the clutch lever just enough that the shift lever falls into gear. Release the clutch and go, go, go. Cracking the clutch may be a just little squeeze or it may be half a pull depending on the play in your clutch. There should be no reason to pull the shift lever to the grip. That causes a pause where either RPMs drop -or- the bike get in gear ok, but there is a pause before getting back on the throttle.

This technique will not damage or harm your trans, clutch or whatever. If you try it and you grind gears or have some other undesirable result try again, paying closer attention to what your doing. It's a technique based on feel (shift lever on foot, RPM peaking, clutch to hand to foot to shifter) that doesn't take long to master, but takes a while to make habitual. I suggest taking the long way home from work and trying it. When mastered it is a short, concise and quick but FLUENT and SMOOTH method that enhances the shifting on any bike (I've used it on R-bikes, Suzuki, Kawasaki...). It also puts you in more control of your bike by trimming off the slightest of a second and making the bike MORE RESPONSIVE TO YOUR CONTROL INPUTS. And like the Hokey-Pokey, that's what it's all about.

My father (who taught me this technique and uses it religiously for the past 100k miles) likes to tell a story about how, on his way home from work on his K11RS, he was zipping from light to light at a spirited pace (must've been the Friday of a rally weekend). There was a guy in a car in the lane next to him going the same way. After a few miles they came to a stop light and the guy in the car gets Dad's attention and asks him (with a look of amazement and slight confusion :wtf ) if his bike is an automatic. 'Nuff said.
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post #10 of 22 (permalink) Old Aug 31st, 2006, 2:57 pm
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In my previous post I meant to say that the KS/R bikes are very UNFORGIVING of complacency or sloppiness in shifting technique.

It's not the speed that kills, it's the rate at which the speed diminishes...
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