Tire Mileage and what affects it - K-Bikes.com - Excellence in Motion
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post #1 of 14 (permalink) Old Feb 4th, 2006, 3:18 pm Thread Starter
 
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Tire Mileage and what affects it

I've seen a lot of posts about tire mileage and the one thing that stands out to me is the belief by many that if rider A gets 9k miles on tire x, they should get 9k miles on tire x. But the bottom line is, the rider and riding style makes MUCH more difference in tire mileage than the tire brand. Sure, other peoples experience with a tire brand is good guidance on whether you'll like it but you shouldn't expect to have the same experience unless you know the guy and know that your riding styles are the same. And I'm not just talking about how fast you go or how low you lean in the twisties.

Tires almost never wear out on the shoulders on the road (I know one racer who lives on a deserted twisty road and wears his shoulder out before the center). So the wear we are concerned about for tire life is the center bead.

Rear tire: In my opinion the single most likely cause of short tire life on a rear tire is agressive downshifting. Down shifts is braking with the rear tire w/o the front. That means the rear tire slows the bike down and causes itself to unweight. There is always slippage. Slippage means wear.

Also overuse of the rear brake causing slippage will severly limit tire mileage.

Agressive starts are 3rd on my list because acceleration weights the rear tire limiting slippage.

Long boring freeway miles, especially on the new roughened freeways will wear the center.

Two up heats the tires more and makes more wear.

Low tire pressure...I'm starting to think 2-5 lbs over recommended pressures is better on dry pavement--but it makes your contact patch smaller so lets save that discussion for another thread.

Front tires

Fronts don't slip or lock up very often so front tire mileage is much more predictable and will likely vary less from rider to rider but the front tire indeed takes more shoulder wear. I've only been riding the K-bike a couple of weeks but the front is heavy and cornering seems to put a lot of force on the front so I'd guess the front won't wear nearly as long on the K-bike as on my R-bike.

I'm hoping others will contribute their ideas about what causes tire wear.

Thanks,
Jerry
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post #2 of 14 (permalink) Old Feb 4th, 2006, 8:03 pm
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Can't really comment on your assumptions, but something I have proven (at least to myself) is the effect of speed and temperature.

This year I rode a lot fewer miles at temps over 100 degrees (live in Phoenix) and also slowed down. I got about 1500 more miles on my last set of tires (Avons), over the previous set. Same bike, same roads, same load, so I'm convinced that road temperatures and speed are a major contributor to tire wear.
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post #3 of 14 (permalink) Old Apr 25th, 2006, 3:22 pm
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KRS tyre mileage

Howdy all.
I can see how the different conditions we expose our tyre's too, affect the wear, and how what works for my riding style may not work for others.
However,
There must be some general rules of thumb.
For example, I would like to know what is the toughest tyre, particularly in the centre, for long, continious, high speed touring.
As Ive have bored everyone with before,, Im soon to head off on a approx 16000 klm round trip of Oz (in 28 sleeps time, not that Im counting)
The country roads here can be abrasive, the temp warm if not hot in the north, and the speeds consistantly 140-160 klm/hr. For all of the trip I will have luggage and for part of the trip I will have my partner and more luggage, so the bike will be loaded.
I have budgetted 2 rears and 1 front.
The bike goes in for it's 10000 klms service next week, and some new sandshoes, soooo
Can anyone give me the tips for good long distance loaded tyres and tyre pressure's.
Thanks folks in advance.

Just a quick note of congratulations for all the viewers here. I dont post often (usually when I need something), but I read this site all the time, and to all the regular posters.... thanks heaps, you guys have given me bags of info on my bike, and sort of feel like long distance, like minded buddies.
Cheers all

Marty from Oz.
This is a bloody big Island
04 KRS Capri Blue ( the fastest colour )
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post #4 of 14 (permalink) Old Sep 5th, 2006, 7:15 pm
 
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I had always assumed that since the front tire and rear tire DO NOT track the same, this accounted for less wear on the rear than the front. Does anyone have any insight into this theory?
1downfourup
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post #5 of 14 (permalink) Old Sep 5th, 2006, 7:37 pm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stephejl
I've seen a lot of posts about tire mileage and the one thing that stands out to me is the belief by many that if rider A gets 9k miles on tire x, they should get 9k miles on tire x. But the bottom line is, the rider and riding style makes MUCH more difference in tire mileage than the tire brand. Sure, other peoples experience with a tire brand is good guidance on whether you'll like it but you shouldn't expect to have the same experience unless you know the guy and know that your riding styles are the same. And I'm not just talking about how fast you go or how low you lean in the twisties.

Tires almost never wear out on the shoulders on the road (I know one racer who lives on a deserted twisty road and wears his shoulder out before the center). So the wear we are concerned about for tire life is the center bead.

Rear tire: In my opinion the single most likely cause of short tire life on a rear tire is agressive downshifting. Down shifts is braking with the rear tire w/o the front. That means the rear tire slows the bike down and causes itself to unweight. There is always slippage. Slippage means wear.

Also overuse of the rear brake causing slippage will severly limit tire mileage.

Agressive starts are 3rd on my list because acceleration weights the rear tire limiting slippage.

Long boring freeway miles, especially on the new roughened freeways will wear the center.

Two up heats the tires more and makes more wear.

Low tire pressure...I'm starting to think 2-5 lbs over recommended pressures is better on dry pavement--but it makes your contact patch smaller so lets save that discussion for another thread.

Front tires

Fronts don't slip or lock up very often so front tire mileage is much more predictable and will likely vary less from rider to rider but the front tire indeed takes more shoulder wear. I've only been riding the K-bike a couple of weeks but the front is heavy and cornering seems to put a lot of force on the front so I'd guess the front won't wear nearly as long on the K-bike as on my R-bike.

I'm hoping others will contribute their ideas about what causes tire wear.

Thanks,
Jerry

my experience supports your theory - i am still on my factory oem m1s after 6500 miles on my k1200s whereas most people riding the same bike report 2000-3000 miles on the same tires and the same bike. i classify myself as a pretty conservative rider - i don't go balls out on curves or pop-up my front end when i accelerate from a stop. i also agree that center wear is usually the culprit in wearing out tires - no matter how many twisties i ride, i usually have to ride far longer on highways.
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post #6 of 14 (permalink) Old Jan 19th, 2007, 9:42 pm
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stephejl
I've seen a lot of posts about tire mileage and the one thing that stands out to me is the belief by many that if rider A gets 9k miles on tire x, they should get 9k miles on tire x. But the bottom line is, the rider and riding style makes MUCH more difference in tire mileage than the tire brand. Sure, other peoples experience with a tire brand is good guidance on whether you'll like it but you shouldn't expect to have the same experience unless you know the guy and know that your riding styles are the same. And I'm not just talking about how fast you go or how low you lean in the twisties.

Tires almost never wear out on the shoulders on the road (I know one racer who lives on a deserted twisty road and wears his shoulder out before the center). So the wear we are concerned about for tire life is the center bead.

Rear tire: In my opinion the single most likely cause of short tire life on a rear tire is agressive downshifting. Down shifts is braking with the rear tire w/o the front. That means the rear tire slows the bike down and causes itself to unweight. There is always slippage. Slippage means wear.

Also overuse of the rear brake causing slippage will severly limit tire mileage.

Agressive starts are 3rd on my list because acceleration weights the rear tire limiting slippage.

Long boring freeway miles, especially on the new roughened freeways will wear the center.

Two up heats the tires more and makes more wear.

Low tire pressure...I'm starting to think 2-5 lbs over recommended pressures is better on dry pavement--but it makes your contact patch smaller so lets save that discussion for another thread.

Front tires

Fronts don't slip or lock up very often so front tire mileage is much more predictable and will likely vary less from rider to rider but the front tire indeed takes more shoulder wear. I've only been riding the K-bike a couple of weeks but the front is heavy and cornering seems to put a lot of force on the front so I'd guess the front won't wear nearly as long on the K-bike as on my R-bike.

I'm hoping others will contribute their ideas about what causes tire wear.

Thanks,
Jerry
This is a really simple question for ME. I've never gotten over 3200 miles out of any kind of rear tire or nearly twice that on the front tire. I use 42 in the rear and 36 in the front off the track with great performance and wear patterns.

It's simply a matter of attacking the twisties and right wrist action, which is how I get my jollies. My rear wears out in the center first, but not by much. Less than 20 per cent of my miles are on the straights and if it were significantly more than that, I would see no use for a motorcycle. But that's just my circumstance.
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post #7 of 14 (permalink) Old Jun 22nd, 2007, 6:09 pm
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i ride some on curvy roads in florida, but mostly like cruising on state and county roads. i get 17-18k miles on a set of tires. my first set, z4's, second set were pirelli diablo strada's and this latest set are z6's. i keep 40psi in front, 44psi in rear. heat IS the culprit..........period!!!!!!!! higher psi, less heat. in my experience, their aint much difference in tire brands, it's all about keeping down the heat.
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post #8 of 14 (permalink) Old Jun 22nd, 2007, 11:38 pm
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Possibly the CG of the bike as well.

I noticed on my old RT the rear tire was shot at around 3-4K. On the new GT they are wearing much better although the front wears out faster. The RT was about two fronts to one rear. The GT wears both about equally.

The only thing I notice is the GT is very front-end heavy where the RT was rear end heavy. The GT needs a front lift just to get the tire to rotate freely to check the pressure. RT was almost perfectly balanced on the center stand.
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post #9 of 14 (permalink) Old Dec 14th, 2008, 3:43 pm
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I don't mean to downplay riding style as a factor in tire wear, but I have not changed riding styles, and notice tremendous differences in tire brands, and tread life. All things being equal tires at right pressure, and all, it comes down to rubber compound, and tread pattern used by the manufacturer. Soft compound= sticky tire which wears quickly, Hard compound= less traction greater wear. Various compounds are effected differently when they heat up as well.

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post #10 of 14 (permalink) Old Apr 20th, 2009, 10:45 pm
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Interco, makers of Super Swampers for 4x4s, has a great page on road surface impact on tire wear.

Seeing as I can wear out a Swamper with over 24/32" of tread faster than the Pilot Sport IIs on my M3, I can see why they came out with this:
http://www.intercotire.com/help-arti...p?article_id=2
Surface Type / Miles

Smooth Asphalt 40000
Coarse Asphalt 36000
Concrete 28000
Extra Coarse Asphalt 24000
Country Road 20000
Crushed Stone 8000

Another reason to avoid super-slab...

08 K1200S (Phreeooow)
06 Husqvarna TE610
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