BMW K1200, K1300, and K1600 Forum banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
357 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I usually don't see many 12/13 GTs out and about but today I saw 2 on the way to work, both within 15 minutes of each other in Chesapeake VA... The first was silver (no side cases) and heading up Battlefield and made a left onto Benefit Rd. with his friend (about 12:20PM). The next was dark blue, with cases, on North Landing Rd. (Ches. into Va. Beach) at around 12:35ish.

Anyone here???
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Love the blue color.

Side question, how hard is it to pull the bodywork off your K? I have an 06 'r but have a line on a cheap GT that had a low speed lowside and needs to have one side replaced (dealer gave it a clean bill other than a lever and body).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
357 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Affectionately known as Tupperware...

It's pretty straight forward. All you need is your T25 screwdriver and a T25 bit in a small (1/4" works fine) ratchet.

The screw driver can reach the 2 on the small panel under the bars (battery cover). Once loose, lift the backend and slide it rearward. Main panels : 3 along the bottom sides, 1(longer) midway up (near your knees), 3 along the top (on the right side they are visible when you open the glove box), top corners of the fairings just under the headlight. The right side has a hidden one behind the soft rubber gasket. From there, use the ratchet and move the wheel for clearance. The rest run down the inside of the black plastic and screw into wellnuts that are affixed into the panels (these are a little bit longer). Wiggle the panels free but be careful as there are pegs that slide into greased rubber grommets (these need to be pulled or pushed straight in. Each panel has alignment tabs that slide into or under the adjoining panels. Make sure they are lined up. It's pretty easy if you have things lined up. Also, get a piece of foam or something you can stick the screws into as you remove them, in some orientation that makes it easy to put the correct screw in the correct hole.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,397 Posts
DWolvin said:
Love the blue color.

Side question, how hard is it to pull the bodywork off your K? I have an 06 'r but have a line on a cheap GT that had a low speed lowside and needs to have one side replaced (dealer gave it a clean bill other than a lever and body).
It is not that hard, but take your time. Here are a few lessons that I have learned over the years:

Use Photos and Box Lids
The panel screws are different lengths, and it is easy to get them confused. Take a photo of each panel (or get them from the Internet). Tape the photo to the top of a cardboard box lid (like the kind that reams of paper come in). As you remove each screw, punch it through the place in the photo where you removed it. It will keep you from losing screws, and help you remember where to put them back later. Keep the box lids. You will use them over and over. Mine are seven years old, and I still use them.

Rubber Bushings Behind Panels
Behind certain places on the panels are rubber bushings with brass threaded inserts. They look like small tophats. The rubber "hat" expands in its anchor hole as you tighten the screw on the panel side. The screw holds the panel against the "brim" of the bushing. When you try to remove the screws later, the rubber "hat" part sometimes separates behind the anchor hole. The broken-off "hat" spins in place, making it hard to remove the screw from its brass insert. If that happens, be patient, pull the panel away from the bike just a bit to allow the "hat" to press against the inner side of its anchor hole as you remove the screw. I like to keep extra bushings around as spares. I never seem to have one when I need it, because they cost several dollars each.

Do Not Over-Tighten Screws When Replacing Panels
If you over-tighten a screw, you can crack the panel in a neat little circle around the screw head. This is especially true for the screws that go into the bushings that I described in the previous paragraph. The panel screw should be snug enough not to come off. It is easy to over-tighten Torx screws.

Pointed Fittings and Rubber Grommets
The side panels have long pointed fittings that are held tightly by rubber grommets. It isn't that hard to pull the panels out from the grommets after all the screws have been removed. It is easy to forget a screw (including the one in the top front behind the rubber flap, or the two under the glovebox cover), so make sure you have found them all. When you are ready to pull the panel away from the rubber grommet, it may require a gentle steady force. Be careful to pull the panel straight out.

Foam Heat Protector
There is a black foam heat protector on the right side. It simply pulls off. Remember to push it back on before you attach the right side panel. If the soft foam strip starts to peel back, I used some gasket sealer to glue it back on, figuring that the gasket sealer could handle the heat. It has not come unglued since then.

Alignment Tabs and Slots
The side panels have tabs that fit into matching slots on the bike or the lower panels. The tabs ensure proper alignment and help hold the panels in place. Be careful not to break them. Pay attention to them as you reattach the panels or something will be off. Inevitably I forget to align one of the tabs. It is obvious that something isn't right, and then I have to loosen or remove a few screws to get the panel to fit correctly.

Temperature Sensor
Watch out for the pointy temperature sensor in the front. It is clipped in place, and you can easily forget to take it off or disconnect the wire when removing that inner panel, breaking off the inner clip that is part of the panel. Carefully disconnect the temperature sensor or its wire if you plan to remove that panel.

This is probably TMI, but I hope it helps.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Good to know- I have to admit I picked the K12r partly because of the lack of bodywork. That said, I've always liked the look of the GT...
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top