rear brake noise 03k12rs - K-Bikes.com - Excellence in Motion
 
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post #1 of 9 (permalink) Old Sep 21st, 2008, 1:46 pm Thread Starter
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rear brake noise 03k12rs

My lack of knowledge is about to become obvious, so please don't smack too hard.
For the last couple weeks my rear brake has been making a slight intermittent grinding noise. Little the pad, piston, etc. was touching during wheel rotation. I thought maybe it was sticking since I've gotten caught in the rain a few times lately.
Anyway, this morning I checked things out and am figuring I need new pads. I don't usually work on my K because I've figured I should let BMW do it. I have no problem fixing my truck or my 74 CB 360. I ride year round so I can't just wait until spring to repair. With money being tight these days, I'd like to repair myself.
Various points I need help with:
- Can I replace the pads or does it require the horrifying ABS bleed people post about?
- Where is this 'wear indicator' I've heard about? I can't find anything that I think, oh that's it. Yes I did take the cover off the top of the rear caliper but don't know what it is supposed to look like good or bad.
- There are a few slight grooves on the disk, not deep, not many. Can I manage or does the disk need to be turned (like a car)?
- Should I also do the front pads now?
- Pads are about 4000K old
- Are there covers that go over the top of the front calipers?
Any help is appreciated, Thanks
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post #2 of 9 (permalink) Old Sep 21st, 2008, 3:58 pm
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pads

Stop riding ;the bike before you do harm to your disc. The pads are the most simple procedure, your book tells you how to do it. Depending on the size of the tyre you may have to remove the bake calipers, allow yourself ten minutes for the complete job, second time around.
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post #3 of 9 (permalink) Old Sep 22nd, 2008, 9:33 am Thread Starter
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Ok, I found the maintenance manual. It shows what the indicators are and how to read them. Now I still don't know how to replace the pads.
From what you said it sounds like pulling out the retaining clip, pulling pads and sliding new ones in possibly. I don't want to mess things up.
Any further help would be greatly appreciated, Thanks
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post #4 of 9 (permalink) Old Sep 22nd, 2008, 12:11 pm
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Hello from Croatia!

This job is easy:
I recommend to take off the calipers by undoing two 10 mm hex bolts, with old pads on using two screwdrivers separate the pads (get the pistons back in),
after that don't touch the brake!!!
Remove the retaining clip, pull out the pad holders, pull out the pads, put new ones in etc.
If you have any technical knowledge, you can do it.
be sure to apply the brake after installation and prior riding to get the pads to the disc.

One important thing:
NEWER NEWER NEWER turn your motorcycle disc!
NEWER!

Regards, Goran!

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post #5 of 9 (permalink) Old Sep 22nd, 2008, 4:41 pm
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pads

Quote:
Originally Posted by AugWest
Ok, I found the maintenance manual. It shows what the indicators are and how to read them. Now I still don't know how to replace the pads.
From what you said it sounds like pulling out the retaining clip, pulling pads and sliding new ones in possibly. I don't want to mess things up.
Any further help would be greatly appreciated, Thanks

Sounds like you have it under control. Not much to mess up. You will drop the pads inside and have to fish them out. Then you will develop a method of avoiding it next time. No big deal. Little bit harder than inserting the ignition key, not as hard as replacing the tool kit in the holder. Plastic cover, flips off....Pull out the two pins....shit the old pad has dropped down.....Hook it out , then the other....Getting smarter this time we lower the new pad in, inserting one pin....then the other pad....Great!!! Clip is back, cover back....Pump brake....And away we go. Roadside job whilst drinking a can of Coors.
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post #6 of 9 (permalink) Old Sep 23rd, 2008, 7:40 am Thread Starter
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Thanks for the replies guys. I picked up the pads last night and will be doing the install today and post how it went.
Gmurtic, I spent the night in Zagreb back in the mid 80's on my way to Istanbul. I stayed in a 'modern' mid-rise hotel. The room was really stuffy so I figured I'd open the windows to get some fresh air. They were all screwed shut with brackets. Thinking that was really stupid I pulled out my tool kit and unscrewed a couple brackets to open a couple windows. A few minutes later hotel staff and the police were screaming and banging on my door. Apparently all the windows were screwed shut so snipers couldn't shoot at people from the hotel. Needless to say the realized I was just another stupid american.
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post #7 of 9 (permalink) Old Sep 23rd, 2008, 9:35 am
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AugWest
Gmurtic, I spent the night in Zagreb back in the mid 80's on my way to Istanbul. I stayed in a 'modern' mid-rise hotel. The room was really stuffy so I figured I'd open the windows to get some fresh air. They were all screwed shut with brackets. Thinking that was really stupid I pulled out my tool kit and unscrewed a couple brackets to open a couple windows. A few minutes later hotel staff and the police were screaming and banging on my door. Apparently all the windows were screwed shut so snipers couldn't shoot at people from the hotel. Needless to say the realized I was just another stupid american.


Yes, "those were the days"...
That was the old communist regime of the former Yugoslavia, that is why we had war and separated from that system...
Unfortunately some still think that we are living under the old flag, but things have changed allot!
You are welcome to come and check it for yourself again...
You can even come and stay at my place, free of charge!!
Regards, Goran!!!

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post #8 of 9 (permalink) Old Sep 24th, 2008, 7:13 pm Thread Starter
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I was going to post yesterday afternoon but the site was down (at least for me).
I want to Thank You guys for posting your replies. I switched out the brake pads yesterday morning. You guys were right. It was really easy. I had to add a little fluid to replace some spillage when I pushed the pistons in but it worked out great. No flashing red warning lights.
So thanks again guys.
I'd love to come back to Europe sometime. Unfortunately my mighty dollar looks like the schoolyard nerd these days compared to the big bad Euro.
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post #9 of 9 (permalink) Old Oct 2nd, 2008, 7:37 pm
 
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How to change your K1200RS brake pads and rotors

http://www.k-bikes.com/forums/showpo...0&postcount=21

DIY procedure for replacing rear rotor & brake pads in the 1999 K1200RS
In case anyone needs it, here's what I used as a procedure to replace my rear rotor & pads for my 1999 K1200RS. Notice I go to great lengths to call each component by its proper name; and to specify quantities, sizes, and torques for each bolt. Please correct if I make any mistakes as this is my first time doing this.

REMOVE REAR WHEEL FROM BIKE
- Put the BMW K1200RS on its center stand
- Place the transmission in first gear (as resistance for bolt-removal twisting forces)
- Remove five 17mm wheel stud bolts & washers holding rear wheel onto axle
- Remove the thin 3-inch diameter spacing washer (on the right side)
- Remove the rear wheel out the back (it takes some tugging)
- Clean the rear-wheel contact area shaft drive using a towel and isopropyl alcohol
- Clean the rear wheel with Sonax or P21S wheel cleaner spray keeping it off the tire

Nomenclature: The rear brake disc is composed of three parts. From outside in, they are (1) the drilled stainless steel "brake disc"; (2) the toothed aluminum ABS "sensor wheel"; and (3) the painted ribbed "rear wheel drive" flange.

REMOVE REAR 3-PART ROTOR FROM THE REAR WHEEL
- Remove the rear wheel (see above)
- If necessary, heat the two 5 mm allen-head set screws holding the 3-part rotor to the wheel
- Remove the two 5 mm allen-head set screws holding the 3-part rotor to the wheel

Note: Unlike single-part cast iron bimmer rotors, these 3-part beemer rotors appear to be stainless steel, aluminum, and painted steel - so they don't ship them new oozing with oil to prevent rust; so, you don't have to wash them in brake cleaner or with isopropyl alchool; but it's still a good idea to do so.
Note: If you bought the less expensive factory EBC 2-part rotor instead of the more expensive (by about an extra $150 bucks) Brembo 3-part OE rotor, you'll need to mark where the ABS sensor ring sits on the "rear wheel drive" flange. You'll likely need to heat to remove the three 3 mm allen-head bolts holding the ABS toothed ring to the riveted "rear wheel drive" flange which is riveted to the stainless steel "brake disc" by 10 rivets; then re-install the old ABS ring on the new EBC "rear wheel drive" flange. You do NOT need to remove the 10 rivets!

REMOVE REAR BRAKE PADS FROM CALIPER
- Remove (with an eyedropper) some brake fluid from the master cylinder reservoir
- Remove two 8 mm allen-head caliper bolts (I'm not sure if this is required)
- Pry off the plastic caliper dust cap on top of the rear caliper
- Push the two two-inch-long caliper pins out a bit from the left (muffler) side
- Remove the caliper top retaining spring held in by the two caliper pins
- Remove the center roller held down by the top retaining spring
- Tap some more from the left and then pull the two caliper pins out from the right side
- Save the two caliper pad pins, one caliper tension spring, and one caliper pin
- Measure friction pad thickness (minimum pad thickness is 1.0 mm (0.040 inches)
- Measure rotor thickness (minimum thickness 0.177 inches)

Note: The stock BMW TEXTAR T4069GF rear brake pads (34-21-2-332-988) are semi-metallic in composition (while the fronts are sintered metal).
Note: If you're just replacing pads and not removing the wheel and rotor, then you can skip to here http://www.k-bikes.com/forums/showt...rake+rotor+rear

BLEEDING REAR BRAKES
- Remove right-side side panel
- Remove reservoir cover
- Suction out almost all old brake fluid from the master cylinder with an eyedropper
- Push both caliper pistons back with a four-inch C clamp
- Push two caliper pins out from the left side (pulling from the right side)
- Gather up the two caliper pins, tension spring, and center pin
- Remove the brake pads (yes ... that's what the repair manual says)
- Add newly opened DOT4 hydraulic fluid to the MAX level
- Attach vacuum bleeder to bleed screw
- Create vacuum (how many inches of mercury do you suggest?)
- Open the bleed screw one half turn to allow fluid to flow
- Top off the reservoir as needed to prevent the master cylinder from running dry
- Close off bleed screw when done

Note: The BMW K1200RS Repair Manual specifies bleeding to be done with the rear pads OUT of the top of the calipers but with the rear rotor still on.
Note: If you remove the rear wheel, you don't need to remove the right-side side panel because you can just unclip the rear master cylinder and access it from the rear wheel well.

REASSEMBLE:
- Five 17 mm box wrench wheel lug studs = 77 foot pounds
- Two new 5 mm hex rotor set bolts = 16 foot pounds + locktite
- Two 8 mm allen-head caliper bolts = 30 foot pounds
- Three 3 mm allen-head ABS-ring bolts = ??? foot pounds + locktite
- One 11 mm box wrench bleed screw = 9 foot pounds
- Rear ABS sensor gap = 0.45 to 0.55 mm
- New DOT 4 fluid (one US pint) ATE Super Blue or equivalent

Note: The two new 5 mm hex rotor set bolts come with blue "Tuflok" already on them.






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