SaddleSore 1000 - K-Bikes.com - Excellence in Motion
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post #1 of 25 (permalink) Old Sep 29th, 2009, 11:15 pm Thread Starter
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SaddleSore 1000

If the weather is OK this Saturday I will attempt a SS1000 . I would like any hints and tips from riders that have completed the ride and also from those that didn't . Thanks

Have a Great Ride, Lenbo

2008 BMW K1200 GT
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post #2 of 25 (permalink) Old Sep 29th, 2009, 11:45 pm
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I dunno. I just pushed mine around the driveway 0.004 miles and I'm still pooped.

You might want to head one over to the Iron Butt website and look for some tidbits. I wouldn't ask Ken Meese since he didn't finish in the top 5 and some woman (or so she says she is?) named Nancy is out to kick his ass in the IBR 2011.

<damn, I feel feisty just getting of the Nordic Trak!>


Mack
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post #3 of 25 (permalink) Old Sep 30th, 2009, 2:35 am
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Personally, I think the most valuable piece of gear I took was my Camelback, followed by an iPod with loads of podcasts (Hardcore History or something like that).
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post #4 of 25 (permalink) Old Sep 30th, 2009, 7:58 am
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The Iron Butt Association has their Archive of Wisdom here:
http://www.ironbutt.com/tech/aowprintout.cfm

Sugarcrook's advice about the Camelbak would be at the top of most IBA member's lists. You must find a way to stay hydrated while riding. It is NOT sufficient to drink at stops only. I hate backpacks, so I took the liner out of my Camelbak and put it in my tank bag. It is arranged with the mouthpiece tucked under the map so I can easily grab it, take a drink, and put it back out of the way. If you don't have to "go" at each fuel stop, then you aren't drinking enough.

Here are some other basic recommendations:

1. Stop When It Isn't Safe
One of the things I admire the most in my IBA friends is their willingness to stop when they are too tired or it isn't safe, even if it means giving up the goal. You can always try another day. The goal (SS1000) pales in comparison to the costs of injury or death. I have read a great number of ride reports where the IBA rider stopped within an hour or two of the goal because they were no longer safe. This is a cardinal rule that must never be broken.

2. Plan. Then Plan Some More.
Have everything ready long before your ride. Make a checklist. Have contingencies if something fails. What if your cellphone dies? (Carry a printed list of emergency contacts.) What if you get stuck somewhere with mechanical problems? (Carry a couple days' worth of prescription medicines you may need.) Know the traffic patterns along your route - will you be riding through a large city at rush hour? A forest preserve full of deer in the early evening? When is sunset on your ride? What is the weather forecast? What unexpected weather is common at that time of year? Do you have the right gear? First aid? Flat repair kit (do you know how to use it?) etc. etc. etc.

3. Keep Your Stops as Brief as Possible
Fuel, Washroom, Fill camelbak if needed, Check receipt for date/time/location, Make your log entry. Snack. Safety check. Go.

Simply put, you will succeed or fail based on your stops, not your riding speed. I cannot emphasize this enough. Try a dry-run rehearsal of a gas stop at home. Make sure that the things you need at each stop are the most accessible.

4. Get the Miles Early
Strive to reach the 500 mile mark early in the ride, to leave yourself a cushion of time as the day wears on.

Here are some things that work for me. YMMV:

a. Food - I bring plenty of the following for quick and reasonably healthy eating:
Fresh fruit. A variety of breakfast bars. (I like "Oatmeal to Go", in addition to a mix of other bars). Beef jerky for protein. Eat light, but eat often. Ken Meese buys a Subway sandwich, then cuts it into thirds to make three quick meals.

For drinks, I fill the camelbak liner with ice, then fill it with water.

b. LD Comfort Undergarments - Expensive, but worth every penny. Designed by an IBA rider especially for long distance riding. Many riders wear the longs only, for protection in the coldest AND the hottest weather. I have one set of longs and one set of shorts. Everything about them is special - the fabric, the "outside" seams, seam placement, and even a special "roo fly". http://www.ldcomfort.com/

c. Heated Jacket Liner - This is an Iron Butt necessity. I recommend Warm 'n' Safe. (http://www.12voltclothing.com/ or contact Larry Peterson at [email protected]). It is lightweight and packs small. Even if the weather is just a little cool, this accessory makes all the difference.

d. Earplugs or Other Hearing Protection
Even moderate wind noise can damage your hearing when you ride 16 or more hours at highway speeds.

e. SPOT Messenger - I didn't have a GPS on my first SS1000, but I did have a SPOT Messenger. Your family and friends can track your progress on the web. I keep mine face up in the top of the glove box on my K1200GT. Others argue that it should be on your person in case you are injured and separated from the bike. You can use it to summon emergency aid even in places where there is no cell phone coverage. Note: A new model just came out.

f. BMWMOA - Their Anonymous book brings peace of mind.


Read the forums on the IBA website, and you will find lots of excellent trip reports and advice. Here is a trip report from my recent IBA B2B ride:
http://www.k-bikes.com/forums/showthread.php?t=18904

Note that I lost too much time at the stops (changing gear), but I did stop to rest when it was no longer safe. In the interest of safety, I settled for the lesser ride.

Best wishes for a successful and fun ride. You can expect a three-month delay between when you submit your paperwork to the IBA and when you finally receive your SS1000 certificate and IBA membership number.

-- XMR
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post #5 of 25 (permalink) Old Sep 30th, 2009, 8:03 am
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I did an SS1000 back in August, riding from Fairfax, VA to just outside Little Rock ,AR. The total distance was 1124 miles (22 of spent going on a wrong road) and took me 19 1/2 hours. Here's what helped me out:

Keep the wheels moving as much as possible. Stretch out at each stop and get a sip, but don't stay off the bike too long. Constant motion keeps you motiviated.

Make sure your receipts are good. As a minimum, they should have city and state and time/date. Watch your receipts if you're crossing time zones. I had some that showed Eastern Time when I was in Nashville (Central Time). You'll need to annotate that on your travel log. And you need to document each "corner" or route change; ie going from I-66 to I-81 in Virginia.

The iron Butt Association website has a link on their site with 29 tips for doing a distance ride: http://www.ironbutt.com/tech/aowprintout.cfm These should help.

The Camelbak is a good idea. I got the snowboarder version (combination backpack and water bladder) that I kept my rain suit in for easy access.

Good luck and let us know how it turns out.
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post #6 of 25 (permalink) Old Sep 30th, 2009, 11:10 am
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Good Luck on your SS 1000 .

I too am working on getting this done. A couple of questions. I figured the ride should be done on a Tuesday or Wednesday. Our crappy California drivers are mostly at work, and the drivers on the road during the week are more what I call "professional" drivers. Faster and more predictable! Are you planning on mostly Interstate riding?

Also I am going to use seat beads with sheep skin on my stock GT seat. I noticed many of the IBA riders use this system. Definitely gonna get a CamelBack too.

Spafxer
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post #7 of 25 (permalink) Old Sep 30th, 2009, 6:54 pm
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We did a SS1000 this sumer on our Goldwing with 3 other bikes. I think the biggest thing for us was stopping every 120-150 miles for a 10 minute break. The speed of the trip isn't that important, but you should keep moving, Got my certificate last week....good luck and have fun.
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post #8 of 25 (permalink) Old Sep 30th, 2009, 8:40 pm
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The stuff covered above is all good advice. Make the bike as comfortable as possible, carry everything you need with you (especially gear for dealing with a variety of weather situations), keep the stops short (a zero speed really kills your average time), but don't be afraid to stop or to take an extended stop if you really need to (safety always comes first).

1,000 miles divided by 24 hours is an average of 42 mph. If you can maintain even 60 mph, then your travel time is cut down to under 17 hours. That gives you a 7-hour cushion for fuel and rest stops. Some guys will push on through to get done early, and some will stop and rest along the way. If you maintain that 60 mph average (or better), you can ride for 12 hours, stop and sleep for 6 hours, then finish up the ride in the next 6 hours.

On my first SS1000 I got within 150 miles of the finish and was simply too tired to continue. So I got a 4-hour nap at a motel, then finished up in the morning. Even though that meant crossing L.A. in rush-hour traffic, it was better than pushing myself on at night when I simply wasn't safe to continue.

Remember, we do this for fun, so finishing the ride safely has to be the top priority. Even if that means not completing the miles in the time that you planned.

And most importantly, listen to your body. If you need to eat or drink, then do so. If you need to move around and stretch a bit to avoid discomfort, do it. And if you need to just stop moving for a while, then do that. Your body will tell you what it needs, if you listen.

Other than that, have fun planning your route. Pay attention to known bottlenecks like big cities during rush hour, and watch your fuel consumption. It's better to be conservative and add in an extra gas stop than to have to push on through a serious headwind hoping you have enough fuel to make it to the next podunk town, and praying that the town has a gas station, and that it's open . . .

But most importantly, come back and tell us how you did. Whether you succeed this time or not, we'd like to hear about it.

Ken
Pacific NorthWet
'13 Dark Graphite Metallic K16GTLD, 24K miles and counting...
'09 Magnesium Beige Metallic K13GT, 60K miles miles and counting...
'02 Mauve Metallic K12LTC, 106K miles and sold
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Some people see the gas tank as half empty. Some see it as half full. All I care is that I know where the next tankful is coming from...
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post #9 of 25 (permalink) Old Sep 30th, 2009, 8:42 pm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GMack
I wouldn't ask Ken Meese since he didn't finish in the top 5 and some woman (or so she says she is?) named Nancy is out to kick his ass in the IBR 2011.
Hey Mack, Nancy says anytime you want to go for a ride that covers more than your own driveway, she's game. But trust me, that girl can ride the wheels off most folks on this site, regardless of gender . . .

Ken
Pacific NorthWet
'13 Dark Graphite Metallic K16GTLD, 24K miles and counting...
'09 Magnesium Beige Metallic K13GT, 60K miles miles and counting...
'02 Mauve Metallic K12LTC, 106K miles and sold
BMWLT#145, IBA# 366, MOA# 111996, SCMA# 24032

All lower 48 states plus Alaska on the K13GT in two weeks . . .

Some people see the gas tank as half empty. Some see it as half full. All I care is that I know where the next tankful is coming from...
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post #10 of 25 (permalink) Old Sep 30th, 2009, 9:16 pm
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Lot's of good adivce in the previous posts. I did a SS1000 a couple of years ago on my K1200R.

+1 on the 150 mile stops. If you aren't used to long, extended rides this will help keep you alert. I'd drink a liter of water (or Gatoraid) and eat a garnola bar at every stop.

I may be stating the obvious but stay on the Interstate whenever possible.

Good luck!

Mike

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