Vertically Challenged - K-Bikes.com - Excellence in Motion
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post #1 of 14 (permalink) Old Jul 30th, 2008, 7:56 pm Thread Starter
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Exclamation Vertically Challenged

Being less than 5 foot 10 inches, with an inseam of 28 inches, forces me to use tip toes to touch the ground when stopping on my 2007 K1200 GT; unfortunately a big change from my prior bikes 26 inch seat hight.

Despite putting 8500 Km on this bike in the last few months of ownership, I find that I am not comfortable with stopping, even with the BMW lowered seat; I end up having to come forward to get both feet on the ground.
The result has been a few new scratches on the bike.

Is there an aftermarket lowered seat that is actually lower?

I need input from anyone with a simiilar problem, if you have solved it.

Thanks,

Peter
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post #2 of 14 (permalink) Old Jul 30th, 2008, 8:09 pm
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Low seat. See; http://www.bmw-riders-gear.com/BMWRA...1=&bplo=&bphi=

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post #3 of 14 (permalink) Old Jul 30th, 2008, 9:17 pm Thread Starter
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Already have the BMW "low" seat.

Peter

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post #4 of 14 (permalink) Old Jul 30th, 2008, 9:28 pm
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Well I have a comment to make, sorry if it doesn't really zoom in on your actual physical "bike" problem. Here is a fix and I really want you to think about this.

First of all I was at one time an MSF instructor and gave the MIT (motorcycle in traffic) tests here in Wisconsin, just so you know I didn't just dream all this up.

What I have to say I think really can help you out, and others who have a height problem with BMW or any taller bike.

What I am recommending is that you ONLY put your left foot down, this will help you alot with an inseam problem. NOW a little background which may help you see the logic in driving this way, no matter what you drive.

First, with your foot on the right peg and the brake applied, at night if you are stopped say at a traffic light, the rear brake will be on, which might make a difference in someone noticing you sitting there.

Another reason that this is a good general technique is for stopping on a hill (up or down), you are now in the habit of holding the bike in place with the rear brake. This is good because you now don't have to try synchronizing between the throttle and front brake.

On a tall bike this habit of just putting down your left foot normally will help you in handling the stops better. I haven't been able to flat-foot both feet for over 20 years with my K75S with standard seats and has never been a problem.

Gilly
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post #5 of 14 (permalink) Old Jul 30th, 2008, 11:54 pm
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I sort of agree with GillyWI, but I always put my right foot down and swap to the left foot if I need to take off on a hill. His idea with the left foot makes the most sense as a habit to get into, as long as you leave the bike in gear. However, rightly or wrongly I like to put it in to neutral to save my left wrist from doing so much work holding the clutch in.

The important thing is to make sure you get one foot firmly planted when stopping before doing anything else, so you don't drop the bike. After that you can try getting both feet down or swapping feet or whatever. The one priority is to get the most appropriate foot down to get stability before the bike goes beyond the point of no return.

Bob

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post #6 of 14 (permalink) Old Jul 31st, 2008, 10:53 am
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GillyWI
What I am recommending is that you ONLY put your left foot down, this will help you alot with an inseam problem. NOW a little background which may help you see the logic in driving this way, no matter what you drive.
+1

Standard procedure when I had a KTM Duke II. Absolutely no way for me to tippy toe both feet on that bike.

Just be careful if its really windy - may have to jab that right foot down in a hurry.

Mike

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post #7 of 14 (permalink) Old Jul 31st, 2008, 11:53 am
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Sargent makes a low seat which in the high position is the same as the BMW low seat in the low position. It is about 1" lower in the low position,

I have that 28" inseam and am OK with the standard seat in the low position with the left foot down etc.

What most of the guys miss when they say get used to the standard low seat is when the significant other gets onto the bike. If she is short and you have a top case she has to stand on the peg to get on the bike. No matter how good she is at getting onto the bike you always feel that movement and the have that though of the cost of plastic when the bike shifts to the right.

My wife says she just feels better getting on the bike now that I have the shorter seat.
Now if the damn thing would only breakin.

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post #8 of 14 (permalink) Old Jul 31st, 2008, 5:31 pm
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I'm assuming you always keep the suspension set to "single rider, no luggage". Apart from that the only other thing I could suggest is taking some of the padding out of your low seat base, but I'd guess there would not be a lot in there to remove and it may make it even less comfortable.

I'm not being funny here, but have you tried boots with a bit of a "platform" - like a thicker sole to give you an extra half inch or so? My wife had to go that route, the only drawback is it makes it harder to get under the gear lever.

If your bike is new, you will probably find over time that the suspension "settles" a little - it may not be much, but it all helps.

Bill.

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post #9 of 14 (permalink) Old Jul 31st, 2008, 5:50 pm Thread Starter
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Thumbs up Vertically challenged

Thanks to all for your comments.

Using the left foot down only is a great suggestion, which I have started to use today.

I will investigate the Sargent Seat shortly (sorry for the pun).

Interestingly, the suspension was set at one up with luggage at the time, and now I see that this did complicate things.

Thanks again.

Peter

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post #10 of 14 (permalink) Old Jul 31st, 2008, 7:06 pm
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Hope you get the hang of it. i don't know how long you've been riding. But like they say "we're mammals, we can adapt!".
I just didn't want you to come off with the impression like "oh great, I need to fix this bike and this guy is telling me how to drive!".
I know this was stressed both when I took MSF courses and then when I became an instructor, this is one thing that was brought up in training. I have had people who have had an MSF course more recently said "they never taught that!", but it used to be and I think it makes alot of sense when you think about it.
In my opinion the biggest benefit, even for a low-seat cycle, is the stopping going up a hill. I guess you can always tell yourself you will try this on a hill, but it's better just to develop this habit and do it all the time so it is second nature.

Gilly
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