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I highly recommend the book "Proficient Motorcycling" by David L. Hough for beginners and experienced riders alike. Frankly, it should be mandatory reading for all riders.

I try to keep a copy on my shelf. The problem is that I keep giving my copy away to motorcyclist friends, which is what happened recently.

I ordered a replacement about two months ago, the 2nd Edition of the book. It finally arrived yesterday. I assume that there were delays at the publisher. The 2nd Edition comes with a bonus CD ROM, too.

Why am I posting this to the K1200GT forum? Because the picture on page 10 in the Introduction section shows the author on a current model K1200GT.
 

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Lieu
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Agreed. This is a very good book to explain the basics of motorcycling.

I would also add that for beginners, it is imperative to take a beginners riding MSF class. Experienced riders benefit from taking the experienced riders course every few years.

Of course, any other professionally taught riders class will help improve and maintain the riders skill level.

Stay safe!
 

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I got the first one and the second one. Pretty good reading. I read his first book the first 100 pages of advrider face plant before I started riding. It's where I fell in love with bmw motor bikes.

Good stuff,

Gravity
 

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Agreed, it's a great read that should be mandatory.

I'm curious as to what's on the CD.

Although I have to differ on the ERC. I'm sure it's a great thing for many folks to do. But I took one last year and frankly I was bored all the way through it. Many of the other riders were failing the u-turn box, whereas I was doing figure-8's one-handed.

I'm now looking into advanced riding schools such as those held on a track where you can get individual attention based at a much higher level.
 

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Buy a dirt bike! You don't need no stinkin books

I my perfect world everyone would learn to ride in the dirt.


Norris Cooper Andover Kansas USA
06 K1200GT
93 K1100RS
 

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Meese said:
Although I have to differ on the ERC. I'm sure it's a great thing for many folks to do. But I took one last year and frankly I was bored all the way through it. Many of the other riders were failing the u-turn box, whereas I was doing figure-8's one-handed.

I'm now looking into advanced riding schools such as those held on a track where you can get individual attention based at a much higher level.
I guess you just have to remember that they probably have to teach to the lowest level of skill for the people in the class. ANY ongoing training is better than none. :teeth
 

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ncooper said:
Buy a dirt bike! You don't need no stinkin books

In my perfect world everyone would learn to ride in the dirt.
+1

Now I need to work on my mind when I ride in the dirt, its 18 but the body is 65+
Those damn insufficient funds checks
 

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Falconfire said:
I guess you just have to remember that they probably have to teach to the lowest level of skill for the people in the class. ANY ongoing training is better than none. :teeth
I totally agree. I was confused as it was billed as an "experienced" rider class. I guess that means that you've been riding the bike for a year or more rather than still learning where all the controls are.

Having said that, several of the folks couldn't do the u-turn box, and at least one guy dropped his bike. Now most of them were riding LT's, but I think overall they found the class quite useful.

It just showed me that I need to go to a more tailored riding class, such as those offered by Reg Pridmore or Streetmasters.
 

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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
Meese said:
...I'm curious as to what's on the CD...
I opened the CD yesterday. It was in a thin plastic CD envelope covered horizontally with a 2 inch wide theft-deterrent tape. The visible part of the CD label says "Proficient Motorcycling, BONUS CD from Motorcycle Consumer News" and "Subscribe to MCN now at [website]..." and a copyright date.

The theft-deterrent tape cleverly covers the part of the CD label that describes the actual contents, which reads, "3 FREE Full Issues (144 pages) Featuring: * Decisive and informative motorcycle tests * Unbiased product reports, news, and information - much more! * Plus, MCN's latest Performance Index".

The theft-deterrent tape leaves a sticky residue on the outside of the CD envelope and the inside back cover after it is removed. Yuck.

Because the tape covers the essential part of the CD label that shows its contents, the purchaser has no way to know what is really on the CD. In my opinion, it is a deliberate, calculated attempt to mislead a prospective buyer into believing that there is more value to the CD than it genuinely has.

The CD contains the October, November, and December 2007 issues of Motorcycle Consumer News (MCN). Each issue has its own folder with the corresponding PDF files inside. There is one PDF file for each column, feature, or article. In addition, there is a separate PDF file containing the Winter '07/'08 version of their Performance Index from the January 2008 issue. The Performance Index is a large table comparing specifications and tested performance (e.g., horsepower, torque, 0-60 times, etc.) for a long list of consumer motorcycles. That's all.

Others may see value in the CD, but I don't. In my opinion, it fails to live up to the promise on the front cover, which says, "FREE CD! 144 Bonus Pages". I incorrectly assumed that the CD would contain additional articles, commentary, and/or materials written by the author (David L. Hough), and directly related to the book. Instead, all I got was an enticement to subscribe to MCN.

The questionable value of the CD will degrade over time. Three years from now in 2011, who will want to read three 2007 issues of MCN? Oh wait, the purchaser won't know until they get it home...

In my opinion, the CD is a blatant rip off, and makes hollow the sense of integrity and trust that the author conveys to the reader from his excellent text. It is my fervent hope that he was not involved in any of the decisions related its inclusion as a sales enticement for the book.

Hopefully the updated text in this second edition will meet the expectations of added value for those readers who already had copies of the original, but were excited by the idea of a "Bonus CD".
 

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+1 on Dirt!

ncooper said:
I my perfect world everyone would learn to ride in the dirt.

I just ordered the book, but agree, it is a huge advantage to learn on the dirt. I rode enduros then motocross in the early 70s.

Our bmw group has 15 riders signed up for the ERC next month, I could cheat and take the Versys (lots easier to manuver in tight spaces).
 

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dhanson said:
Our bmw group has 15 riders signed up for the ERC next month, I could cheat and take the Versys (lots easier to manuver in tight spaces).
If you really wanted to impress everyone, you would take a Boss Hoss for the course! :teeth
 

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a good read!

After I broke my leg on my '06 BMW GT and had to stay in bed for five months I had a lot of time to read. I picked up both books by David Hough and read every word.
Since then I have been telling ALL my biking friends to pick up his book(s) and read them. We tend to forget all the little details that make up good biking. I am convinced that re-education is necessary. I think one of the main issues Hough addresses is how we become complacent so quickly. We are all guilty of this. I guess that is why we have most accidents a few miles from home.
I have not seen the latest edition but will pick it up since my edition was borrowed and I probably will never see it again.

I also strongly recommend that you spend a few bucks and a few hours and read "Proficient Motorcycling." He made one point that if I had followed his advice I would not have broken my leg. That is...if your bike is starting to fall over jump off!!! Like an idiot I put my right leg down thinking that I could hold up a 625 pound bike with my skinny leg. It got underneath the bike and broke into 9 or so parts. Oh! the bike suffered $2500 dollars worth of cosmetic damage which would have happened if I had jumped off and just let it fall over. I also learned that one wants to buy a GOOD pair of riding boots. Like an idiot all I was wearing was my hiking boots. I purchased a pair of desert alp boots from Veranami on the phone with my leg in a cast. I will NEVER ride any bike without ALL the proper gear. You have a long time to think about all of this when you are in bed and now going through rehab.
I sure wish I had read this book prior to September 1st, 2007!!

Mr. Pete--->
 
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