Drilling into the airbox? - K-Bikes.com - Excellence in Motion
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post #1 of 31 (permalink) Old Dec 31st, 2009, 7:19 pm Thread Starter
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Drilling into the airbox?

I started the same thread on I-BMW.COM. Let's see what kind of results I get here.

Here's one for all the technos:

I have a PowerFRK already installed on my bike. It has worked well to smooth out throttle response and eliminate the dreaded STALL. I am replacing it with another resistance device that has more linearity in its fuel enrichment effect. The PowerFRK has a huge enrichment effect in warmer temps.

I am buying a BoosterPlug http://www.boosterplug.com. The BoosterPlug has a secondary NTC(negative temperature coefficient) AIT(air inlet temperature) probe that has to be mounted in a place that has a free flow of air at ambient temp - like the AIT in the airbox already.

I'm thinking of drilling a 6mm hole in the airbox of my 07K1200GT to mount the secondary probe. I think I can find appropriate fittings to secure the secondary probe and re-seal the airbox - just like the fitting of the AIT already there.

Weigh in with any advice you have. Thanks.

2009 K13S
2000 YZF R1 track bike

Life is all about attitude!
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post #2 of 31 (permalink) Old Dec 31st, 2009, 10:24 pm
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I'm interested in your results from the BoosterPlug, especially in comparison to the PowerFRK, and most especially at higher outside temps.

As for the new temp sensor, why does it have to go in the airbox? The factory air temp sensor for the dash display sits just under the headlight on the right side. It's in the clean airflow from the front of the bike, but far enough forward to be away from the engine heat and far enough back to be out of direct sunlight.

You should be able to find a similar location without too much trouble.

Ken
Pacific NorthWet
'13 Dark Graphite Metallic K16GTLD, 24K miles and counting...
'09 Magnesium Beige Metallic K13GT, 60K miles miles and counting...
'02 Mauve Metallic K12LTC, 106K miles and sold
BMWLT#145, IBA# 366, MOA# 111996, SCMA# 24032

All lower 48 states plus Alaska on the K13GT in two weeks . . .

Some people see the gas tank as half empty. Some see it as half full. All I care is that I know where the next tankful is coming from...
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post #3 of 31 (permalink) Old Jan 1st, 2010, 12:25 pm Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Meese
I'm interested in your results from the BoosterPlug, especially in comparison to the PowerFRK, and most especially at higher outside temps.

As for the new temp sensor, why does it have to go in the airbox? The factory air temp sensor for the dash display sits just under the headlight on the right side. It's in the clean airflow from the front of the bike, but far enough forward to be away from the engine heat and far enough back to be out of direct sunlight.

You should be able to find a similar location without too much trouble.
All that's true. The sensor that comes with the BoosterPlug works best when the installed AIT and the BP AIT are reading temperatures that are identical - according to the BoosterPlug.com website and email conversations that I've had with the designer.

This might fall into the FAITH category rather than REASON category for those of us (me) who do not fully understand what's going on inside the gizmo - other than understanding that the bike ECU will be "fooled" to run about 6% richer at every temp.

Since I've had my GS911 on my FRK equipped bike and can see for myself that the bike is fooled into thinking that it's always 23-25 degrees Fahrenheit outside (regardless of the real ambient temp), I'm taking the BP guy's claim at face value that he has designed a "fooler" that will enrich the air/fuel ratio proportionately throughout the operating range.

When I asked the designer about mounting his sensor in the airbox, he was intrigued by the possibility the two sensors would read exactly the same temp. Another possibility, of course, would be to relocate the original AIT from it's airbox location to another spot close to the secondary AIT. I thought the simpler option would be to tap into the airbox, use either penetration fittings or a really good high temp silicon adhesive to stabilize the secondary AIT and see what I get on the GS911. Any hole I drill would be easy to plug if the idea doesn't work out.

We'll see what happens.

2009 K13S
2000 YZF R1 track bike

Life is all about attitude!

Last edited by laterider; Jan 1st, 2010 at 12:28 pm. Reason: spelling
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post #4 of 31 (permalink) Old Jan 1st, 2010, 4:43 pm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by laterider
The sensor that comes with the BoosterPlug works best when the installed AIT and the BP AIT are reading temperatures that are identical - according to the BoosterPlug.com website and email conversations that I've had with the designer.
In that case, a small hole in the airbox is probably best.

You can drill it in place (assuming you can get the drill lined up in a good spot), but have a buddy hold a vacuum directly over the drill point while drilling to minimize any plastic chips falling into the airbox. I'd also pull the air filter and stuff a rag over the intake tubes too, just in case.

Quote:
Originally Posted by laterider
This might fall into the FAITH category rather than REASON category for those of us (me) who do not fully understand what's going on inside the gizmo
That's true for the FRK as well as the BP.

I'm mostly happy with my FRK as it has made a definite improvement at idle, at low speeds, and in the midrange, but I'm still getting some bogging down and power loss at high ambient temps (over 100). That may not be the FRK itself, but it is something that I need to address.

Quote:
Originally Posted by laterider
We'll see what happens.
Yes, we will. You go first.

Ken
Pacific NorthWet
'13 Dark Graphite Metallic K16GTLD, 24K miles and counting...
'09 Magnesium Beige Metallic K13GT, 60K miles miles and counting...
'02 Mauve Metallic K12LTC, 106K miles and sold
BMWLT#145, IBA# 366, MOA# 111996, SCMA# 24032

All lower 48 states plus Alaska on the K13GT in two weeks . . .

Some people see the gas tank as half empty. Some see it as half full. All I care is that I know where the next tankful is coming from...
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post #5 of 31 (permalink) Old Jan 1st, 2010, 7:20 pm Thread Starter
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Yes, we will. You go first.

Happy to. I'll let you know.

2009 K13S
2000 YZF R1 track bike

Life is all about attitude!
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post #6 of 31 (permalink) Old Jan 2nd, 2010, 12:58 am
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I was interested when I saw the Butt Plug I mean Booster Plug advertised with its own temperature sensor, and cheaper than the FReaK! I have the FReaK already installed but am anxious to see your results... Carry On...

Gary
2007 K1200GT
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post #7 of 31 (permalink) Old Jan 2nd, 2010, 8:58 am
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I'm on the list to get a Booster Plug as well and from what I understand I'll have to pull the tank on my 06 K12GT to install it. Is that correct?
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post #8 of 31 (permalink) Old Jan 2nd, 2010, 12:00 pm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cwf
I'm on the list to get a Booster Plug as well and from what I understand I'll have to pull the tank on my 06 K12GT to install it. Is that correct?
That would be a "YES" if you need to access the Air Temperature Sensor's connector that's under the airbox and in front of the gas tank. The first time, I also had to pull the battery box to get my fat fingers down there to disconnect the two connectors off the front of the fuel-pump mounting plate before I found out how they attach (some plastic tab that clips over the mating one). The small vent hose slides off (no clamp on mine) and the fuel line has a button and self-ejects. The air sensor connector merely requires you to press down on the metal clip and pull apart (with some force).

To do mine, for a Power FRK, took me about 2-3 weeks due to sundry issues becoming a "BMW Wrench" that evolved in what should be a simple job...and I wish not to repeat -- ever!


Mack
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post #9 of 31 (permalink) Old Jan 2nd, 2010, 12:45 pm
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Your experience reminds me of the first time I bled the clutch on my 2000 K1200LT. I installed a speedbleeder in place if the grub screw and I boogered up the connector at the end of the bleeder line . The only way to replace the bleeder line was to pull the entire rear end of the bike (swing arm too). The dealer wanted over $600 so I did it myself. Learned a lot about the bike!

Of course there wasn't one clutch bleeder line in the United States. Took a month for the Fatherland to ship me one (middle of summer and very fine riding weather!)

So so as to not repeat that ugly experience...what words of wisdom would you care to share. I would be thankful unless the memories are too painful!
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post #10 of 31 (permalink) Old Jan 2nd, 2010, 1:17 pm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cwf
Your experience reminds me of the first time I bled the clutch on my 2000 K1200LT. I installed a speedbleeder in place if the grub screw and I boogered up the connector at the end of the bleeder line . The only way to replace the bleeder line was to pull the entire rear end of the bike (swing arm too). The dealer wanted over $600 so I did it myself. Learned a lot about the bike!

Of course there wasn't one clutch bleeder line in the United States. Took a month for the Fatherland to ship me one (middle of summer and very fine riding weather!)

So so as to not repeat that ugly experience...what words of wisdom would you care to share. I would be thankful unless the memories are too painful!
1. Do not replace the plastic "Quick Disconnector" on the fuel tank plate with anything - metal or otherwise. Leave it alone! There is no O-ring in it to bother with. Mine had some special sealant that BMW used on the fitting. The new metal one bottomed out (it's a pipe thread) and the plastic it threads into was spread and had some small cracks in it too. It leaked while riding and I noticed my mileage dropped and I could smell gas every time I stopped. It also leaked gas onto the ground and all over the left side of the engine around the shifter area. I ended up with some $400 borescope (there's a video on this site somewhere about it) to snake into the crevices to find the little leaker (at the Q-D on the fuel-pump plate). The thing soaked the fiberglass insulating mat to the point it dissolved the glue that held it onto the tank's bottom.

Luckily, the thing didn't burst into flames while riding it. The replacement plastic fuel-pump mounting plate is $500 and has the same plastic fitting glued or sealed onto it. Older bikes around the 2000 yr. had metal pump plates and you could screw fittings into them and they would distort nor crack. I reiterate "Leave it alone!" You might replace the O-ring on the mating plastic male connector, or replace that one with metal. BMW doesn't show that O-ring on their GT fiche, but it is the same O-ring as used on a GS (I think that's what Lily at Ozzie's BMW said?).

2. Do not seal up the tank for fuel leaks while it's off the bike, allow it some breathing room. Mine swelled up to the point it would not fit back into the bike's frame. New gas tank is nearly $1000. Of course, it being over 100 degrees outside didn't help either. Took a lot of steaming hot and cold towels to reform that tank to fit back in the bike's frame.

While you're messing with the tank, take a look at the very back end of the tank. On mine, there was some metal clamp on a large hose that was digging into the plastic gas tank. I loosened the clamp and swung it around so it didn't make contact. Seems the tank has been on and of the bike so many times for sundry things like air-boxes, idle controllers, sensors, whatever, that it was getting gouged into pretty good from all the removals. Of course, my re-engineered and newly fattened gas tank now holds more fuel than stock and I plan to sell it to Meese for $3000 too.

Have fun.


Mack

Last edited by GMack; Jan 2nd, 2010 at 1:29 pm.
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