BMW K1200, K1300, and K1600 Forum banner

1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
504 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Rode home today in heavy winds...gusts up to 90 km/hr. First time I've ever felt the wind on the mighty K but then I've never ridden in wind that strong. I was glad to have a relatively heavy bike. I doubt the new F800ST would've faired as well.

Do you think the effects of the wind are worse at higher speeds? I was only riding between 50 and 70 km/hr.

I wonder if anyone has ever been blown over while riding a motorcycle?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
407 Posts
sincGT said:
I wonder if anyone has ever been blown over while riding a motorcycle?
Closest I ever came was when on a somewhat similar Honda CBR1100XX riding a two lane highway as a thunderstorm was approaching. Ahead of me a pick-up truck I was following veered into the other/oncoming lane. I thought the driver was distracted. When I hit the spot where he veered the same thing happened to me. I was slammed into the oncoming lane. A pipeline of wind blast there. Nothing I could do.

High altitude Colorado is a windy place. Stay loose but hold the bars firmly so they don't get yanked out of the hands, concentrate, tuck a bit, enjoy the ride :).
 

·
Addict
Joined
·
3,750 Posts
..............Do you think the effects of the wind are worse at higher speeds?

A slight steer change at 100mph puts you on the opposite lane far quicker than the same steer change at 40mph. Any top and side luggage makes it worse. But the heavy K probably fares better than most lighter bikes.

I had something similar happen to me. I stay more alert on roads with flat unobstructed plains either side of the lanes, which is when I've noticed unpredictable side wind most.



Never pay again for live sex! | Hot girls doing naughty stuff for free! | Chat for free!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
118 Posts
I was riding the other day with a friend (who also has a k12rs), he had his son on the back, as we cleared a line of trees, heavy winds hit, he was blown into the next lane. It really shocked me, I was ready for it and ended up leaning over a fair amount, the wind was only 60 mph or so, but pretty effective.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
651 Posts
sincGT said:
I wonder if anyone has ever been blown over while riding a motorcycle?
Saw something on some site a few years back about some guy on a motorbike on I-15 in southern CA near Devore being sent across three or more lanes of traffic by a really strong gust during a Santa Ana wind episode, and those winds can be pretty nasty. Sounds like it would be a sphincter-tightening experience... :p
 

·
"Hey Y'all"
Joined
·
2,239 Posts
Physics 101 ....

sincGT said:
Rode home today in heavy winds...gusts up to 90 km/hr...........
Do you think the effects of the wind are worse at higher speeds? I was only riding between 50 and 70 km/hr.
The effects of wind DIMISH at higher speeds. Force= Mass x Velocity2, so you (your bike) has more force as it's (your) velocity increases. It takes more wind to shove you around the faster you go, so rail it. ;)

I wonder if anyone has ever been blown over while riding a motorcycle?
I'm sure someone blew it. :wtf We were blown into the oncomming lane in Jackson Hole by a thunderstorm one year. Could I have stayed in our lane? Dunno; it was easier to reduce the fight to ALL of the road, since no traffic was approaching. This same storm blew an Aspen down in Moose Junction. The branches brushed Susan's back as it fell! Nasty little storm, that was.

One year my brother and I got hit by an 80mph gust (NOAA radio data) from a thunderstorm blowing in over Tampa Bay. He almost lost it. I was 100 feet back and lower on the bridge. Still, that's too much wind. Your 55mph winds were no cake walk.

Once heading home from Daytona I passed a semi on I-95. I passed on the right, shoved the bar left when I got in front, and went straight. :ricky A gust of wind caught me just as I was trying to turn. It was weird, but memorable.

So two things for wind:
1. Speed up.
2. Don't fight it any more than you have to.
3. (so I can't count) Windscreen UP. It's better to have the bike take the buffetting rather than wear yourself out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
166 Posts
Upon returning from a particularly windy ride, my wife asked me if the bike would blow over in the wind or if the tires would be pushed out from under it. :lol: She could tell I was leaning pretty hard into the wind. I told here the wind would just blow the bike off the road. It didn't seem to comfort her. :D

You need to countersteer, pushing on the upwind grip. I had to push a lot harder on my K75RT to get the same lean so I think that the front fender on the K12RS helps with that. The wind pushes on it and turns the front away from the wind which causes you to lean into the wind.

A steady wind is less a problem than changes in the wind. The sudden changes can put you into the next lane if you aren't watching for them. Any change in topography or things that block wind can do that. If you anticipate them, you can handle them.

The one that surprised me the most was a bridge with jersey barriers on either side. The wind hit the barrier and went up and then rolled back in the other direction. It was a pretty windy day and as I hit the bridge approach, the wind suddenly shifted to the other side.

-hank
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
373 Posts
I was on my way to Road America late one night, and North of Milwaukee. There was a thunderstorm in the distance, but approaching rapidly. I decided to try and make it to Elkhart Lake, instead of looking for shelter.

While on the inside lane of a 3wide highway, the wind blew me across the other 2 lanes and onto the shoulder of the road. Luckily a semi was far enough behind me to miss me. I could barely hold the bike up after stopping. Then, the rain and hail hit!

There was an overpass about a 1/2 mile down the road. Trying to get there, the bike would suddenly tilt 45 degrees over and serve. But, I made it and parked next a concrete pillar to brace myself.

The next, morning I found out that a tornado had touched down about 4 miles from me and wiped out a town! I have absolutely hated riding in windy conditions since then. Cold and rain is not a problem, but I get so tensed up in the wind I get knots in my neck.

But, today is 44 degrees in Chicago and I need to ride the 92 miles to the dealer! :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
180 Posts
I Headed from Colorado to Carlsbad, New Mexico a few years ago. My buddy ran out of gas near Las Vegas. NM on his Guzzi Quota. I went to get gas for him and when I got back the wind had blown his Guzzi off the centerstand.
Later that day, farther south, the overhead at a gas station was blowing around creaking the metal beams that held it up. Luckily, it didn't fall on us. While fueling, I dropped my glove, which disappeared into the wind in seconds.That sucked.
Later that day, as we pressed on, We came up on a fire truck, lights flashing and siren on. You could see smoke several miles ahead of us.He had a string of cars following him. I guess, in southern New Mexico, the fire equipment is left over from somewhere as this truck was about a 1949 year model at newest. Seemed like it was bucking the wind at about 20mph. Needless to say, I felt a little uneasy when I passed all the cars and then the fire truck.
Later that evening, the news reported that they had recorded record winds in the area. The good news was that the wind was coming from my right all day. Since I was leaning right the whole time I figured it would counteract the wear from the road on the left side of my tires!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
178 Posts
Cabnfvr,
Your formula seems to bear out my experience. Two years ago returning from Palomar down CA 74 into the low desert a gust took me over to the next lane. Very unsettling in this case because the next lane faced oncomming traffic. There was no oncomming traffic, fortunately.
Vlad
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
686 Posts
This guy was; fortunately he wasn't hurt badly. Nothing to do with wind though.
He was on the i-bmw site dunno if he's here now.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
The first time that I rode one a new (at the time) R1100 RS, I was cruising at about 125 and tucked in behind the small windshield. When I had had enough, I sat up and the sudden increase in wind pressure nearly cleaned me off of the bike. I barely held onto the bars and managed to readjusted my position. The thought of coming off of the back of the bike at that speed was, and still is truly frightening.
 

·
Looking for better limits...
Joined
·
5,163 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Hi guys,

I just want to re-inforce the advice given by CABNFVR to you all. I ride across a mountain pass every day down here in New Zealand and the wind is often extreme. The rode is closed on occasion because of the wind. It is not unusual for the wind to be blowing from all directions seemingly at once. It can be pushing on your back so hard when you are braking for a corner, that it feels like a big hand pushing you faster than you want to go. I have had (quite literally) a car flipped on its roof right in front of me!
OK - all I am saying is if I know anything I know how to ride in the wind.

Now CABNFVR is totally correct about keeping your speed up. Go as fast as you feel comfortable, then add a bit. The whole plot will feel so much better if you get a bit brave...trust me on this one. I have passed so many guys struggling and obviously really unhappy just because they are going slow.

You also need to stay relaxed but concentrating on what you are doing. You can usually "see" the wind. Watch the hedges and trees off to the side of the road and other road users. If it is raining you can always spot the wind gusts and allow for them.

I disagree about having the screen up. To me you need to present as small a target for the wind as possible.

In my experience the K series bikes (I have had 4) are really good in the wind, but you still need to do everything you can to stay up right.

cheers

Tony
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
227 Posts
CABNFVR said:
The effects of wind DIMISH at higher speeds. Force= Mass x Velocity2, so you (your bike) has more force as it's (your) velocity increases. It takes more wind to shove you around the faster you go, so rail it. ;) QUOTE]

I think stability comes from the gyroscopic effect of the wheels' rotation, the faster the rotation the more the wheels want to stay upright. Like a rider "riding" a bike on a dynomometer, the faster he goes (standing still), the more upright stability he has. I don't remember the equation so I don't know if the effect increases linearly, exponentially, or what, relative to wheel rotation speed.

The velocity vector from left to right is zero no matter the straight ahead speed. The bike has no speed nor momentum in the direction of a cross wind.

Ron
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
504 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Well, sounds like I should have been riding a bit faster. At the time I was concerned that at a higher speed, I would have been pushed into the oncoming lane quicker (if that was likely to happen) since I would be covering ground at a faster rate.

I had the wind screen down, was slightly tucked, and tried to keep a relaxed grip on the bars. Although it felt like I was being pushed over 3 feet at times, it was probably only a foot or so. Can't say it was an enjoyable experience...the oncoming darkness and rain didn't help!

A few years ago I encountered some severe gusts while riding over a bridge North of Portland, Oregon (on my 93 VFR). I was really questioning my sanity for being on that bridge on a bike at that time, especially since there were no other bikes to be seen.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
What about Newton's "other" law of FRICTION which actually keeps the bike upright ... as I understand, greater the speed - lesser the friction ... hence, more chances of the wind to knock/push the upright bike when the wind hits from the sides!
 

·
Addict
Joined
·
3,750 Posts
This got me thinking a bit as well. Now you can work out some vectors for a few wind speeds at right angles to the bike travelling a straight line for different speeds and find the resultant angle (if not corrected by steer) gets smaller as the bike goes faster off at a tangent so to speak. But I keep thinking of those cages and trucks that get blown over.

The energy power in wind is a cubic law function of wind speed, vehicles have side area and height, and motorcycles need to stay upright. So veering off course upright is only one problem, tipping over is another.

Somebody could do the maths on both right and left hand sweepers with a strong sidewind. I think I know which way I'd rather be riding! Some sidewind can be smooth and more predictable whilst others seem turbulent and catch you out if you haven't spotted the signs. I understand the comment about high screens. With a frontal projection intended to be aerodynamic, it's fine until the aerodynamics are upset by turbulance and other wind forces when they may cause instability.

I think the topic is whether riding faster through unpredictable crosswinds is safer or not and I'm not yet convinced, but I do know totalling a bike at high speeds cuts my odds.



Never pay again for live sex! | Hot girls doing naughty stuff for free! | Chat for free!
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top