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post #1 of 25 (permalink) Old May 31st, 2006, 12:46 pm Thread Starter
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Interesting Motorcycle Safety Stats

http://www.iii.org/media/hottopics/i..._sort_739026=4

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post #2 of 25 (permalink) Old May 31st, 2006, 4:03 pm
 
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Liars, Damned Liars and Statisticians

I take exception to the sentence composition in that article. I don't doubt the raw numbers, but the conclusions shown in sentences such as that below seem to twist the facts:

"NHTSA data show that in 2004, 46 percent of motorcycle riders age 40 and over were killed in crashes, compared with 23 percent ten years earlier."

Are we to believe that almost 1/2 of our brother bikers (we AARP eligibles) were killed in 2004?

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post #3 of 25 (permalink) Old May 31st, 2006, 5:09 pm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bob204bc
I take exception to the sentence composition in that article. I don't doubt the raw numbers, but the conclusions shown in sentences such as that below seem to twist the facts:

"NHTSA data show that in 2004, 46 percent of motorcycle riders age 40 and over were killed in crashes, compared with 23 percent ten years earlier."

Are we to believe that almost 1/2 of our brother bikers (we AARP eligibles) were killed in 2004?

Yeah...to me it should read:
"NHTSA data show that in 2004, 46 percent of motorcycle riders killed in crashes were age 40 and over, compared with 23 percent ten years earlier."
And a big reason for it is because a lot of 'over 40' boomers bought motorcycles in that period.

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post #4 of 25 (permalink) Old May 31st, 2006, 7:19 pm
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I think the data on fatalities/injuries by time of day is interesting. I wonder whether it means you are less likely to get hurt if you ride when there is less traffic (early in the AM and late at night) or whether it just means that fewer riders are on the road at those times and therefore less accidents occur.

I'd like to think the former is true - it would vindicate my philosophy of riding when traffic is light on the roads and before my wife wakes up and asks me to do chores around the house.
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post #5 of 25 (permalink) Old Jun 1st, 2006, 8:13 am
 
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Just my personal observation:

1) Florida repealed their mandatory helmet law and the first years M/C deaths rose like 33%.

2) The average age of a H/D buyer is 54 years old. A great number of them didn't ever ride bikes before or haven't rode bikes in 30 years.

3) When I go out on my BMW in full dress safety suit and full face helmet I notice that 95% of the bikes I see are either:

A. Cruiser bikes-riders without helmets riding bar to bar.

B. Crouch rockets doing 60 MPH wheelies with riders in sandals, shorts and T-shirts but no helmets.

I think there is a reason for everything. Go beyond the numbers and do a little real world snooping and there are reasons for the rise in deaths of M/C riders. These idiots that go out drinking and riding hurt all of us. The kids that have limited or no riding experience and are allowed to buy a "play-racers" that will go over 150 MPH are also hurting us.

My wife and I are looked at as odd when we go out riding in full outfits. Real M/C boots, pants and jackets with armor, full face helmets and actual M/C gloves. I see women in tank tops, short shorts and sandals, nothing on their heads and hanging off the back of a cruiser bike "enjoying" the wind in their hair. Its no wonder my nephew, the emergency room trauma doctor calls these people "organ donors". He gets to see these poor souls when they come in ripped to pieces with little or no hope of survival.

Wake up!
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post #6 of 25 (permalink) Old Jun 1st, 2006, 10:38 am
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hans471
B. Crouch rockets doing 60 MPH wheelies with riders in sandals, shorts and T-shirts but no helmets.
Just saw that yesterday, except that the individual was wearing a helmet (a beanie-type no less), and it was some Mr. Cool-type on a big, chromey, loud Harley instead of a rice-burner. Whatever. I just laugh when I see that sort of thing.

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post #7 of 25 (permalink) Old Jun 1st, 2006, 12:16 pm
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I think the facts are pretty plain. When these sorts of stats come up, I'd like to see the same figures for cages. A fatal crash in a cage can end up with more than the driver killed.

Interesting you have States that haven't made helmets compulsory, there's one simple thing to get right.

Interesting there seems to a lot of drinking motorcyclists. On most bikes and particularly a KRS I don't think there's any room for impaired senses - everything can happen just so quick.

It's sad that motorcycles contribute greatly to reducing city and urban traffic congestion but carry the highest risk.

I thought the phrase 'Motorcycle Operator' was rather cute!



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post #8 of 25 (permalink) Old Jun 1st, 2006, 3:42 pm
 
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Originally Posted by hans471

My wife and I are looked at as odd when we go out riding in full outfits.
I don't think so really, you are just not looked at at all.

Some of those folks that you think have thought you odd have bought into the ABATE philosophy as stated in the ABATE of Illinois position paper dated 4/14/06 which says:

"Focusing on injury reduction devices and mechanisms can lead to a sense of false security and subsequently, poor driving practices. " Did you know that ? Better wise up !

Couple that with their plan to teach 34,000 high school students to watch for motorcycles and their desire to develop a consistent crash data collection system and they have a plan !

Every little bit helps, but some people are beyond help. We just do what we can.

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post #9 of 25 (permalink) Old Jun 1st, 2006, 5:52 pm
 
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i saw a good one the other day, sandles, shorts helmet and NO SHIRT. he was on some kind of jap sport bike. a true classic for the record books.
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post #10 of 25 (permalink) Old Jun 1st, 2006, 10:57 pm
 
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I got my first real motorcycle, a Honda 305 Super Hawk, in 1964. Silly me, I always wore a helmet while riding the bike. I raced off-road bikes for seven years. I wore a LOT of safety gear. Fact is, I felt very naked and exposed without leathers, helmet, those big boots, chest protectors, etc., etc.

One thing all real bike riders know is, you have either fallen down or you will fall down, its just a matter of time. Wearing all that protective gear doesn't give me a false sense of security. Hell no! It is a constant reminder that we are always exposed to the risk of something going wrong.

Its interesting how non-riders, and non-informed riders, come up with "solutions" to our problems. Riding a motorcycle is serious business and needs 100% of a person's constant attention. As I have heard fellow pilots say, the sky is not inherently dangerous but it is terribly unforgiving of those who chose to ignore the risks and fail to plan for them.

Motorcycles share that too.
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