BMW K1200, K1300, and K1600 Forum banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
468 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Here's another for ya, boy am I the new guy or what!

Camelbak systems. Yay? Nay? Pros and cons? What say you fellow GT owners and riders (I like the sound of that, GT owners, hehehe).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
549 Posts
Keep mine in my tankbag. The only way to go if you're going to take a trip.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
75 Posts
I used a Camelbak for a SS1000 (Chicago to Denver) in July a few years ago. It was about 104 degrees when we went through Omaha, and it didn't improve much from there. I'm not sure I would have made it without the Camelbak. The only thing to remember is that the first sip, after a long interval between sips, can be pretty warm.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
130 Posts
Camelbak YES

1. If I'm trying to make miles in summer, the camelbak works well & is really helpful. Avoids that pre-dehydration head fuzz in the afternoon.

2. I'm a Camelbak brand fan, since the company was the 1st to really open the market.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,658 Posts
I find one useful if it's really hot and I'm going across lots of miles with few places to stop in between. I also find them to be a pain in the ass cause when it's hot enough to use they get piss warm before I can even get half way through them. I tried stopping and putting ice from the store in it but also a pain. Find it just as easy to buy a cold drink from the same store, probably easier. However they do serve their purpose in keeping the dehydration from coming on too quick.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
37 Posts
If you wear a full face helmet, you'll want the 90 degree mouthpiece adapter so you can get the thing in your mouth. I have one attached to my forest fire pack for the summer, handy to be able to drink and work. The insulated pouch and hose are a must to keep the water somewhat cool. the bite-valve cover is nice too, keeps the valve free of dust/bugs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
52 Posts
Yes the insulated drink tube is a must. I beleive it is actually sold as a cold weather option to keep the water in the tube from freezing, but works just as well to keep the water in the tube cool between slurps in the summer. The kit also includes a cover for the bite valve also to prevent freezing.

I fill my 100ml pack with ice, then top off with water, and its usually good for 200 miles in the heat. The regular intake of the H2O prevents the mind and body numbing of dehydration.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
468 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
sportfaller said:
If you wear a full face helmet, you'll want the 90 degree mouthpiece adapter so you can get the thing in your mouth. I have one attached to my forest fire pack for the summer, handy to be able to drink and work. The insulated pouch and hose are a must to keep the water somewhat cool. the bite-valve cover is nice too, keeps the valve free of dust/bugs.

Is this an option available when you purchase it or some kind of add-on?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
52 Posts
The 90 deg adaptor and the insulation package are both options.
 

·
Would rather be riding
Joined
·
537 Posts
I gave it up.

Robert_W said:
Find it just as easy to buy a cold drink from the same store, probably easier.
I gave up on trying to make a camelback work for me, as you say it was a pain in the butt to keep cold and refill, and I always had leak issues.

I end up stopping every couple of hours for gas or food anyway. (Might as well alternate those stops, it takes just as long to gear up to ride across the street to a restaurant as it does to ride 100 miles to a restaurant...) I usually have a bottle of water and some snacks stuffed in a bag just in case there's nothing at the gas station.

But then I've also got decent fat reserves so I don't seem to have a problem going for a few hours without a drink or going half the day without food. Drives my wife nuts.

You know all this talk about riding is really making me itchy to get on the road... how many more years 'till my 2 year old daughter can ride on the back??
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
231 Posts
I've been a CB fan for years.

To keep the water cold I use those "blue ice" things (http://tinyurl.com/5qkzyu). At night I toss one in the freezer and then fill my CB about 1/3 full of water and toss it in the freezer as well.

The next morning I fill the CB with water and put it into it's case. I shove the blue ice alongside it. Note that I'm a "moteler" and my room usually has a refer (if it does not have one then I ask the desk clerk for one... they often have them available).

A tip I picked up from some other smart biker: many gas stations have little stores attached to them and they have self-serve drink dispensers that also dispense ice. I take my CB in and ask the clerk if I can top it off my CB with ice. In my experience the clerks always say yes and they don't charge me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
498 Posts
In particular you need one if you are going for distance.

Like some said, if you don't plan on tank to tank to tank rides and eating miles, you might hold off.

The 90 deg. valve is good, but I recommend the insulated tube for the nozzle cover. (I don't think they are compatible.) Another trick to keep the first sip cold is to blow back into the tube when your done drinking so there isn't any water in the tube to get hot.

Another problem can be drinking too much causing more frequent stops for bladder relief than for gas. DAMHIK
 

·
Strafist
Joined
·
2,544 Posts
I use a platypus in the tank bag. Over the years you kinda get in the know how much to drink for tank to tank rides to coincide with piss breaks.

My stops usually consist of gas, pee, power bars and hit the road. Folks usually don't like riding with me when I beat feet.

I keep a case of water on the backseat of the floorboard of la trucka and am used to drinking it warm, so it doesn't bother me drinking it warm (or hot as the case may be).

YMMV.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top