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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Just picked up a 2000 K1200RS for next to nothing (traded a 2003 Buell XB9R that tried to kill me for it). When I rode it home, it was without a doubt the smoothest bike I've ever ridden.

Now for the issue (the only one I could find) with it - there was some grime on one of the seams. I think it's between the transmission housing and the clutch. I wiped it off and thought nothing of it until the clutch slipped on me on the way to work this morning. Based on my research, it looks like there could be three culprits - clutch fluid, transmission oil, or engine oil.

I checked the fluids that I could (engine oil and clutch fluid), and neither of them seem to be down any. So I'm hoping that this means that it's just the transmission output shaft seal because that's the only fluid that I can't check.

If I have to replace the clutch (which I'm not sure of right now), do I have to replace everything or just the friction plate and clean the rest with brake cleaner or some other degreaser?

I'm taking it to an independent shop next week for an assessment. Hoping it isn't much, because I've got big bills coming up...

Any suggestions?

Thanks!

Edit: It's only slipping in the higher gears (5 and 6) at higher RPMs (over 6K or so). Hope this means that the clutch isn't completely toast...
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks! I’ll give it a shot.

Turns out the problem was a leaky clutch slave cylinder along with the engine being overfilled with oil.
 

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Thanks for starting this thread. I looked at my KRS, and noticed the same leak in the video. Ill give the Coke fix a shot should I experience any slipping.
 

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Why can't you check the transmission oil? Is the filler plug welded shut or something, or is it that you don't have the right size allen wrench?

Sounds to me like the rear main seal leaking. I suppose it could be the tranny input, though. Either way, the back half of the drivetrain has to come apart to access the clutch. You'll know which seal is leaking once you're in there. Not a difficult job, just time consuming (labor $$), and it requires rigging the bike. The centerstand comes out with the tranny, so you need other means to support the bike.
 

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That series of K-bikes had the epic engine output shaft o-ring failure. Which means it's leaked oil into the dry clutch compartment. That means the clutch is toast. And that means removing everything behind the engine. Been there, done that on my 2002 RS at 75K miles. What it needed is a viton o-ring, which is petro resistant, and is not what BMW installed originally, but does offer it now. Sorry for the grim news....

And if that's not the problem...sorry I petrified you!!
 

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Hi Dallas,

Actually Neoprene O rings are very adequately Petroleum resistant. If an O ring fails, it's because the ring groove surfaces got too dirty, too hot or the location de-stabilized from thrust, vibration, or the application needed a larger O ring.

It's cheap-ass Butyl Rubber you want to avoid. That garbage also dissolves in Alcohol which is why we see seals made of it fail because of our garbage Ethanol gas. When they first introduced that distilled Corn crap into our gas, the stuff ate up the Butyl seals of the In-Tank fuel pumps making for some damned big repair bills. Thank you EPA. For the most part, I think Butyl rubber has disappeared from engine parts.

Viton O rings are vastly superior to either and should be installed where ever possible (size and availability permitting). Viton wears better and can withstand a sustained 500 degrees and remain flexible. You can actually use it for head gaskets. I have also used it in it's machinable round stock form which I believe is called Peek (spelling?).

The only reason we haven't seen a complete takeover by Viton is that they are more expensive. My take on it is that if they were 10 times the money, it would be worth it.


You can spot Viton by the Brown color as opposed to Black Neoprene and it is a little more dense which you can feel when squeezing or bending it. If the added denseness is not present, it's probably just made of brown Silicon. I've seen this.
 

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Well my o-ring that failed came on the 2002 RS...right from BMW. And I traded that bike off in 2012 after 133K miles and no more o-ring failures. But everything you posted I'm fully aware of...but thanks....
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Final Fix

Well, as it turns out, it was the rear O-ring that was shot. So I replaced everything in the list in the attached picture. It wasn't cheap, but the clutch isn't slipping anymore. I also ordered the oil-resistant friction disk from Germany so if the leak re-develops it won't leave me stranded and (hopefully) I won't have to replace the clutch.

Thanks for the help!
 

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To correct some of the misconceptions posted above,a Viton O-ring isn't necessarily brown.Black Viton is rather common and so is blue.

Black Viton at my clutch Oring.My recently cleaned fuel injectors came back with spiffy looking blue Viton O-rings and green pintle caps.

The BMW clutch O-ring isn't Viton.I bought another one a couple years ago just to test it.Easy enough to differentiate.....place BMW and VITON side by side on a hard surface and tap with a small hammer.Butyl Bounces and
Viton Thuds.......B=B....T=T.:glasses
 
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