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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a K1200R without ABS but somehow was under the impression that some of my front-lever braking force was being distributed to the rear wheel. I have been confused in trying to figure out what EVO, non-integral ABS, partial-integral ABS, integral ABS, etc, mean. After this cropped up in another thread, I tried a 4th time to clarify for myself and certainly didn't acheive more understanding. Following are cut-and-pastes from a few sources, in blue font.

This from the BMW website, on the brakes of the standard K1200R:
Brake system: BMW EVO partial-integral ABS
Front brakes: 12.6 inches double-disc EVO brake system with floating brake discs and four-piston fixed caliper
Rear brakes: 10.3 inches single disc brake with fixed double-piston caliper
ABS (Optional): BMW Motorrad Integral ABS (partially integral version)

I don't understand why "brake system" looks so much like the optional ABS description.

Elsewhere they list the following as optional, and is identical to what they say is standard above:
BMW EVO partial Integral ABS

On "Web Bike World's" K1200R review, here is the paragraph on brakes, and I don't know why they are saying "K1200S" in an "R" review, but this is the seminal source of my confusion:
BMW's acclaimed EVO brake system is standard on the K 1200 S. Integral ABS is available as an option. Disc diameters in front are 320mm with a single 265mm disc at the rear. The K 1200 S includes BMW's Partial-Integral adaptive braking system. Both brakes -- front and rear -- are activated whenever the rider pulls the handlebar-mounted lever, but only the rear brake is activated by the foot pedal. BMW has continued to develop the EVO ABS system and for the K 1200 S, the technology has been refined once again to take full advantage of the bike's peerless sporting performance.

The following is from "motorcyclist:"
I was similarly impressed by the R-bike's brakes, which incorporate the optional ABS as well as BMW's familiar EVO servo-assisted system.
This seemed to substantiate that EVO is both something standard and something that augments a normal mechanical front brake.

Very similar, this is from a UK publication called "What Bike," reviewing the K1200R. Here, they seem to clearly state that there is a servo on the non-ABS bikes. If there is a servo, I could see it sending some signal to the rear that I could overlook when examining my bike:
Our bikes came with optional ABS as well as BMW's familiar servo-assisted system. The servo gives you loads of stopping power while the ABS gives you the confidence to use it to the full.

My rider's manual is worse. It seems to talk only of ABS, and uses the terms partial integral and integral confusingly:

p78 - The BMW integral ABS provides improved...braking force distribution by means of the integral braking function

p78 three paragraphs later - Partially integral brake. Your motorcycle is equipped with a partially integral brake configuration. Both front and rear brakes are applied simultaneously when you pull the handbrake lever.

p78 next paragraph - The electronic controller of the BMW Integral ABS regulates braking-force distribution between front and rear wheels.

It looks like they randomly call them integral or partially integral. I do not have ABS on my bike. I'd really like to know whether it's doing something more than front brakes when I use the hand lever. The stainless brake line from the handbrake leads to the front caliper, and I don't see how I would have any brake force distributed to the rear.

I love the bike, but I'm wondering how much of it's innovative engineering is really innovative vocabulary.
 

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Hmmm; well, I tried before, and I'm still correct. Even if every flipping reviewer in the country can't keep it straight, and BMW's current marketing weenies can't either- at least when they're translating from German. I bought two bikes with the original EVO+Integral servo ABS when it first came out (K1200RS and R1150RT) . "Integral" brakes came in two versions- partially integrated and fully integrated. Partially integrated means the handbrake activates both, the foot brake only the rear; fully integrated means both do both. BMW was at extreme pains to make this all clear then, even if some of them have gotten it confused now.

The line in your specs: "Front brakes: 12.6 inches double-disc EVO brake system with floating brake discs and four-piston fixed caliper" is absolutely correct; the EVO designation was introduced to designate the new disc/caliper system developed by Brembo/BMW, and marked "BMW" on the caliper instead of "Brembo" You have "EVO" brakes on most BMWs from 2002 on. The integrated+servo feature is only present if you add the optional ABS. The ONLY new bike with non integrated non servo ABS supposedly will be the new R1200S, and that's probably to save about 15 lbs.

So you do have the Evo brakes, you DON'T have ABS, Servo boost, or Integrated features if you didn't get the optional ABS. Put it on the center stand and see.
 

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HuecoDoc said:
I have a K1200R without ABS but somehow was under the impression that some of my front-lever braking force was being distributed to the rear wheel.
It's pretty easy to determine if this is true.

Put the bike up on the center stand (if it has one, otherwise improvise). Start the motor and put it in gear, or, just have someone spin the rear tire. Now, put on the front brake. If the rear wheel stops, ....there's your answer!

Bob.
 

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RFWILSON said:
It's pretty easy to determine if this is true.

Put the bike up on the center stand (if it has one, otherwise improvise). Start the motor and put it in gear, or, just have someone spin the rear tire. Now, put on the front brake. If the rear wheel stops, ....there's your answer!

Bob.
Ahhh...as usual KISS
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
kkugel said:
Hmmm; well, I tried before, and I'm still correct.
Thanks for your replies, both of them. I'm still correct in thinking this belongs in a new thread.

I HAVE concluded that my non-ABS bike has conventional brakes that work well, at least up front. Looking and reading unfortunately told me otherwise. Other than what I've heard here, 100% of sources were contradictory to this or at least muddled.

Note that on an ABS-equipped bike, putting it on a stand will defeat the "pull-away test" initialization of the ABS. Also, I think the ABS shuts down below a certain registered speed, and results may not be typical if the wheels are not in uniform rotation.

The same could be said about my bike IF the crap I've read were true. Until I know how an alleged EVO servo-assisted brake system receives brake force or signal, and how the servo applies itself front-to-rear, and until I manufacture something so that I can jack up the bike without crushing exhuast, "simply" and "stupidly" (as in someone's KISS comment) getting the wheels off of the ground could be expected to yield atypical results.

The bike kicks a$$. That can be dangerous. I think we should know clearly what we have available to reign in the horses if we have 160 of them trying to buck us off.

Again, thanks KKugel for the replies and don't think I don't believe you. After a month of confusion including buying every review I could find, I'm trying to spare someone else the same hassle.
 

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I wouldn't necessarily believe me either without some corroboration, which you have made an impressive effort to get- however unsuccessfully. Even though I'm an unimpeachable source. ;)

I cannot excuse all the confusion on this subject either; and it has only seemed to get worse in the last 4 years. But I have a couple of advantages- one is that I was following the technology when it was still being explained by the engineers from the groups that developed it, not by tech writers or marketing types. Since the engineers really understood it they were much clearer in their descriptions. But even then, because both the improved brakes and the integral servo ABS were introduced together, people were confused and referring to the whole system as "Evo".

I also have the benefit of actually seeing the Integrated ABS unit standing alone; an impressively massive and complex unit. It has to be so to do all the functions it does, it's really an amazingly sophisticated unit. Unlike people who are eagerly awaiting a new simpler ABS system, I wanted THIS one. But it's the integrated functions that make it so big, the unit is dynamically allocating front/rear braking force and ABS thresholds based on lots of factors- including periodic tests of traction. There is no WAY that you would be getting these features without the full unit, the ABS is incorporated in that unit, not a little add-on module. This is a real brake system, not some wanky little proportional valve.

Use both brakes on your bike; you'll be happier. The Evo brakes themselves were considered by BMW to be enough of an advance that they warranted their own name; and they are excellent conventional brakes.
 
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