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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
2010 K1300GT, about 32,000 miles. Tire pressure readout for the front went intermittent, now flashes red all the time. Never saw it go orange and apparently the sensor battery is dead. Give age and mileage I will replace both front and back. Bought cheap units from Amazon. Back tire needs replacement, took it off tonight, removed tire from rim, what a job with only hand tools. I've watched some videos, searched forum posts, know that the new sensor must be keyed to the ZFE unit, but I'm unclear about the details of doing it.

The outside face of the (assumed original) TPMS unit says "Schrader Electronics", and "BMW Part No 7694420" and the side of the unit has a sticker with barcode and "50234550002929" which again doesn't look like a BMW part number. The new rear sensor unit has a sticker on the side says "2260749". Are any of these numbers significant for the reinstallation?

I have access to a GS-911 and understand it can be used to key the new sensor to the ZFE unit, has someone got a process description or video? Do I have to remount the tire, put it on the bike, pump it up, use the tool, for it to be recognized by the ZFE? Or can I wake up the sensor prior to reassembly? I want to know the new sensor battery is good so I don't have to go through tire dismount/remount/reassembly again

I also see a Youtube video using an inexpensive "wake-up tool" number EL50448, that wakes up the sensor prior to installation, and thus establishes whether the sensor battery is good. Better than the GS-911, or just another way? Process looks dead simple, just press a button, green light flashes, unit wakes up and transmits to ZFE, instrument cluster reads zero.

I'm looking for reassurance that GS-911 sensor wake-up can be done while the sensor is off the bike, or I should get the EL50448 too, which will set back the process a couple weeks. Don't know anyone locally (Honolulu, Hawaii) that might have such a tool. Beemers are scarce in these parts.

The China sensor is cheap enough that I will tinker with battery replacement later at no great risk for loss. Plenty of how-to videos out there, and by that time I'll know which wake-up tool is the golden ticket.

Thanks all, Happy New Year.
 

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ZFE (not ZKE) they spell as badly as American's, z = central, f = chassis, e = electronics unit or such

you can fit the sensors ride around forever and do nothing (but get irritated by the lights on the dash) and code when you can - but its easier to code them OFF the bike before fitting (as you need less tools)

if you don't have any info on the parts or a sensor wake up tool - e.g no idea of the 6 or 7 digit long Bluetooth code you write to the ZFE ( I think it usually starts with a 6 ) certainly if using the motoscan phone app - you can do it without knowing them or having the correct wake up tool (never actually tried the GS911 although I do own a red wifi one)

without knowing the code to write, the sensors need to be awake transmitting what they are so the tool can pick up the code and you know what to write to the ZFE

the issue I find comes if both are awake, it tends to get upset as you try and enter things... the correct way is to have a TPMS sensor wake up tool - you can get then for $15 on ebay - but I find them troublesome - it has a bit you point near the sensor and a 9v battery in the tool blast a signal at the sensor to say wake up - then off you go. The beauty here is you can wake one up code one, move on to the next.

So if you have no tool and ride the bike to wake them you struggle to know which sensor is which, and the bike tend to complain as you try to write the code. They wake by going above 35mph and doing 1 mile or so, but it can be 250 yards or up to 3 miles when the battery is low

What I do is get another bike, tape the sensor to the inside of the back wheel rim with masking tape (externally), run the bike up to 40mph for a few mins then take back to the bike you wish to code and you get 15 minutes to place the sensor within 2 foot of the headlight or near the rear mudguard / swinging arm pivot, and look for the BT code to type in (if you use another bike with TPMS to spin up yours - make sure its at least 5 metres away when playing on yours - or you have 3 transmitting)

the idea is simple but if the sensor is asleep you get nowhere (but of course you may not know its still asleep - or you took to long and its gone back to sleep) - if both awake it argues, one by one off the bike (with another bike that you can use on it centre stand to spin it up) - its really easy

Battery support for the bike is essential -- BMW's code best with high voltage - and you might take an hour faffing about trying

FYI last fake Chinese sensor I got, you can wake by shaking in you hand - its the shock that triggers it - or I can kick the front tyre to wake one of them - No BMW sensor will ever respond in this way
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks Botus, you're right, Zentrale Fahrzeugelektronik (ZFE) translates to Central Chassis Electronics, but I claim bonus points for correct use of apostrophes and capitalization. I've edited my original post.

See youtube video at
which shows two ways to code a new sensors to the ZFE using a GS-911. Per the video, the EL50448 wake-up tool range is less than a foot, so it shouldn't activate other TPM sensors in the vicinity (YMMV). The receiver on the bike has greater range, as it must, to "listen" to sensors on both wheels.

Procedure 1, with wake-up sensor: connect GS-911, set XRDC function in "learn tire sensor" mode, trigger the sensor with the wake-up tool (sensor need not be mounted) which causes the sensor to broadcast its ID number which is recorded by the GS-911 software (and by ZFE on the bike). Write the sensor number on the inside of the rim and on the sensor itself in case you need to know it later. Sensor numbers in this video can be 6 or are 7 digits and may start with "3" although the replacement I have starts with "2".

Procedure 2, without EL50448 wake-up tool: a connected GS-911 allows manual input of a known sensor number.

Soooo... my intent is to determine, without fully reassembling the tire on rim on bike, whether the new sensors have good batteries. First, I can try shaking the sensor and see if it activates, using automatic learning of Procedure 1. If that fails I'll use Procedure 2. In either case, the instrument cluster should read out zero pressure since the tires won't be mounted. If no cluster response (or dashes as the current situation) then either I haven't coded the correct sensor number, the battery is dead, or I need the EL50448 to activate the sensor.

Hope this works, and hope it helps someone else down the line. I'll revisit this response whether I get it done or not... pray for me.
 

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we can get more TLA's going

RDC = TPMS ....Reifendruckkontrollsysteme so RDK is what it should be, seems they anglicise their own german acronym...

interesting what u have there suggests the GS911 does the typing - last few times I used the motoscan tool for this feature (more than 4 years back), the red bit below got the code and you typed it to the bike's ZFE....


  • Establish the connection to the RDC control unit in the MotoScan app (ignition must be switched on)
  • Go to “Service Functions” in the control unit and select “Teach RDK Sensor”.
  • Depending on the motorcycle model, either 1 or 2 wheelsets are supported. The older models, such as K25, K72, support 2 sets, so that you can teach the two and simply change them if necessary without having to teach them again each time. With newer ones, from K50, K48 etc., there is only one set and teaching is required for each change.
  • Press the "Front" or "Back" buttons in the app to start the teach-in
  • Place the activation tool on the tire where the sensor is located and press the button on the tool to activate the sensor.
  • As soon as the sensor is activated and recognized by the RDC control unit, the control unit will read out the sensor ID from the sensor and save it. This is displayed in the app.
  • Repeat the same with the second sensor.
 

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you can dig out the gunge (with a dremel type device) and replace your batteries, and use hot melt glue to refit.... nintendo batteries have soldered tags that make it easier / safer to solder to your original sensors wiring - of course then you don't need any diagnostic or wake up tools


and u save the planet
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I'll dig out and replace both old batteries once both are out.

Have to say, the GS-911 actually makes this job easy-peasy. There are two ways to pair new sensors, you can do it with the wake-up tool or just key in the new sensor number. Supposedly it can also check battery condition, I didn't do that (yet). You can pair two pairs of sensors to the ZFE, so while one functional pair are out you can replace the batteries in the other pair, just remember to use the GS-911 to tell the ZFE which are installed and should be "listened" to.
 

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You can pair two pairs of sensors to the ZFE
Yes, this is a standard Iron Butt Rally trick when keeping spare wheels with tires already mounted at the checkpoints.

just remember to use the GS-911 to tell the ZFE which are installed and should be "listened" to.
That's not always necessary. After you swap wheels and ride for a little bit, the ZFE "hears" the new sensors and switches to those without any intervention.
 
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