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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Best way to secure the S for transport

I'm wondering what's the best way to secure the S for transport. Here's what I'm thinking so far:

1) Use two soft-ties around the front "wheel harness." The reason for this is that then I can use ratcheting tie-downs and crank down to secure the front end of the bike, but the suspension won't be compressed as it would be if I were to secure the tie-downs to a spot higher up on the bike.

2) As a backup, put Canyon Dancers (bar harness) on the bars and secure them to tie-down points that are different from those used for the wheel harness tie-downs. The difference is that I won't crank down hard on the bar tie-downs because they are there only for backup in case on of the main front tie-downs fails, and to prevent the upper part of the bike from bouncing since the suspension won't be compressed by the primary tie-downs. Also, I don't want to crank down on them because I've heard that when using bar-harnesses on bikes with heated grips that the heating elements can be damaged it too much force is used.

3) Use tie-downs (maybe with soft-ties) on the rear peg hangers to secure the rear of the bike. Don't crank down enough to compress the suspension noticeably.

4) Use tie-downs (maybe with soft-ties) somewhere on the sub-frame area as a backup to the main rear tie-downs. Again, since they are backups, don't crank down.

Does that sound like a good plan? Also, I was planning on letting a few pounds out of the tires (especially the front) in order to allow it to compress a bit more easily since the front tie-downs will squeeze the tire, not the suspension. I was going to set the ESA to the hardest pre-load and compression/rebound dampening settings (well, leave them that way since that's the way I always ride anyway).

Otherwise, that's about it.

Any comments?

Also, I'm having trouble finding a way to get my bike out to the West coast within the next 2 weeks. I posted all about it in the Ride Tales forum under the Community section, so if anyone has any suggestions that I haven't tried, I'd appreciate the advice.

As always, Thanks in advance!
 

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Seems like riding it would be more fun.
Are you relocating? If so, You could send everything else with your furniture and, if you have one, family.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
DSS said:
Seems like riding it would be more fun.
Are you relocating? If so, You could send everything else with your furniture and, if you have one, family.
Actually, my friend is relocating out to the West coast, and I'm taking the ride out there with him. My goal is to bring my bike with us and ride back East instead of just flying back. The whole point of carting the bike out there is to be able to have a good long ride at all. So riding it out there isn't really an option.

As for jewilson's suggestion, what you're referring to is called a "bar harness," or sometimes a "canyon dancer" after a particular brand, but the problem with those is that they keep the suspension compressed for as long as the bike is tied down and they have a tendency to break the filaments of heated grips (unless you get the kind that work just on the steering clamp, and then you still have the suspension compression issue).
 

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kl3640 said:
3) Use tie-downs (maybe with soft-ties) on the rear peg hangers to secure the rear of the bike. Don't crank down enough to compress the suspension noticeably.
.....Any comments?....
The plan sounds good. I've used the front fork method you've described and it is works well (it is how the factory ships them).

The rear, number 3, seems a bit weak. I would think the rear frame would be a better tie down point (I've used it when trailering for track days). It is square and has good strength vertically as well as horizontally. The rear peg hangers are primarily designed for loading from the top, down and not laterally.

.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
BillyOmaha said:
The plan sounds good. I've used the front fork method you've described and it is works well (it is how the factory ships them).

The rear, number 3, seems a bit weak. I would think the rear frame would be a better tie down point (I've used it when trailering for track days). It is square and has good strength vertically as well as horizontally. The rear peg hangers are primarily designed for loading from the top, down and not laterally.

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That's a good suggestion, thank you. Any particular point on the rear frame?

Of the many, many other bikes that I've transported (literally hundreds) the rear peg hangers always worked well because the rear tie-downs are really just to secure the bike laterally, not vertically; howver, in this case, since the front tie-downs will be attached to the bike at such a low point that further vertical stability might be warranted in which case the rear hangers might not suffice.
 

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I towed my "S" over 300 miles at the beginning of June this year for track day... Here's how I got it totally secure with ratchet-style tie-straps:

The Front:
1.) Start by taking the strap end and wrap it around the backside of the "fork" (just above the front fender) and pull the free strap end through the loop hole at the hook end (most of these strap systems have that kind of end on them). Get a "loose grip" on the left side with the ratchet - about an inch of play, while the left side kickstand is down. Be sure to use a cloth rags between the straps and the fork.

2.) Repeat the same for the right and allow the bike to move to a verticle position. Ratchet down the right and left side as needed to get the taught strap and bike that is a verticle as possible.

NOTE: Be sure to wrap the loose end around the ratchet handle and around the ends of the "hook" ends. I usually take this opportunity to wrap around the forks one more time for a "safety" line.

What you'll notice is the bike's suspension will now take the bumps in the road and stay in place nicely.

The Rear:
3a.) This is where it's up to you, but I usually attach to the sub frame (above the pax pegs) and ratchet to where it is taught, but not cinched down tight. You want a little play here for the suspension. If you have a frontal strap failure, you will not lose the bike with this method.

3b.) Another idea is to wrap the strap around the rear wheel and to the other side of the trailer/truck bed to the ratchet. As you pull the strap, keep it tight from the hook side, through the wrap around the wheel, and to the ratchet. This method is only to keep the back end from bouncing around. In the event of a frontal strap failure, it will not keep the bike from falling over...

Anyway - Happy Trails. Just keep checking the straps as you move down the road. Pay attention to the fraying of the straps and replace them is there is any doubt in you mind.

I have lost a bike before while trying to get it to the shop for maintenence. I was lucky not to lose the bike completely, but it did some serious damage to the side of the truck (F-150) and racked the top framing badly - Never was the same bike again...
 

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nix Canyon Dancers

Just got back from Mid-Ohio, 1,000 miles round-trip, towed both my bikes...both had these God-forsaken, ill-conceived contraptions, both damaged all 4 grips. Chucking them, never to be used again, 60 bucks down the tubes. There's a better set-up I saw being used , Cycle Cynch I believe it's called...NO pressure on the grips, much better design.
 

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zombiewolf said:
There's a better set-up I saw being used , Cycle Cynch I believe it's called...NO pressure on the grips, much better design.
Howdy Jimmy,

Are you not reading the posts ;) I hate to hear (read) your suffering.

The method outlined by Jet-A is essentially the same method the factory uses to ship the bikes from Europe. WalMart carries the ratchet straps for something like $20 a pair.

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zombiewolf said:
NO pressure on the grips, much better design.
Jimmy, get a Baxley Sport Chock and you will never have to tie down from the bars again.

Click the pic.

 

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Discussion Starter #12
Yes, CycleCynch are the bar-harnesses that don't apply pressure to the grips. Bar harnesses that put a lot of pressure on the grips (or soft-ties) will often pull the grips loose and outwards, often damage grip-heater filaments, and can damage plastic throttle-tubes.

But even with them there is still the issue of extended duration suspension compression during long-hauls, which is why I'm going to use the soft-ties on the front wheel harness method. It has the advantages of allowing no slack to develop in tie-downs since the suspension bouncing has no effect on them, it will not keep the suspension compressed for long periods of time, and I can safely ratchet down on them with a fair amount of force. I'll let a little bit of air out of the front tire and let it take the compression force. In fact, I'll let out enough that the tire going flat won't allow any detrimental amount of slack in to the tie-downs, but not so much that the sidewalls or the wheel itself will be damaged. In the highly unlikely event that the tire does lose pressure, the wheel-chock should prevent any tipping.

I'll use the bar harness as a backup and to prevent excessive bouncing, but I'll keep the down-force to a minimum.

As for the rear, I'll wrap the wheel to provide lateral stability and anti-bounce protection, but no significant downforce.

Thanks all for the help!
 

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thanks gentlemen for the feedback, live and learn, right? RickD, definitely getting the Baxleys, what's another 500 bucks to protect $30k, and it looks hassle free. Interesting, you only use 2 tiedowns...no need for anything in the rear I take it. And it looks like you're not really compressing the suspension at all. Again, thanks all.
 

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Baxley Sport Chocks

I also use Baxley Sport Chocks to hold two bikes on my trailer. Best thing I've bought. I ride the bikes on the trailer, the front wheel locks in the chock, and I get off the bike. Put the tie downs on the rear, and I'm done. No mess no hassle no stress. And it's just as easy to get the bikes off. I think they were around $250 each with mounting hardware. And the "chome black" looks good with the gray K1200S and my wifes black R1200C.
 

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zombiewolf said:
Interesting, you only use 2 tiedowns...no need for anything in the rear I take it.
Although they say it is not necessary, I use two
tie downs for the rear as well. Talk about solid.;)
 
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