24 Hours / 1000+ Miles Question - K-Bikes.com - Excellence in Motion
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 34 (permalink) Old Mar 3rd, 2010, 3:33 pm Thread Starter
Member
 
K13GT's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: P-Town, Cali, USA
Posts: 76
24 Hours / 1000+ Miles Question

I have a question for you Ironbutt guys, Meese, et al

I'm seriously considering doing a solo 24hr/1000+ miler (as a fundraiser for Special Needs kids) this June and was wondering what you considered the best / optimal "start time"? Early AM, like 4 to 6 AM or later in the morning, or ???

Thanks,

Bruce

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
1980 FXB STURGIS
2010 K1300 GT

2011 K1300 S
K13GT is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 34 (permalink) Old Mar 3rd, 2010, 4:23 pm
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: , , USA
Posts: 90
I think it depends on traffic patterns on your route. You'll obviously want to avoid rush hours, so stagger your route based on that. Also consider that you might be riding into the sun depending on your route. Animals are also more active early morning and evening/night.

I started my IBA ride at 0630 and was done with the 1000 mile portion by 2200.
sugarcrook is offline  
post #3 of 34 (permalink) Old Mar 3rd, 2010, 5:17 pm
IBR# 366
 
Meese's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Oxnard, CA, USA
Posts: 3,143
First, excellent choice doing it as a fundraiser. Well done.

And the answer to your timing question is well, it depends.

The two biggest things to worry about on a SaddleSore ride are fatigue and delays.

Remember, I've done several different weeks of consecutive thousand-mile days, and I've done a dozen or more 1,500-mile days. So while my advice is sound, it tends to the extreme end. But the basics still apply to "shorter" rides.

So, let's go with fatigue first.

Our bodies have natural rhythms that affect our sleep/wake cycles. These are also affected by daylight/darkness patterns. So you need to be aware of that and plan accordingly.

Some folks find it easier to stick closer to their normal schedules in order to minimize the sleep disruption. Most folks can stay awake 16 or more hours in a row without too much difficulty, and that's plenty of time to complete a SS1000 if you choose a good route.

So if you're an early riser, then stick to that schedule. Or maybe get up an hour or two earlier to maximize your daylight riding, and to get done before it gets into the wee small hours.

The natural sleep cycle puts us into a lull or slump around 2-4 p.m. (ever get back from lunch and just get wiped out for the afternoon?). There's also a strong sleep urge between roughly 2-5 a.m. Obviously, that varies between people and circumstances, but usually, a sunrise will refresh you quite nicely as your body reacts to the light and says "it must be time to be awake now".

Other things that can affect fatigue are comfort issues. These can be ergonomic (bad seats, poor posture, excessive wind blast) or external (extreme heat or cold, bad storms, difficult road conditions). Basically, anything that takes energy or effort to overcome is sapping the energy you need to be aware and able to control the bike.

You can minimize the ergonomic issues with better seats, windshields, foot peg extenders and handlebar risers, etc. And good riding gear goes a long way to extending your comfort over a much wider temperature range. I always have my heated gear with me, even in summer (mountains/darkness can still get quite cool), and my main jacket converts to mesh for extreme temps, plus I carry a gallon or two of water with at all times. That has easily carried me from around 30 to well over 110, sometimes in the same 24-hour-period.

Note that I have also used a CamelBak bladder system to stay hydrated with good results. You just have to fill it up more often. And I carry granola bars or energy bars in a tank bag that I can get to while riding if need be, although I've also pre-made several sandwiches so I can just grab one at a fuel stop and thus avoid the whole fast-food or mini-mart delays.

So pay attention to your mental and physical state. Riding a motorcycle is a full time job that obviously requires all of your concentration, but even more so when you're pushing your own personal boundaries.

As for delays, they can usually be categorized as things that you have control over, and things that you don't.

One thing you can control is your own schedule. You obviously will need several fuel stops. If you start with a full tank and consider a conservative 220-240 miles per tank, then that's four fuel stops "on the clock". If it takes you half an hour to find a station, get the bike filled, pay, go to the bathroom, maybe grab a quick snack, and then walk around and stretch, then you've taken 2 hours off your total allowed time. And that might be OK, as 1,000 miles divided by 24 hours is only a 42 mph average. But it also means that you're two hours further past your potential stopping time, meaning it might push you into that "tired" zone in the wee small hours when you will find it harder to concentrate.

Things you can't control are weather (see above), accidents (hopefully other vehicles, not you ), construction delays and sometimes road closures (checking the web for road conditions/delays before you leave can be very valuable), and of course, traffic congestion (obviously worse around major cities). A good route will take all these into consideration and minimize any problems.

Another concern is either a mechanical failure (not much can be done about that except to keep your bike in good repair), or a flat tire. I carry a sticky-string patch kit and an onboard 12V compressor. So if I do get a flat, I can have it patched and filled and be back on the road in maybe 20 minutes. If I'm lucky.

Sometimes, things happen. If it's minor and you can muddle through, then do it. After all, this isn't supposed to be "easy". But if it becomes major or serious, then you may have to make a decision. Should I re-route to avoid the traffic or weather? Should I stop and get a short nap so that I can continue on more safely? Or should I scrap the ride and try it again later when things are more suitable.

Again, all of those are your call, but remember, it's only a ride and not worth doing permanent damage to yourself or your bike. Especially to you.

We talked about minimizing delays, both stopped and while moving. Here are a few examples to give you an idea of the timing you can expect.

I have done two or three dozen thousand-mile days up and back on I-5 (no kidding - I have a client up there and often take the bike). I can do this known trip in 14 hours moving time, at a 72 mph average. It's I-5, so you set the cruise and just keep moving.

I know what my range is, and where all the gas stops are. So I choose a station that I can see from the freeway with a quick on-off, pull in, gas up, get my receipt at the pump, and can be back moving in 5-10 minutes max. Add in a "leisurely" 1/2 hour break somewhere mid-way to get a quick bite of fast food, and I've spent maybe an hour off the bike total. It got to where I could plan that whenever I left, I would be at my destination 15 hours later.

Note that the first time I did a thousand-mile day down I-5, it did take me a bit longer. I was up early that morning to wrap-up a final work meeting, and got on the road around noon. I got to just north of the Grapevine around 1 a.m., with just over 800 miles completed. But I was simply too tired to continue, so I stopped and got a motel and slept four hours, even though I only had about 3 hours riding time left. That put me into L.A. rush hour traffic for the completion of my ride, instead of the empty freeways I had planned for. But at that point, the morning traffic was better than continuing on exhausted and quite possibly nodding off on an empty freeway. And despite the sleep stop, I was still able to safely complete the ride within the prescribed 24 hours and get my first IBA certificate.

I've also done an SS1000 using only the tightest, twistiest back roads that San Diego County has to offer. A friend arranged the ride for his birthday, and about a dozen of us set out using his pre-determined route. It was really hard. So hard, that only half of us were able to finish on time. The others simply cut the route short, got in late, or pulled off somewhere along the way to sleep.

The key to finishing was to simply keep moving. The roads didn't allow for normal highway speeds, so every minute counted. I had an aux fuel cell which cut my stops in half. But still, I kept them as close to 5 minutes as I could. I rode as well as I could to keep up my average speed, but that took a lot of concentration. (Ever ride up a huge mountain in the total darkness? Then ride right back down it again? It's not easy.) I pushed on until maybe 4 a.m. when I was just too tired to continue safely. So I grabbed a 40-mnute nap in a quiet corner of a 24-hour McDonalds, then got a quick breakfast and was on my way.

I finished the ride with maybe 15 minutes to spare, and I was totally exhausted. But I did it, and even allowed myself to stop for some "safe" time when it was needed.

So in summary, make sure your bike is as comfortable as possible. Plan a good route that takes into consideration traffic, weather, and construction. And watch your own needs, too, such as sleep, hydration, and food.

Above all, be safe. And have fun.

Ken
Pacific NorthWet
'13 Dark Graphite Metallic K16GTLD, 24K miles and counting...
'09 Magnesium Beige Metallic K13GT, 60K miles miles and counting...
'02 Mauve Metallic K12LTC, 106K miles and sold
BMWLT#145, IBA# 366, MOA# 111996, SCMA# 24032

All lower 48 states plus Alaska on the K13GT in two weeks . . .

Some people see the gas tank as half empty. Some see it as half full. All I care is that I know where the next tankful is coming from...

Last edited by Meese; Mar 3rd, 2010 at 5:33 pm.
Meese is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 34 (permalink) Old Mar 3rd, 2010, 6:41 pm
Senior Member
 
Semper_Fi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Gloucester , MA, USA
Posts: 153
Ken - outstanding tips and insights for those we want to do some extended riding.

Copying your post and printing it for future reference.

Thanks

Luis

2009 KGT1300 Apple Red (mine)
2008 RT Biarritz Blue (mine - sold)
2005 ST Piedmont Red/Light Magnesium (hers)
Luis Roth
BMWMOA #143775 IBA# 35651
Semper_Fi is offline  
post #5 of 34 (permalink) Old Mar 3rd, 2010, 7:40 pm
Looking for better limits...
 
Razel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Fremont, CA, USA
Posts: 5,163
Watch out for those "Monster" or "Red Bull" energy drinks, should you be considering them. First attempt I made I thought they were a grand idea (back in 2003). No idea that they were great for 1-2 hours, then you were fighting more fatigue than if you hadn't had any. 5-hour energy drink advertisements talk about the "crash" that comes with those other energy drinks. Oy vey ...

Missed the 24 hour time by 6 minutes. I attribute that to long stops for gas and check-in points (Cal24 Rally) and a long discussion with the CHP on the side of the road. Time sneaks away from you. My 3 liter CamelBak was empty at the half-way point, but filled it up w/tap water. Tasted weird, not like the water I was used to from home, but after about 30 miles, tasted just fine.

As Meese indicated, heated gear. I was never so glad for that advice coming over the Sierra's in the middle of June at sunrise. NEVER occurred to me that with Death Valley being 110F at 1:00AM that Lee Vining would be at 35F four hours later.

Don't drink any alcohol after you're finished until you're at home, or where ever you're going to stay for the next day. You're already set for a big nap, and a premature celebratory salute to yourself will make that ride/drive home a heck of a lot worse.

Second attempt five years later I crossed the finish line 35 minutes early.



100% free webcam site! | Awesome chicks and it is absolutely free! | Watch free live sex cam - easy as 1-2-3

Ray
2010 K1300GT Royal Blue
2003 K1200GT Orient Blue (for sale)
2007 G650 X-Challenge

IBA #34158

Be a K-Bikes Supporter

I work for Keyser Sze
Razel is offline  
post #6 of 34 (permalink) Old Mar 3rd, 2010, 7:59 pm
IBR# 366
 
Meese's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Oxnard, CA, USA
Posts: 3,143
+1 to what Ray said about "energy" drinks. Just say no.

Besides crashing harder when they wear off, they are full of chemicals that do really nasty things to your insides. And they taste like crap to boot.

When I'm on a long ride, it's primarily water for me. Sometimes I'll fill one of my gallon jugs with Arizona Iced Tea for a change, but it's the non-caffiene, non-sugar kind. And I may have a soda if I stop for a burger somewhere, but usually only a small size, if at all.

Ken
Pacific NorthWet
'13 Dark Graphite Metallic K16GTLD, 24K miles and counting...
'09 Magnesium Beige Metallic K13GT, 60K miles miles and counting...
'02 Mauve Metallic K12LTC, 106K miles and sold
BMWLT#145, IBA# 366, MOA# 111996, SCMA# 24032

All lower 48 states plus Alaska on the K13GT in two weeks . . .

Some people see the gas tank as half empty. Some see it as half full. All I care is that I know where the next tankful is coming from...
Meese is offline  
post #7 of 34 (permalink) Old Mar 3rd, 2010, 8:05 pm
IBR# 366
 
Meese's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Oxnard, CA, USA
Posts: 3,143
Quote:
Originally Posted by Semper_Fi
Ken - outstanding tips and insights for those we want to do some extended riding.

Copying your post and printing it for future reference.
You're welcome. Honestly, that's why I went into as much detail as I did, in the hopes that it would be useful to others.

The biggest "trick" to riding extreme distances is to figure out exactly what it is that makes you want to stop, then fix that. If your seat sucks, get a better one. If you're too hot or cold, get better gear. If you're hungry or thirsty, carry snacks and water where you can get to it safely while riding. If you're always stopping for gas, get an auxiliary tank. If you get tired, then build up your endurance safely so you can push on longer.

I wouldn't wake up tomorrow and run 26 miles, but if I decided to run a marathon, I'd start a training regimen and get my body and my mind up to speed and into the game. It's the same with endurance riding. To do the seriously extreme miles, you gotta be willing to put the time and money in so you can work up to that level.

Ken
Pacific NorthWet
'13 Dark Graphite Metallic K16GTLD, 24K miles and counting...
'09 Magnesium Beige Metallic K13GT, 60K miles miles and counting...
'02 Mauve Metallic K12LTC, 106K miles and sold
BMWLT#145, IBA# 366, MOA# 111996, SCMA# 24032

All lower 48 states plus Alaska on the K13GT in two weeks . . .

Some people see the gas tank as half empty. Some see it as half full. All I care is that I know where the next tankful is coming from...
Meese is offline  
post #8 of 34 (permalink) Old Mar 3rd, 2010, 9:55 pm
Veteran
 
GillyWI's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Evansville, WI,
Posts: 1,256
Quote:
Originally Posted by Meese
To do the seriously extreme miles, you gotta be willing to put the time and money in so you can work up to that level.
Or just really want to get home.............

I like starting early, but it depends on the route.
The most fatigue inducing condition was riding into sunrise eastbound. I was getting close to the end of this very long straight-through ride, 100 or 200 left to go, and I think there was a confluence of 3 factors:
Riding in to the sun creating fatigue
The natural rhythm already being goofed up by being awake that long, plus
The body not knowing the difference between the sun rising and sun setting.
I had been doing so well (plus this wasn't for any certification, it was I believe before IB competitions even existed) that I decided to rest for awhile while the sun got higher.
I really like the "late night shift", surprising how many miles you can pound on from midnight to 4 am! After 4am they start to drag a little again.

Gilly

"No problem is so big or so complicated that it can't be run away from"

Dark Graphite: Making bikes faster for over 40 years.

Last edited by GillyWI; Mar 3rd, 2010 at 10:04 pm.
GillyWI is offline  
post #9 of 34 (permalink) Old Mar 3rd, 2010, 10:54 pm
IBR# 366
 
Meese's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Oxnard, CA, USA
Posts: 3,143
Quote:
Originally Posted by GillyWI
I really like the "late night shift", surprising how many miles you can pound on from midnight to 4 am!
Yep, the roads are awesome when they're mostly empty.

Whenever someone says "Oh, I never ride at night. It's so dangerous!" I just smile, and keep on moving . . .

Ken
Pacific NorthWet
'13 Dark Graphite Metallic K16GTLD, 24K miles and counting...
'09 Magnesium Beige Metallic K13GT, 60K miles miles and counting...
'02 Mauve Metallic K12LTC, 106K miles and sold
BMWLT#145, IBA# 366, MOA# 111996, SCMA# 24032

All lower 48 states plus Alaska on the K13GT in two weeks . . .

Some people see the gas tank as half empty. Some see it as half full. All I care is that I know where the next tankful is coming from...
Meese is offline  
post #10 of 34 (permalink) Old Mar 3rd, 2010, 11:48 pm Thread Starter
Member
 
K13GT's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: P-Town, Cali, USA
Posts: 76
Ken, Ray, Gilly

Thanks for the wealth of excellent information and insight. I'll be reviewing it frequently over the next few months. A trip like this has been on my "Bucket List" for some time. I'm not a caffeine junkie or coffee drinker so that shouldn't an issue and those energy drinks taste like c_ _p! On my mental check list I was planning on carrying water but now I'll add a CamelBak to that list.
I wasn't planning on installing an auxiliary fuel tank (plumbed) but am thinking about carrying an extra gallon of gas as there will be a possibility of a few stretches where a station may not be open late at night. I'm not interested in zipping up "5" into Oregon and coming straight back, but actually want to do four states. Northern route would be California, South Eastern Oregon, Nevada, and Southern Idaho and return. Southern route, California, Southern (or Central) Nevada, Arizona, Utah and return. Both these routes are in the 1200/1300+ range. The fuel cans I'm thinking about are the ones used to carry camp stove fuel (easier to pack/arrange) versus that of a one gallon can. Any thoughts on that or anything else are extremely welcome.

Thanks much,

Bruce

ps - Hi Ray

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
1980 FXB STURGIS
2010 K1300 GT

2011 K1300 S
K13GT is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the K-Bikes.com - Excellence in Motion forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
A ride tale Arr2Kay Bike Talk 8 Dec 1st, 2010 2:42 am
1000 miles this last weekend on my GT JIS K1200RS/GT (Classic) 15 Aug 3rd, 2007 2:44 am
long story about last years ride KbikeLarry Ride Tales 0 Jun 27th, 2006 10:14 am
FridayBob's trip diary to Death Valley in January FridayBob Ride Tales 2 Feb 23rd, 2006 12:14 pm

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome