BMW K1200, K1300, and K1600 Forum banner

1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I'm new to this gig and have found a couple bikes I really like.
Is there any significant changes on this bike/years?
Thanks
James
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
296 Posts
2002 on have I-ABS vs ABSII on earlier bikes, with different front brake calipers and pads. The '03 has a wider rear wheel-5.5 inches vs 5.0.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
123 Posts
98-01: ABS without linked and servo assisted brakes. Older style fairing/windshield with detachable front signal pods. 5" rear wheel with 170/60-17 tire. No electronic cruise. Rear shock preload adjustment with a traditional shock wrench. Brembo calipers. Available in the best colors: Dakar Yellow on the 98-99 and Mandarin Yellow on the 00-01.

02-04: Linked and servo assisted ABS brakes. Newer style windshield/fairing with integrated front signals. 5.5" rear wheel with 180/55-17 tire. Electronic cruise. Rear shock preload adjustment with a knob. BMW calipers. Good colors unavailable.

Mine is a 2001 and I like it best mostly for the fact that it does not have linked/servo electronic brakes, plus it has the sexy Italian Brembo calipers. If you take your bike to the dealer for everything, then I guess it doesn't matter. If you like to do everything yourself (like me) then "less is more", especially when it comes to the extremely complex brakes on the later bikes. You will get arguments either way, but I Iove mine just the way it is.

EDIT: The GT was introduced in 2002 and has the same features as the RS with the addition of more stuff, like saddlebags, larger windshield, etc.
 

·
no power in the 'verse can stop me
Joined
·
1,126 Posts
Quite simply, the 2000 model is way better looking. :yesnod:

Aside from the power brakes on the later model, and a couple of
minor odds and ends, the bikes are essentially the same.

Get the one that strikes your fancy ( or budget ) the most.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
123 Posts
NCStephen said:
The 2000 may look good, but the Cruise Control is a VERY VERY nice feature (and black isn't such a bad color)

NCS
I'll give you that one... black is the very best color of the non-yellow colors :yeah:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
104 Posts
My 2000 K12RS came with a 180/55 – 17 and a 5.5” wheel. The owner’s also manual confirms the tire requirement in 180/55-17. To the best of my knowledge the signals are not removable. I have seen no mention of it in the manual and have seen no clasps.



I have test ridden later models with the integrated braking and non-Brembo hardware and I am unimpressed with that system. The ABS intercedes far too early compared to my bike and they lack of user control over how much braking goes to each wheel is also a disappointment. They’ve pretty much ruled out spirited riding IMO. That kind of system seems better suited to something like a 1000 lb full dress touring rig that won’t see a lot of high speed canyon carving.



Another difference on the GT is the addition of cruise control which is handy for avoiding tickets while freeway droning.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
123 Posts
Yoda said:
My 2000 K12RS came with a 180/55 – 17 and a 5.5” wheel. The owner’s also manual confirms the tire requirement in 180/55-17. To the best of my knowledge the signals are not removable. I have seen no mention of it in the manual and have seen no clasps.

Another difference on the GT is the addition of cruise control which is handy for avoiding tickets while freeway droning.
The 2002+ RS bikes also have electronic cruise. At least some of them do, I thought they all did. My friends does.

My 2001 manual lists the 5.5 and 180 rear as "optional".

Does your fairing look like the one in this picture? If so, the black front signal pods pop off. They must be removed to get to to some of the side panel bolts. If your fairing is not like this one, then your bike is not a 2000.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
420 Posts
Personally I like the linked, power assisted brakes and have continued to enjoy them for 7 years. I chose a new 02 over a second hand 01 taxi because of them. Its all personal. Ride them both and make up your own mind. BTW the power assisted linked brakes do take a little getting used to....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
104 Posts
Trout said:
The 2002+ RS bikes also have electronic cruise. At least some of them do, I thought they all did. My friends does.

My 2001 manual lists the 5.5 and 180 rear as "optional".

Does your fairing look like the one in this picture? If so, the black front signal pods pop off. They must be removed to get to to some of the side panel bolts. If your fairing is not like this one, then your bike is not a 2000.

Yes my signal lights look like that. And now that you mention it I think it's possible the dealer may have said something about an optional wide rear tire when I bought it. I'll take a look at my service manual on how to pop off the pods. I'm pretty sure there's no mention of it in the owners' manual.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
283 Posts
No Drops...Lucky!

Wow, that means you have NEVER dropped yours? Lucky! Mine have popped off enough through drops or all the work I have done over the years that I had to replace the piece of the pod that contains the baskets for attachment. I now have it down to be able to remove the body panel without removing the pod, as that upper screw is on the inside by the oil cooler. The owners manual does not mention or describe them coming off, just tells you how to replace the bulb on pages 2-44 & 45. I also agree that Black is a GREAT color. So much so that seeing the adv. in the latest Cycle World actually has me considering the new S1000RR............
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
104 Posts
Y2K12RS said:
Wow, that means you have NEVER dropped yours? Lucky! Mine have popped off enough through drops or all the work I have done over the years that I had to replace the piece of the pod that contains the baskets for attachment. I now have it down to be able to remove the body panel without removing the pod, as that upper screw is on the inside by the oil cooler. The owners manual does not mention or describe them coming off, just tells you how to replace the bulb on pages 2-44 & 45. I also agree that Black is a GREAT color. So much so that seeing the adv. in the latest Cycle World actually has me considering the new S1000RR............
Never laid down a street bike in my life. Of course I've fallen off dirt bikes about a gazillion times, though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
513 Posts
There are some BMW options that could be had with some model years. I did not write them down and have had way to many canadain wiskeys to remember them all but here goes:
rear suspension (BMW offers a Sport Suspension it has a differant color spring)
heated grips
lugage rack
Side bags
rear tire size and rim 5'' vs 5.5" pre 2004
ABS brakes pre 2002
heated seat ?
Cruise control
Colors

There maybe more or less.

As far as going down;
I have been down (more than once) (track downs don't count)
I plan to be down again
I have not been hit and I did not hit. (that does not rule out it that it will not happen)

Peidmont Red makes for the fasted color (untill I repaint it)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
This is a long article but interesting. It compares the '98-'01 models with the newer '02 model (made through model year 2004):

Better bahnburner: The 2002 BMW K1200RS. (RIDDEN & RATED).(Evaluation)
Rider - December 1, 2001
Mark Tuttle Jr.


When BMW redesigned its K-RS four-cylinder sport-tourer for 1998 (see the full test in Rider, August 1997), the German company came just inches away from grabbing the sport-touring brass ring. That stellar, all-new K1200RS had sharp handling, awesome power and torque, incredible brakes and--most importantly--the infamous buzzy vibration in its predecessor was nowhere to be found. BMW's Telelever front end and Paralever shaft drive gave the new bike good suspension compliance without sacrificing the benefits of the rigid new alloy frame, with less fork dive under braking and little if any shaft-drive jacking as well. New bodywork not only looked better, it worked better, too, by providing increased rider protection, usable mirrors and a two-position windscreen. Yep, the 1998 K1200RS was a stunning achievement for BMW at the time perhaps the best bike in its lineup, and we were eventually able to show our appreciation in 2001 by naming it Top Sport-Touring Motorcycle.
Of course, we weren't without complaint. First on the list was weight. Though arguably in a class of its own by virtue of the features BMW had included on the K1200RS--a unique, liquid-cooled, DOHC, flat in-line four with fuel injection and Paralever shaft final drive, Telelever front end and ABS brakes, for example--BMW didn't leave anything off the 1998 K1200RS, either. At 628 pounds fully gassed, it ended up closer in heft to bikes like BMW's own R1l00RT and the Honda ST1100 than sportier tourers such as the Triumph Sprint ST and Honda VFR800FI.
Then there was the little problem of rider comfort. BMW was to be commended for giving the new bike an adjustable seat, handlebars and footpegs, but even set in their most comfortable positions the K1200RS was still too racy for a big sport tourer, like a Honda CBR that had been on a horrific carbohydrate binge.
Fortunately, for once Rider wasn't a lone voice in the sport-touring wilderness, as both the praise for the K1200RS overall and the outcry over its weight and torture-rack ergonomics were almost universal. As a result a factory "Comfort Kit" for the bike was offered shortly after its intro (see May 1998), and now, just four model years later (a heartbeat for BMW), we have an upgraded version of the bike with a fairing facelift, larger windscreen, 1.2-inch lower (overall) adjustable footpegs and the adjustable Comfort handlebars as standard equipment. Despite the addition of electronic cruise control, BMW's new Integral ABS anti-lock braking system--in this case the partially integrated one--is so much lighter than the previous ABS II that the new bike weighs about eight pounds less overall.
The K-RS is still a big bike, and this is what first strikes you upon swinging a leg over and hoisting it off the sidestand. It helps that the old, over-long reach to the bars is no longer required, and with the seat in the highest and footpegs in the lowest of two positions, male riders of average build now have plenty of legroom yet can still easily reach the ground at stops. The more vertically challenged can simply put the seat in the 1.2-inch lower position. If for some reason you long for the sportier ergos of the previous model, well, simply raise the pegs and lower the bars--it's your back. Our only gripe with this latest ergonomic formula is that the seat requires balletlike finesse to latch in the higher position, but once there most riders will probably leave it anyway.
Push the starter button and the new K1200RS jumps to life without the need for a choke or fast-idle control, and this latest version of the Bosch Motronic electronic fuel injection and ignition provides smooth power delivery from idle up to the bike's 9,500-rpm redline. Float like a butterfly or sting like a 620-pound bumblebee, with this much smooth power and twisting torque on tap, the six-speed K1200RS may be big, but flat hustles when you ask it to, even with a full load. On the Borla Performance Dynojet dyno our West Coast test bike made 114 horsepower at the rear wheel and 79.5 pounds-feet of peak torque, with 70-plus pounds-feet available from 4,000-8,500 rpm. The engine and running gear may not have been changed since the '98 model's introduction, but as you can see, there's wasn't much reason to.
All of this power did require BMW to mount a non-adjustable steering stabilizer on the bike, and at low speeds it causes the steering to "hunt" slightly, as if the head bearings were too tight. It's easily gotten used to, though, and most riders won't even notice it. Elsewhere the K1200RS' handling is excellent for such a heavy bike, with fat, long-wearing but sticky radials on wide cast wheels. Recalibrated Sport suspension for 2002 is compliant yet taut, and has a broad range of adjustment out back.
Up front the sexier new fairing upper is said to be more aerodynamic, too, and integrates the radiator into a classic BMW kidney grille. There's still plenty of wind protection for your hands and lower arms, and new mirrors are larger and mounted on sleeker stalks. The windscreen is the most noticeable improvement, as its total area is up by 20 percent, and on the road the higher of its two positions provides an almost still pocket for your upper body. As the windblast still catches you about helmet height, however, you will want to wear earplugs.
Perhaps the best new feature of the K1200RS is the standard electronic cruise control, which works flawlessly and in conjunction with the new seating position to dramatically increase rider comfort on the long haul. The switch is easily reached with your left thumb, and can seemingly be set in any gear at any speed and fine-tuned just like the system on BMW's K1200LT luxotourer.
We've talked at length about the technical details of the K1200RS' other controversial new feature, Integral ABS, in BMW road tests in the July 2001 issue. The partially integrated system on the K1200RS--in which the front lever actuates both the front and rear opposed four-piston calipers in the triple-disc setup, and the rear pedal actuates only the rear--works best among the versions we've tried, as applying the right amount of front brake on twisting roads doesn't take an undue amount of care. It's still less linear than the typical competition's, however, and in our view the increase in stopping power over the previous braking setup on this bike isn't worth the reduced control.
Overall, though, the 2002 K1200RS is an even better bahnburner. In addition to all the nice new stuff, the centerstand is still a breeze to use, levers remain adjustable and the instrumentation is the most complete of any bike with which we're familiar. The new mirrors are clear at all engine and road speeds, and best of all, this great bike can now be enjoyed on an all-day or even all-year ride in comfort.
So, does it get the brass ring this time? At 620 pounds wet and $16,990 (650 pounds and $18,315 with the optional hard bags, luggage rack and tankbag on our test bike), it's still heavy, and expensive to boot. But boy, nothing else comes quite as close. We just may be seeing the Kl200RS once again when it's time for Rider's Top Ten awards for '02
RELATED ARTICLE: 2002 BMW K1200RS
Base Price: $16, 990 ($18, 315 as tested)
Engine Type: Liquid-cooled, longitudinal flat in-line four, DOHC, 4 valves per cyl.
Bore x Stroke: 70.5 x 75.0mm
Displacement: 1, 171 cc
Transmission: 6-speed, hydraulically actuated dry clutch
Final Drive: Shaft, 2.75:1
Wheelbase: 61.0 in.
Rake/Trail: 27.25 degrees/4.9 in.
Seat Height: 30.3/31.5 in.
Wet Weight: 620 lbs.
Fuel Capacity: 5.5 gals., last 1.0 gal. warning light on
Average mpg: 37.5


Citation Details
Title: Better bahnburner: The 2002 BMW K1200RS. (RIDDEN & RATED).(Evaluation)
Author: Mark Tuttle Jr.
Publication: Rider (Magazine/Journal)
Date: December 1, 2001
Publisher: Ehlert Publishing Group
Volume: 28 Issue: 12 Page: 42(3)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
^^^^ very good read, Thank you ^^^^
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Top