Installed new Brake Rotors 2008 K1200GT - K-Bikes.com - Excellence in Motion
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post #1 of 6 (permalink) Old Sep 25th, 2018, 10:34 am Thread Starter
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Installed new Brake Rotors 2008 K1200GT

Successfully replaced my front brake disks yesterday. At 30K miles I was informed by a BMW tech that I had bad pulsing in my front brakes, caused by the disks, worn or warped.

I could feel the pulsing but had ignored it for a long time.

BMW gets $402 per disk plus hardware, plus an hour or two of labor. With the prospect of spending $1,000 for new disks (on a bike worth maybe $4500), I looked around for alternatives.

Beemerboneyard offer two disks for $469 including hardware

On Ebay, I found: https://www.ebay.com/itm/Front-Left-...53.m2749.l2649 for $210 for two, with delivery from UK supplier. The ad copy on ebay says OEM quality. No country of origin is listed. The box I received says motodisk brake rotors #239602, Japanese Standard SUS 420 Stainless Steel, Precision CNC MAchined, laser cut. They look identical to the ones that were on the bike since new. The new disks are rivet hardware style, not rotor hardware style. This relates to the manner in which the floating disk is secured to the wheel hub, and the way they prevent the disk from rattling.

The BMW K12GT documentation spells out the steps to install: Remove front fender, calipers and wheel, heat screws and remove disks, replace disks, tighten screws, try not to mess up the ABS ring, install new brake pads (from beemerboneyard $79.95), install front fender, check rotation of wheel clears ABS ring, Squeeze front brake lever to push out pads. Test ride. Smile.

Total investment: Approximately $300. Time Required: A few hours, as I was out on the road and walking back and forth to the apartment, etc.

I did the install on the street in front of my apartment. Used a small jack and piece of wood to jack up the bike at the headers underneath to lift the front wheel 1 inch. Took the unmounted wheel into the apartment and used a MAP/Propane torch to heat the screws to melt the thread locker. Cleaned and reused the screws. Used a torque wrench and everything. The heads of the screws look terrible (corrosion), so may replace them with new ones when I visit the dealer.



I did a gentle series of brake applications on my test ride to make sure all was working. I cannot feel any pulsing. I'll work up to some harder braking. Time will tell if the new disks will hold up and not warp.

2008 K1200GT, Custom Paint, Vivid Black, Aeroflow WS & Aeroguards, Givi E52 Maxia Topcase w/AdMore Lighting, Zumo 660, Suburban Footpeg Lowering, Sargent Seat

2009 R1200GS Adventure, Magnesium Grey/Black, Adventure Cases, Zumo 660, Touratech Unobtanium Accessories

1974 Norton Commando 850 Soon to be a restoration project
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post #2 of 6 (permalink) Old Oct 1st, 2018, 1:38 pm
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Yeah Ihendrick, You'll probably be fine with the 420 Stainless disks. Most stuff from Japan is excellent as long as it's all really what is stated. The Chinese will go to any length to sell anything including misrepresenting brands, where it's made, materials used, you name it and it's all on eBay.

Back in the early days of disk brakes on motorcycles they used carbon steel and they worked well but everybody was complaining about the rust so they started making them in Stainless, no doubt 300 Series. Then the trouble started. Stainless is a very poor conductor of heat so uneven heating of he disk led to warping. Everybody dropped the Stainless and went back to Carbon Steel. Then in the '90s someone worked up a Stainless disk that didn't warp made of 400 Series (same as used in firearms and knives). 400 Series has less Nickle and Chromium, is better conductor of heat, but will rust. They worked up a process to inhibit rusting and these are the disks we have today.

The only reason I mention all this is to show how critical the material used in brake disks is. One of the most common problems with stuff out of China is that It will be on size and looks good but be made of garbage. They have a real problem with Metallurgy. For this reason, a brake disk is going to be an item at risk when purchased on eBay. If you have difficulty with your new brakes, it will most likely be that they are Chinese counterfeits.

We have all seen there are lots of products out of China that are fine but I would argue that is usually because they are made of none critical materials and or the Western company involved had brains enough to go in with hard-ass contracts and they watch them like a hawk. There are lots of companies that didn't and the result is usually a fiasco. The Gerbing heated clothing outfit is a perfect example. I got 2nd degree burns from a Chinese made Gerbing jacket liner.

Last edited by SpaceViking; Oct 1st, 2018 at 1:56 pm.
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post #3 of 6 (permalink) Old Oct 1st, 2018, 7:24 pm Thread Starter
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Nothing on the package said country of origin. They listed a Japanese standard. They could come from anywhere.

I'm no longer confident that the so called Original equipment listed on the BMW parts websites are any better.

Japan is NOT China.

BMW doesn't make much themselves. They have OEM 's that do that. Those OEM's are a bit of a black hole.

"Made in Germany", no matter how expensive, would have been nice, but there are millions of Japanese motorcycles out there with discs that were manufactured in Japan, and those discs cost about 1/2 the German parts. Honda for the WORLD!

I've been riding for 50 years. I've never seen or even heard of a catastrophic disc failure of any kind. Some discs seem to wear faster than others. Big deal.

I'm not worried. Tell the President, I am a globalist.

2008 K1200GT, Custom Paint, Vivid Black, Aeroflow WS & Aeroguards, Givi E52 Maxia Topcase w/AdMore Lighting, Zumo 660, Suburban Footpeg Lowering, Sargent Seat

2009 R1200GS Adventure, Magnesium Grey/Black, Adventure Cases, Zumo 660, Touratech Unobtanium Accessories

1974 Norton Commando 850 Soon to be a restoration project
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post #4 of 6 (permalink) Old Oct 2nd, 2018, 4:45 am
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If it were from Japan it would likely say so. They don't have much to be embarrassed about. If it doesn't say where it's made, it's likely China.

BMW actually does a pretty good job of controlling what they farm out. I have had my '08 K bike all apart and seen the names of the manufacturers and where they are made. Beemer has gone to Eastern Europe for a lot if it. I see Romania, Bulgaria, and others. Also Finland, Italy, and other Western Europe locations. What is common is at least, is they are all European and are marked so on the parts.

The major assemblies like the engines and frames are made in Germany and that's as it should be. I'm not big on globalism for the simple reason that it's too hard to keep track of production when it's scattered all over the world.

I retired from Boeing Aircraft recently and before I left, I saw the fiasco of trying to build a jetliners globally. The 787 was so badly managed thru "Partnering" that no matter how well it sells, the bottom line will never go into the black. To get control back in house, they had to buy back the rights to the drawings. It was laughable. The first 787 is sitting at the Museum of Flight at Boeing field here in Seattle; Donated because it will never fly. It's held together with Global epoxy.
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post #5 of 6 (permalink) Old Oct 4th, 2018, 8:50 pm Thread Starter
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Global Fail!

I hear you SpaceViking, and can't argue with most of what you said.

Ironically, I should have waited for a thorough test ride before posting my announcement....

It seems that the ebay vendor, in the UK, sent me the wrong disks for my 2008 K12GT! The ones I received came with rivets instead of bobbins for fastening to the wheel. Worse yet, the rivet style requires disks with a machined shoulder around the rivet mounting area to maintain the correct alignment to the hub/caliper, etc.

After a few progressively harder stops, something was clearly wrong, as I got a severe pulsing vibration under braking!

After pulling the wheel, again, and inspecting it was clear there was some slight rubbing disk - to - caliper.

So, I went online to my old reliable, beemerboneyard, who is selling nice German ABM Peak Rotors with hardware for only $469 per pair, ( https://www.beemerboneyard.com/abm320pr2.html ) more than twice the (apparently japanese) units. The good news is they appear to address the fitment issue.

I'll get back here for an update once I test it all out.....but for now I'm glad I got the right parts.
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2008 K1200GT, Custom Paint, Vivid Black, Aeroflow WS & Aeroguards, Givi E52 Maxia Topcase w/AdMore Lighting, Zumo 660, Suburban Footpeg Lowering, Sargent Seat

2009 R1200GS Adventure, Magnesium Grey/Black, Adventure Cases, Zumo 660, Touratech Unobtanium Accessories

1974 Norton Commando 850 Soon to be a restoration project

Last edited by lhendrick; Oct 4th, 2018 at 9:00 pm.
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post #6 of 6 (permalink) Old Oct 14th, 2018, 12:40 am Thread Starter
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Final update: the proper rotors from Beemerboneyard did the job. They came with the correct mounting hardware and today I was able to mount the new rotors to the wheel and the. Install the wheel, and there was proper clearance to the calipers. Nice smooth braking again, no pulsing or grabbing. A pleasure to ride again. I’m pleased with the price, half of the BMW parts and the one day service from beemerboneyard is a pleasure too.

2008 K1200GT, Custom Paint, Vivid Black, Aeroflow WS & Aeroguards, Givi E52 Maxia Topcase w/AdMore Lighting, Zumo 660, Suburban Footpeg Lowering, Sargent Seat

2009 R1200GS Adventure, Magnesium Grey/Black, Adventure Cases, Zumo 660, Touratech Unobtanium Accessories

1974 Norton Commando 850 Soon to be a restoration project
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