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two K1300S bikes, S1000R & Vespa 150 Primavera clown paint job
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Even BMW says the engine is capable of "Adaptations". All interesting. I do like how the booster plug helps in throttle transitions. Takes a lot of many parts cooperating to keep things go. Kind of explains some of the hassles of the K12 series and the K1300GT bikes. Some of them are just fine and a few are real disappointments for their owners.
 

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In your post you say
"Botus says the O2 sensor (air temp) tweak of the Booster Plug "

The O2 sensor and the air temp sensor are different sensors.
the booster plug on a later refinement, has a remote air temp sensor as well - the idea on all of them is to lie to the ECU that the ambient air temp is colder than it is (to richen the mixture) - the idea on later designs was so it has a better understanding of the real temps to do the compensation better than one brand that gets cooked sitting beside the engine (thus getting confused about when to help)

I had one on my R1200GS LC, within 10 miles of fitting it, its effects were already being taken out - On the Air cooled GS it was a basket base of no use whatsoever

I'll dig out some mega info on how the AF-XIED work later... from another forum some guys where helping me out on my bike, and explained LOTS of detail how it works
 

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I have no issues with throttle transitions, and I can't imagine this engine ever presenting the impression of power deficit, and I've been living with low speed "surging" behavior ever since I bought the oilhead in '93...

But having the engine simply stop running when it shouldn't has put me in mortal peril more than once.

I really should follow through a NHTSA complaint regardless of whether one of these gadgets fixes the problem. BMW deserves to be punished for failing to remedy a serious safety defect that is clearly not a 1-off problem with this machine. BTW I met a rider in Colorado last summer who described virtually identical behavior on his R1200GS.

I'm now studying Jens Lyck's BoosterPlug Fuel Injection Book.pdf that was posted here the other day, to make a more educated decision about which device to install. I have one of each on my workbench. After the previous conversations on this thread and Mike's "explanation" (which didn't explicitly claim AF-XIED would solve "stalling", just "the lean fueling" which is presumably the root cause, and that the bike won't eventually "adjust it out"), I went ahead an ordered the AF-XIED.

Might install today but won't have any answers right away; while this morning is nicely rideable -- overnight rain even washed the salt off the roads -- I won't be putting it back together until I also install the starter harness (hint hint @Meese).
 

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"Lambda, fueling and AF-XIED for Dummies" by knutk on ukgser's site, with minor tweaks by me
Emission regulations require engines to limit pollution. It's a fairly complex picture, but let's focus on the subject that annoys us, the fueling of the engine, or rather, a lack of fuel it needs to run well.

Background: Lambda vs AFR (air fuel ratio)

In an ideal world, perfect combustion for an engine is when every drop of gasoline finds an oxygen molecule to bond with, so when the mixture is ignited, every drop of gasoline burns, with no excess.

To understand how well the vehicle is coping (with the fueling its receiving from the various parameters its measuring, mapped to a list of what to inject under which conditions), it analyses the combustion. To do this the manufacturer installs an O2 sensor in the exhaust system. The O2 sensor reacts to the amount of vacant (unused) oxygen molecules. And when there's no remaining oxygen in the exhaust, this condition is defined as Lambda 1.0. For a gasoline engine, Lambda 1.0 will be reached when the AFR is at the stoichiometric 14.7:1, i.e 14.7g of air to 1g of gasoline.

So why mess with Lambda, rather than the AFR?

The O2 sensor is searching for excessive oxygen. Different types of gasoline (with ethanol etc) may offer different AFRs. However, regardless of what type of gasoline the engine is burning Lambda 1 will ALWAYS be the condition where all the oxygen is used.

To reduce confusion, we'll stick to common gasoline offering an AFR of 14.7 for Lambda 1 and debate how a Narrow band (NB) O2 sensor works in BMW boxers up to the introduction of the 1250 shiftcam engine - (which uses a different sensor type.)

The Picture below is borrowed from NightRider who produce the AF-XIED. Its showing the output of a Narrow Band sensor when warm, where the O2 sensors emit voltage in accordance with this chart below.

The scales of AFR are adjusted to reflect gasoline that produces Lambda 1 at AFR 14.7 and the picture shows the varying O2 sensor voltage outputs when subjected to differing AFR values. The three different coloured curves show the voltage output also changes with temperature. Noting, when you look along the 0.5V line, all three curves deliver the same voltage around an AFR of 14.6 - 14.8.

The ECU uses this O2 sensor feedback to know if the engine is running too lean or too rich. Whilst expecting the standard engine map and its long term adaptions to land a voltage from the sensor around 0.5V / 0.6V (AFR 14.7). With a 0.8V output, the AFR is down to 14.2-ish. and from there on, the voltage reading vs AFR become less accurate. However the ECU isn't interested in the voltage and doesn't care if its above or below 0.5V. The ECU only sees richer than or leaner than the AFR 14.7 target (even when the voltage output slightly varies with AFR in a highly non-linear manner).

When running, the amount of fuel injected is calculated from tables inside the ECU (called maps, hence remapping means changing the value in these tables). The tables offer information on how long (time in milliseconds ) the injectors are to be opened, depending on RPM, throttle position etc. There are actually several maps, but for simplicity lets just say there are preinstalled maps.

So fuel is delivered according to the maps. However, in order to fine tune the fueling, the O2 sensor offers feedback on the combustion. These small adjustments, called for by the O2 sensor, are called Short Term Trim, and it is basically a number that adds or subtracts to whatever time value is being used opening the injectors.

But keep in mind, the exhaust reflects the result after the combustion, i.e the O2 sensor will not tell ECU what to do. It tells the ECU how it did. Let's say the air filter is clogging up, restricting the airflow to the cylinder. Now, the pre-determined values from the maps will give the engine too much fuel, since the engine gets less air than expected. And the O2 sensor will tell the engine that the fueling is too rich, thus it needs to trim down on the amount of fuel. In a steady condition, this will work pretty well, but it will always need a couple of strokes of the piston in order to first analyse, and then inform if too lean or rich in a continuous process on and on.

Now if its always getting things wrong and reacting to it that's pretty stupid. So in comes the Long term trim (adaptions): At every condition (rpm vs throttle position), the Short term trim will be stored. It's tendency for richening or leaning is stored in small steps. But the point is, if a given condition consistently calls for a need of adjustment, this adjustment will be stored in the Long Term Trim table. And this table is part of the equation when the ECU collects data from different maps in order to determine the fueling. BMW calls the Long Term Trim the Adaptive map This is the map that gets zeroed out when ever BMW talks about restoring the adaptive values (wiping the adaptions).

So, what does the AF-XIED do, and how?

If we take a look at the curve below, the curve shows the voltage from a warm O2 sensor, and this is what the ECU receives. (Data from a -15 LC boxer) with time in seconds along the bottom



Up to 10 seconds, the engine is running on a steady throttle. After 10 seconds the engine is accelerating.

In the first 10 seconds, the voltage from O2 sensor flickers between 0.1V and up to 0.9V. When the voltage is < 0.5 V the ecu notices its 'Lean' and it will add a small amount of fuel. Then it keeps adding fuel until the O2 voltage reads >0.5V. Now it's too rich, so reduce the fueling. This is done by correcting the short term trim.

At the 10 second time mark, the throttle is opened up. Now we see that the voltage jumps up to a steady 0.9V. Refer the table of O2 sensor voltage output vs AFR. The green curve reflects the 1200F temp of the O2 sensor, a fairly common condition, i.e when adding throttle, the AFR is richened to 13.6.

What is the big deal about 13.6? Well, the world is not perfect, hence in order to utilise all the oxygen molecules, we actually need to throw in some extra fuel for good measure. Practical tests have shown that adding a bit more fuel will make sure all the O2 molecules get their share of gas, and more molecules with fuel + O2 mixed means a more powerful burn during combustion, i.e more power

The point I'm trying to say is: Any tuning of the engine that only involves controlling the fuel to air mixture will offer very little top end power, as the ECU OEM fueling already offers the added fuel at full throttle (Full throttle has not been the focus of emission control, even if that may change in the future).
Tuning involving changing the AFR will benefit when the throttle isn't fully open, as in the condition in the first ten seconds of the chart above. And generally, when throttle is opened up in the higher range (the limit varies depending of the type of engine).

Here is where the AF-XIED shines:

Have a look at the chart below. It shows what the AF-XIED at setting 8 does to the engine.
Red curve is the voltage from the O2 sensor and now being analyzed by the AF-XIED, the blue curve shows the voltage produced by the AF-XIED and transmitted to the engine.



The Voltage from the O2 sensor (the red line) is read by the AF-XIED, and it stops this data reaching the BMW ECU. However the AF-XIED analyses the voltage creating the blue curve, and transmits this to the ECU. The ECU has no knowledge about the fittment of the AF-XIED, and behaves as if its direct feedback from the O2 sensor.

Remember: High voltage = Rich. Low Voltage = Lean.
If we amplify the red curve, we will notice that every time the red curve drops below a straight line, the AF-XIED signals a low voltage to the ECU (And Low voltage = Lean condition). The ECU gets a Lean condition signal and reacts to it by richening the fuel. But, we don't want the fuel to go excessively rich, so when the red curve rises slightly above the straight line, (hence going to rich), it's time to stop the ECU richening the fuel mix. And this is done by the AF-XIED increasing the voltage emulating the O2 sensor. Where the voltage output follows the actual O2 sensor voltage and sends this to the ECU. The ECU will react to this richer than 0.5 V condition by once again starting to lean the mix, and on and on....

AF-XIED tweaks are more clever than you may think

The OEM variation between lean and rich being so slow actually does not reflect Bosch's ability for accurate control. Rather its a deliberate need to feed the CAT with oxygen (as CATs use oxygen to convert CO to CO2). Its delivered to the CAT through the exhaust and is controlled to produce periods with excessive O2 in order to feed the CAT. Hence the slow reaction time that allows for periods with too much oxygen. So you should set the AF-XIED to a value rich enough for a smooth running, and no more. Which is why they recommend going from a low value and slowly increasing during set up, one step at a time. And the point of allowing time (100 miles or more) between each change allowing the ECU to rebuild the Long Term Trim each time the setting has been changed. Note: these only save to the ECUs adaptions if the key is off for 10 seconds (and I believe after reaching operating temperature and its been run through all gears).
 

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Thanks @botus for "Lambda, fueling and AF-XIED for Dummies" . I qualify as a dummy. In fact, to paraphrase my favorite "Ghost Rider" Neil Peart,

"What a dummy I used to be. (The truest words I ever wrote, and they get truer every day.)"

RE: "the things are gutless dogs with no go anywhere - unless you wait six years for the needle to get past 8k where it wakes up"

Fair enough although that's precisely the reason I've always felt so comfortable on the K1300S, feeling like I'd been riding it for years during my very first test ride. My oldest riding buddy phrased it this way in describing his wife's K1200GT Dave: "A perfectly well-behaved 100 hp motorcycle until you get to 8k". It's why I say my bike is schizophrenic; she's Therese below 8k, at which point Scarlett emerges.

Larry eventually sold Dave out from under Jana -- over her objections -- because fears of maintainability cost as it aged. He put her on a camhead R1200RT. One day we traded off because I wanted to see what the RT was like and when we stopped for gas I knew exactly what she'd say: "I miss Dave!"

ANYWAY

I'm still looking for a short unambiguous answer as to which device will best solve my stalling problem? I'm assuming any other effects either positive or negative will pale compared to the elimination of that one safety defect. Maybe either of these gadgets would do the trick.

I'd developed a less-than-confident conclusion that the BoosterPlug probably would and AF-XIED might (but might not because if it's doing closed loop corrections but my problem occurs in closed OPEN loop mode -- right?).

Now you've introduced me to the terms "long term trim" and "short term trim" and I get the general idea but I'm still uncertain about what device is best for my specific problem.
 

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I'm still looking for a short unambiguous answer as to which device will best solve my stalling problem? I'm assuming any other effects either positive or negative will pale compared to the elimination of that one safety defect. Maybe either of these gadgets would do the trick.
as made mine never stalled, but it was a bit rough and ready and gutless, I had asked before I bought approved used that they do the full I-level software update (as they added the alarm they had to have it plugged in anyway). But the lazy crooks didn't bother, whilst doing the work coding in the alarm it FAKES an I-Level update, I knew the part numbers of the later ZFE software, instrument cluster software and the engine map (I've written it on these forums loads of times, USA and UK get the same map on the K1300GT), and I could see they never bothered to update them.

Then the rear ABS wires snapped (like they all do) and the ASR went mad. Went to a proper dealership and they sorted it and updated the whole bike fully. When they gave it back it ran like a dog, didn't want to idle correctly and stalled twice on the 20 mile trip home and seemed slower. I didn't know then about the way the later map responds when given the correct super unleaded fuel or the need to gently rebuild adaptions over 200 miles or so. Shame they don' t bother to let owners know about the need !!!

Once it settled down it never stalled again. And with the later map it was far smoother but a fraction slower down the bottom (using cheap fuel). For NVH it feels like the difference between one needing a big service and one that's just had it. But fill with super unleaded its smoother still, and massively faster below 6k RPM, like +20% more lively. If I still had it, I'd do as I wrote earlier, fill with super unleaded and wipe out the mostly full of junk, obsolete historic rubbish that's clogging its brain and build a nice set of decent adaptions properly.

The Booster plug is fake, it works for a few miles and adapts out doing nothing and you need the fuel tank off to fit it. The AF-XIED can be fitted far more eaisly and it can't be adapted out. The bike's electronics just do exactly what they should, but meanwhile the engine gets the fueling it needs to run well. Completely resolving the joke emission friendly - but dangerous (gutless - wobble all over the road) stupidity BMW have to install. People need to realise you don't need to die / suffer trying to live with it.

Do any of you really think any journalist has ever ridden an emission legal BMW loaned out for magazine testing ?... Nor have most of you road testing the ones the dealer's have available for test rides (they just aren't allowed to talk about it) !!!

the gist is they don't stall - therefore you have a fault, find and fix it would be the correct approach - after that they can be made to run better with the later map, only using super unleaded and with something that fixes the overly lean running conditions, And the cheapest, and best approach that leaves ALL the BMW features in play adjusting for temps, weather, altitude, adaptions etc. just as BMW intended is the AF-XIED of which, unlike a GS you only need one of on the K1300... its a no brainer !!!
 

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Does anybody know if a Brentune might fix any of these problems ?.

there is a method (which brentune use) that gets at the "adaption" section of the map and pushes BMW's own fine tuning adjustments to its limits. I do not understand how they can then lock these so the bike keeps them in place and doesn't just wind them back out over time (maybe it does???) Or maybe it was a feature inside the BMW ECU they found that locks it in.

IT DOES NOT REMAP ANYTHING AND IS THE WRONG WAY TO TRY AND FIX THE GLITCHES

this fake it idea can't actually do it properly, it only masks some of the emission induced mess and YES it will feel better and make a bit more go. But as BMW "adaptions" can only go so far you can't do what the AF-XIEDs do. The brentune is a $50 dollar bodge up for crazy money (and the adjustments are actually "a bunch of Italian moped riding computer geeks guessing a few generic bodge ups that should work"). Its costs a fortune and if the adaptions are wiped its all wiped, and if the Map is updated the brentune is now totally wrong and needs to start over.

where's the issue ? AF-XIEDs work to perfection (try understanding by reading why in post 64) virtually every other idea out there is a whole host of NASTY CHEAP BODGES that only help a little bit.

there's another UK place with a mega reputation who also bodge up the adaptions. "hilltop" do a cheap generic about right bodge up, or the posher dyno bodge up for another $150. I can imagine if you had the AF-XIEDs in place and set well, then did this dyno adaption bodge up (where if they can get at the ignition timing) it will be the best of both worlds
 

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Thanks @botus ... that was definitely unambiguous! Maybe not "short" but I'm infamous for grafting tangentially relevant stories and mellifluous wordsmithing into my own posts so I dare not complain 😉

FWIW I believe my software (v2018-07-500) is as updated as it can "officially" get; but I also have no reason to think it includes anything "unofficial" that could for example tweak a demo bike into behaving better at the cost of violating emissions regulations. Latest official dealer inspection (last September by the same guy who set up my R1100RS in '93...he's been doing nothing but BMW MCs for decades and is this dealer's only mechanic; his mechatronic training is up to date) said all the throttle hardware including idle actuator is in excellent order and my GS-911 scans indicate this as well -- though there IS a known problem with the exhaust flap actuator motor. Nobody seems to think that's the issue and after I experimented by disconnecting the flap cable, I don't think so either.

All the service reps at every dealership I've ever thrown this problem at cast shade on the generally poor quality of USA fuels. I've always taken that with a grain of salt, suspecting it was a convenient excuse for their inability to resolve the issue. Maybe it really is specifically and exclusively the root cause. But if BMW can't make a motor that can deal with it, they shouldn't sell them here.

I use "premium top tier" fuel, generally 93 octane (R+M/2), although when touring I'm often obliged to take what I can get and off-brand 91 or even 89 is sometimes the best available. I've occasionally tested "pure" gasoline hoping for a magic bullet. This is nearly always of lower octane than ethanol-adulterated premium from adjacent pumps; it's often referred to as "Rec 90": 90 octane for recreational (i.e. off-road) vehicles. In Canada, Shell high octane is ethanol-free -- but I haven't been to Canada on this bike in years and haven't ridden it there enough to know if it might be a solution. 108 octane race fuel I used once in Arizona ran great but that was only a single tankful; maybe it left a residual benefit, because indeed I had no stalling for the next couple thousand miles.

It's entirely possible my stalling problem is sporadically absent yet sporadically severe purely as a consequence of fuel quality variation. In Montrose, Colorado I refilled with 93 octane "premium" and the bike instantly began running abysmally whereas prior to that stop it had been quite happy. Eventually it got better but never to the point I could ride without the assumption a stall might happen any time I chopped the throttle or even rolled it off gradually.

If the effect of a single tank of poor quality fuel can resonate long afterward, it would explain a lot. It might also make the problem virtually impossible to resolve, so hopefully the AF-XIED can do it.

Thanks for the head's up about "the rear ABS wires snapped (like they all do)". That's a new one to me.

Cheers!
 

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FWIW I believe my software (v2018-07-500) is as updated as it can "officially" get;
last engine map was about in 2012 or earlier - but use motoscan app and check the actual ECU engine map part number - as I-Level isn't always real

said all the throttle hardware including idle actuator is in excellent order
when wiping the adaptions using the GS911 wifi (red one) the current software wipes the adaptions then reset throttle body stepper motor idle calibration - this OFTEN improves idle stability - it takes 30 seconds to do both, then go for a gentle ride and it will be running better. But only saves the changes with key out for 10 seconds

However carb balance is still a point (yes we call it throttle bottle body balance) - but its the same thing, having serviced the bike, get it warm get the throttle butterflies OFF the stepper motors !!! holding around 2 to 3k via the throttle cables, and using vacuum gauges check and adjust till all the same, then snap the throttle open and closed, wiggle the bars, go for a ride and do it all again - it will have changed !!! Then reset throttle body stepper motor idle calibration. It should idle correctly.

my GS-911 scans indicate this as well -- though there IS a known problem with the exhaust flap actuator motor. Nobody seems to think that's the issue and after I experimented by disconnecting the flap cable, I don't think so either.
the exhaust flap valve is NOT really about noise, its trying to give the same effect as variable valve timing. To make big power the K1300S runs quite big valve overlap (both inlet and exhaust open at the same time) this means all the fuel falls out and its gutless down the bottom. Or you fix that and its gutless at the top. The flap valve like EXUP on Yamaha, gives a bit of effect keeping some or the fuel air mixture inside the engine to burn at lower revs, thus keeping emissions lower and power up a LITTLE bit.

If its not working its either losing something at higher or lower revs. People make a plug in bodge to lie its connected and working. The K1300GT doesn't have this exhaust valve, I don't know if the ECU outputs are impacted by this working on the K1300S or not - one would hope there is a connection - ought to be. So you ought to want it working correctly. Shift cam is doing what this flap doesn't really do well, nicely

All the service reps at every dealership I've ever thrown this problem at cast shade on the generally poor quality of USA fuels. I've always taken that with a grain of salt,
Only buy the good stuff then? the difference in performance between good and great is staggering - after filling the tank it literally starts up with a different engine tone and rips down the road on the good stuff. If you buy the lowest it will run really badly.

Bare in mind USA does its Octane numbering quite differently (much of the rest of the world use this system)
91 can't even buy it here (its was what the eastern block used to get - and its nasty)
93 high altitude fuel used in the Highveld in South Africa >5000 foot (lower rating, as less air went in the engine due to lower atmos pressure at altitude)
95 normal unleaded, K1300's will drop power output
97 no change over normal unleaded
99 big boy real fuel for engine's designed to take it. (Put this is a bike that was meant to get 95 and it should feel smoother, but it will make less go)

If the effect of a single tank of poor quality fuel can resonate long afterward, it would explain a lot.
Its a big tank, do five 50 miles trips and it will impact long term trims a bit...

Thanks for the head's up about "the rear ABS wires snapped (like they all do)". That's a new one to me.
BMW diagnotics don't pick up this fault. The ABS isn't as sensitive to the readings from both front and rear ABS sensors as the ASR system. The wheel speed readings doing different stuff as far as the bike knows could be differing levels of grip and thus brakes each wheel independently. So a funny reading from a Rear sensor might be considered lock up / slip under braking rather than a faulty output from the sensor. But the ASR within limits is expecting the same speed data from each wheel and when it doesn't get, it cuts back engine output. When the signals are wrong enough that it can't be engine output, the ASR throws its teddies and flags the error. But due to the way the system works it doesn't know which sensor is throwing funny data. So the diagnostics just finds a fault list for ASR and picks the first on the list .... which happens to say front sensor readings implausible.

Everyone needs to know how to turn off ASR, or you can be stuck broken down at the roadside, with an unridable bike waiting for support - when it only takes 1 seconds to turn off the system and ride home normally.
 

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That's a lot of great info @botus , thanks for reading my post & taking the time!

"motoscan app"
Don't have that, guess I need it.

"GS911 wifi (red one)"
Got that.

"But only saves the changes with key out for 10 seconds"
I don't quite understand the procedure you're recommending here, can you clarify it "for dummies"?

"get it warm get the throttle butterflies OFF the stepper motors !!!"
Will make it a point to do the idle calibration on a warm motor. Maybe THAT would be the magic bullet!

"go for a ride and do it all again - it will have changed"
The throttle body assembly says BING on it so that's to be expected.

The SHORT version of this rant starts with '70s Husqvarnas. My dad had a 360 then a 450WR; I had a 125CR (stolen), 175WR, and finally a 250CR; my sister's 250WR might have been the best of the lot. Dad figured out early the answer to poor starting and fouling plugs by the carton was to always & immediately throw away the OEM Bing (my 125 had an Amal, which was maybe worse) and replace it with a Mikuni and a reed valve. On my R60/6 I installed nearly-new 26mm DellOrtos from a co-worker's 500 Moto Morini; he'd fitted it with a single 36mm Mikuni downdraft, complaining his dealer never got the DellOrtos working right. On the R60 I immediately picked up 4 mpg, they stayed in synch, and the choke lever/cable set for an R90S fit perfectly, eliminating ticklers pissing gas all over. On my R80/7 I never got around to replacing the "flat top" BING CVs (even people who actually like Bings think those were crap) with a pair of used Mikunis I bought, but I did salvage a pair of "dome tops" from a friend's crashed R90/6. When the throttle bodies on my brand new R1100RS went out of synch every few thousand miles I LITERALLY said to myself, "Sh1t, this thing might as well have Bings!" Later I noticed BING cast into the bottom of the TB...when the RH throttle shaft/bore wore out I was so disgusted I installed a set of Lectron carbs and ran with them for several years. Eventually I bought a new RH TB and rebuilt the LH and reinstalled FI, but I suspect I might have had a much better experience with Mikunis or DellOrtos instead of Lectrons.

"exhaust flap valve...Yamaha"
My friend Larry liked to call it "the Yamaha valve" just to annoy his service rep.

I won't say it's "not working" but servomotor fault 10313 always recurs not long after clearing codes. After riding with the cable disconnected & flap WFO, it would be obvious if it wasn't working at all so it's definitely working to some degree at least most of the time...

"USA does its Octane numbering quite differently"
Right, what I report as 93 would be ~98 elsewhere in the World, according to one tech sheet I looked at. Still, in USA it's loaded with ethanol and who knows what else, and true quality is often questionable -- especially out in the boondocks where the best rides are.

Cheers!
 

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Motoscan - Don't have that, guess I need it.
GS911 wifi on mobile app shows the part number of the engine ECU - probably does on the desktop one

whilst motoscan is supposed to support wiping adaptions - I can't fit it. But its there on the GS911,and it now jumps from wiping though to automatically clunking and whirring the stepper motor screws... they are are no more than an electric motor wobbling the butterflies open and closed trying to get it to idle. As I understand it calibration winds them full in and full out and settles on what it thinks is a normal midway point.

I don't quite understand the procedure you're recommending here, can you clarify it "for dummies"?
the bike will auto tune in the background every ride, both short term "shit that's not right - take this" to long term, "ah, I can make life easier in the long run, lets have a bit of this forever". But if you don't take the key out and leave it out for at least 10 seconds it doesn't save anything. And if you see the GS911 it says to run through each gear after wiping... but you can wait till you've been for a ride. I take that as meaning nothing gets saved till its at least been running through every gear. This makes lots of sense. If you keep running it when stationary throughout winter on cold start flooding the bike and generally causing more damage than leaving it alone - it won't save the mess you have been busy creating.

Its cumulative on the long term trims, so it tweaks a bit, remembers, tweaks a bit more, on and on and on.... on yours if you've been feeding it shit fuel, had service / running issues it will have remembered all that shit too... so wiping is a good thing now and then...

My friend Larry liked to call it "the Yamaha valve" just to annoy his service rep.
:)

I won't say it's "not working" but servomotor fault 10313 always recurs not long after clearing codes. After riding with the cable disconnected & flap WFO, it would be obvious if it wasn't working at all so it's definitely working to some degree at least most of the time...
sounds like its wrong - maybe if you disconnect wobble and lube it about and set the cable slop right, it'll get over itself - it ought to do a movement this way and that each time just so it knows where it is / keep things clean?

Right, what I report as 93 would be ~98 elsewhere in the World, according to one tech sheet I looked at. Still, in USA it's loaded with ethanol and who knows what else, and true quality is often questionable
in the UK 97 was the expensive super unleaded for years, BUT is not the other side of 98 so the bike doesn't notice, 99 on the other hand is night and day
 

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just to keep you guys aware of potential better ways forward....

I've been nagging one of the best remapping companies to wake up and start on BMWs - they started to get their act together (cover the R nienty aircooled bike now and just added the 1250 LC, I would expect they will add others now they've got their head around the madness that's inside BMW engine ECUs)

https://www.woolichracing.co.uk/prod...x#productTable

This bit below was specifically for a forum on the 1250LC, but deliberate emission and noise control glitches have been relevant on any motorcycle built after 1975

AF-XIED will sort the fuelling, but in today's world with children's exhausts and a" flap to make it sound good" its not just fuelling that broken.

They must meet emission and noise regs and all manu build in massive dips and glitches in the power curves. One old test was full throttle in second gear past a noise meter at 40 or something mph. So the nasty fuelling is alongside ignition retardation and these days on fly by wire nanny control, with a slight closure of the throttle too - ALL 100% designed to fake the emission and noise regs at the point they measure them - hence the woolich method will unlock how the engineers built it and spent all their time enjoying it - and of course as released to the press launch

woolich features you can alter on the 1250 - there's one hell of a clue in the first 4 I've made bold here

TPS Fuel Maps
Ignition Timing Maps
Electronic Throttle Valve (ETV) Maps
Exhaust Valve Opening Maps

Adjust RPM Limiter
Adjust Fan Temperature
Disable Stock O2 Sensor
Disable Deceleration Fuel Cut
Disable Exhaust Valve
Disable PAIR Valve / AIS
 

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I got my new-to-me 2009 K1300GT a couple of months ago and love almost everything about it. It was an upgrade from a Yamaha FZ6 and the size and power are very impressive and I'm loving it. Then the stalling issue started happening. Like others I've read about, I thought maybe it was operator error when downshifting coming to a stop, but realized that wasn't the case. Searched (and still searching) the forums and recalls and wherever else looking for THE answer to this problem. Took my bike back to place of purchase for them to check into the problem and again, like others I've read about, the service techs couldn't replicate the problem. They checked valve clearances, checked air filter, and changed the plugs and told me there was nothing else they could do for me at the time. All no charge, I might add. The next day when taking the bike out to winter storage, it stalled halfway there at a traffic light. DOES ANYONE HAVE AN ANSWER FOR ME??? I love the bike and don't want to work around a problem if a remedy exists. I have all winter to do more research and welcome any and all suggestions from other K-Bike owners. Cheers
Daniel , just finished resolving this frustrating issue with my 2009 K1300 R after 2 months of fighting with BMW . I moved from Calgary and working in Houston last 3 years , all of a sudden around 40K I starting stalling out in first gear I went through all the usual fixes that are recommended from the various forums such using certain "fuel brands" cleaning "throttle box" or its an "Air box issue" etc , trust me its a waste of your time and $$ there is only one fix and that's a software update " BMW is well aware of this situation both USA / CDN BMW Corporate will play stupid so will the dealerships they'll claim they've never heard of this issue with there bikes , however due to thousands of complaints world wide and a US department of transportation order to repair this unsafe condition BMW fixed it with a software update " . The issue you will find in the USA haven't checked Canada 3 of BMW dealerships in Houston were a complete waste of time as BMW refused to help and furthermore all the dealerships informed that they will not service any BMW if its over 10 years of age furthermore they'll will claim that they no longer have the equipment to read / write to the ECU or access to BMW software updates as BMW has removed the software , one service manager told me to sell the bike as parts !! I found a local European mechanic in Houston who had all the software updates who read my ECU only to discover that Calgary Blackfoot had never updated since 2009 when it rolled off the production floor a total of of 9 updates missed . Since the ECU was updated I've since put 5K on the bike and have had zero issues the bike has never run better .
 

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Discussion Starter · #78 ·
Daniel , just finished resolving this frustrating issue with my 2009 K1300 R after 2 months of fighting with BMW . I moved from Calgary and working in Houston last 3 years , all of a sudden around 40K I starting stalling out in first gear I went through all the usual fixes that are recommended from the various forums such using certain "fuel brands" cleaning "throttle box" or its an "Air box issue" etc , trust me its a waste of your time and $$ there is only one fix and that's a software update " BMW is well aware of this situation both USA / CDN BMW Corporate will play stupid so will the dealerships they'll claim they've never heard of this issue with there bikes , however due to thousands of complaints world wide and a US department of transportation order to repair this unsafe condition BMW fixed it with a software update " . The issue you will find in the USA haven't checked Canada 3 of BMW dealerships in Houston were a complete waste of time as BMW refused to help and furthermore all the dealerships informed that they will not service any BMW if its over 10 years of age furthermore they'll will claim that they no longer have the equipment to read / write to the ECU or access to BMW software updates as BMW has removed the software , one service manager told me to sell the bike as parts !! I found a local European mechanic in Houston who had all the software updates who read my ECU only to discover that Calgary Blackfoot had never updated since 2009 when it rolled off the production floor a total of of 9 updates missed . Since the ECU was updated I've since put 5K on the bike and have had zero issues the bike has never run better .
Wow...that would be fantastic if you're correct. Like I mentioned in an earlier response to a suggestion here, my tech gave me a yahhh, yahhh we checked the s/w kinda answer, so I'll be very interested in taking this back up with them come spring time. Cheers Ridgeback (y)
 

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Discussion Starter · #79 ·
Wow...that would be fantastic if you're correct. Like I mentioned in an earlier response to a suggestion here, my tech gave me a yahhh, yahhh we checked the s/w kinda answer, so I'll be very interested in taking this back up with them come spring time. Cheers Ridgeback (y)
Sorry, I should have said "that would be fantastic if THAT'S THE CASE", I'm sure you're correct! ;)
 

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Wow...that would be fantastic if you're correct. Like I mentioned in an earlier response to a suggestion here, my tech gave me a yahhh, yahhh we checked the s/w kinda answer, so I'll be very interested in taking this back up with them come spring time. Cheers Ridgeback (y)
Just ensure the mechanic has the ability to Read & Program the ECU plus has access to the required software updates, once he`s read the ECU request a print out of original software and the
updated ECU . The Houston mechanic invited me into the shop to watch the process.
 
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