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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey All,

This is my first post here so I figured I'd do a quick introduction. I've been playing with motorcycles for about 30 years now. Got into BMW's by the way of a salvaged r100gs that I was able to bring back to life. Found her in a barn about 6 years ago and spent some time with my son rebuilding it. What a memorable experience. Since then she has been my go to dual sport bike and I really, really, enjoy it. So much so that I bought an r1200gs in 2018. Tons of fun with that bike as well. As this summer dragged on I got bored and started looking online at K bikes. I've always enjoyed touring on a big four cylinder so I figured why not see what the motherland has to offer.

As it may come as a shock to all of you I found what I was looking for. A well cared for 3 owner k1200rs with brand new Penske front and rear! She had almost 80k on the odometer and from the few phone calls and internet pics I saw it looked like a good runner. So against other peoples better judgment (made complete sense to me) I bought a one way ticket from Pensacola to Pittsburgh. Met a hell of a nice guy and by 2pm the day I was off. Spent the next 4 days and 1200 miles enjoying the Blue Ridge Parkway. The bike ran perfectly and was such a joy. Only thing that I could notice was the front brakes felt vague and there was a slight shimmy in the front end.

Figured I would toss some new pads and do a brake fluid refresh once I got home. Just started the job last night. For some reason I just couldn't get the left caliper to bleed at all. Right one was great. But that left one.... Then I looked up and noticed my brake line looks like a python with a fresh kill. 馃榾. I think I found the problem. About 20 minutes later the brake line burst and my credit card is still smoldering from ordering the new stainless line kit for Speigler.

Anyhoo. Really enjoying the bike!

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Good for you my man. You have a great bike and found that multi year old rubber brake lines are trash. 8 year max is okay. Another failure mode is the inner lining acts as a check line and locks up the brake. Yikes. Enjoy the bike. Economical super fun. I used to own them, went through 3 of the beasts.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I got the old lady undressed and cleaned up in preparation for some new fancy stainless lines. I plan on changing the fuel filter while it's apart. Any suggestions on other maintenance items I should do while I wait?
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She's in good company in my carport/shop. Good thing I don't have an HOA.


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Take a quick peek from the front with a good flashlight at the rubber breather manifold behind the throttle bodies. Look for oil weeping or pooling in top of crank case. Lube the rear brake pedal pivot. Fuel filter and air filter maybe since you are 90% there. Any of the other normal maintenance things that would require taking all the Tupperware off.....
 

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Very nice RS. I'd recommend ensuring that there is some rubber grease behind the little gaiter on the rear brake master cylinder. In our wet climate (UK), water gets under the plastic internal sleeve and causes the internal face of the alloy case to fur up and expand - this can start to crush the plastic sleeve and trap the piston - or stop the piston returning home after braking. The first clue you'll get is the bike returning 12 miles per gallon, a burning smell, and small boys pointing at the crazy man on the motorbike with the back brake glowing bright orange . . . .
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Very nice RS. I'd recommend ensuring that there is some rubber grease behind the little gaiter on the rear brake master cylinder. In our wet climate (UK), water gets under the plastic internal sleeve and causes the internal face of the alloy case to fur up and expand - this can start to crush the plastic sleeve and trap the piston - or stop the piston returning home after braking. The first clue you'll get is the bike returning 12 miles per gallon, a burning smell, and small boys pointing at the crazy man on the motorbike with the back brake glowing bright orange . . . .
Thanks mcchoc. Definitely do not want to be that guy.
 

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When you do the brakes, do not forget to bleed the ABS module. You cannot just bleed these brakes like you did on older bikes. Same for your R1200GS. If you don't know how, then read up. There's several Youtube videos on how to do it, depending on which generation ABS you have. If you have Servo-assisted integral ABS, this is especially important.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
When you do the brakes, do not forget to bleed the ABS module. You cannot just bleed these brakes like you did on older bikes. Same for your R1200GS. If you don't know how, then read up. There's several Youtube videos on how to do it, depending on which generation ABS you have. If you have Servo-assisted integral ABS, this is especially important.
Thanks Felix. I do have a servo system on this bike. I'v been methodically reading the manual as well as other bleeding guidance I found on this site over the last week. I feel like the biggest challenge of all this so far is identifying the different bleed screws. I got nothing to lose and know my way around bikes so I'm going to give it a go!
 

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Thanks Felix. I do have a servo system on this bike. I'v been methodically reading the manual as well as other bleeding guidance I found on this site over the last week. I feel like the biggest challenge of all this so far is identifying the different bleed screws. I got nothing to lose and know my way around bikes so I'm going to give it a go!
thats it man, give it a crack!!! Its the best way to work on bikes for anyone with half a modicum of mechanical knowledge and a desire to learn and just work things out.... I love it man, best of luck with it all.
 

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Thanks Felix. I do have a servo system on this bike. I'v been methodically reading the manual as well as other bleeding guidance I found on this site over the last week. I feel like the biggest challenge of all this so far is identifying the different bleed screws. I got nothing to lose and know my way around bikes so I'm going to give it a go!
sperz,
Here you go! The various bleed screws and the sequence is outlined in this procedure, as well as the special tools you'll need. Basically you do the front and rear wheel circuits first, and then the control circuits. After you do this once, I think you'll find that it's easier than it looks.
 

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sperz,
Here you go! The various bleed screws and the sequence is outlined in this procedure, as well as the special tools you'll need. Basically you do the front and rear wheel circuits first, and then the control circuits. After you do this once, I think you'll find that it's easier than it looks.

John,
This is a good detailed procedure that has been around the web for quite a while. HOWEVER as it was created for R1150 boxer owners , when used for a K1200RS-GT those unfamiliar with these ABS-servos system MUST BE AWARE of a few IMPORTANT DIFFERENCES:
1) On K1200RS of 2001-2005 and K1200GT of 2003-2005, the modulator is installed vertically in frame, thus BMW could NOT use the 2 small reservoir embedded on top of the ABS unit (as you see in this written tutorial for R1150 models)

2) when the document refer to bleeding the REAR wheel-circuit , you need to use the most OUTWARD section of the reservoir located on right side (see photo below)

3) when the document refer to bleeding the FRONT Wheel-circuit , you need to use the most INWARD section of the reservoir located on right side (see photo below)

4) When bleeding the so-called "control circuits", refer to last photo below for location of each bleeder on the K1200RS-GT unit. One of these is hidden on the battery side.

5) You do NOT absolutely need to unplug the large ABS unit connector to reach all bleeders when doing the control-circuits , however it makes the job a bit easier. If you do in fact choose to disconnect it, be aware that it is safer to disconnect and isolate the negative battery wires (2 large) while the unit is disconnected. Even with ignition OFF, there is a live connection to the ABS unit. Of course you will need to reset / adjust the dash time clock if you disconnect the battery.


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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Wow! Thanks for all the resources gents. Those are great visual cues @sailor. I've searched for the "special" BMW tool for the inboard bleeder and it was a no go. I think I'm going tap on my ******* tendencies to make that one happen.

I've found this document as well that seams to outline the procedure pretty well.
 

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Sailor, thanks for the additional comments. I used that procedure on my old R1150RS. My old '00 K1200RS pre-dated Integral ABS, so I wasn't aware that the later K1200RS modulator was different from that of the R1150RS. No wonder the cost of these modulators is so high; BMW couldn't use one design for all models.
 

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Wow! Thanks for all the resources gents. Those are great visual cues @sailor. I've searched for the "special" BMW tool for the inboard bleeder and it was a no go. I think I'm going tap on my tendencies to make that one happen.

I've found this document as well that seams to outline the procedure pretty well.
This bleed / fluid replacement procedure you have posted (written by GARY) is the proper one for K1200RS 2001-2005 and K1200GT 2003-2005. This one is not as detailed as the earlier one for R1150 boxers BUT it does avoid all confusions / differences I was trying to explain in my earlier post.

If you are a visual type of guy like me, you might also appreciate the following 3 videos on YouTube done by a member of another K1200RS forum. He is a bit too much back-and-forth making the videos a bit longer, but overall he did a very good job of documenting the Wheel-circuits (video part-1), the Control-circuits (video part-2) and the clutch slave bleeding (part-3):

IMPORTANT: please be aware that we are dealing with a critical system here - there is a risk of messing this up and getting yourself in some trouble. So if you start on this path you will have to take full responsibilities for any loss of braking power while riding. Just to please the lawyers...




 
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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Just watched those videos @sailor. Good stuff! I just ordered the fancy funnel attachment for fluid reservoir. I was hoping to tackle this tomorrow but I feel like I should put it off until this comes in. Looks like it helps tremendously. Thanks again.
 
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