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Discussion Starter #1
Just turned over 9k today there is the goofy brake pad sensor light staring back at me. I figured it was a false indication after having read previous posts here. I know all 3 sets are in good shape because I just completed a tire changeout 1k ago and inspected them carefully. Mucho pad left!

I plan on changing to aftermarked pads and doing the work myself when the time comes..............

however, can the sensors be bypassed? Permanently?




2007 Deep Blue Metallic
 

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Dunno.

But maybe if the wires are cut (open circuit), that will keep the light off. Of course, if it is a stored code, then you may need something like the GS-911 tool to reset it so it is turned off.

All speculation on my part. :confused:

Mack
 

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I think it is the other way 'round. If the wires have continuity, OR a specified resistance, you could do it up at the plug and it would be out of the way. Just stick an ohm meter on them before you go cutting or crimping...

I plan on doing that one day, so I still have the front and rear old pads with the plug I'll need.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
So those of us that want to avoid the big buck beemer pads by going aftermarket are stuck with the warning light?

I'm not electronically saavy................has anyone out there gone to aftermarket brake pads? I can follow on the electronic stuff if someone blazes the trail.

:dunno:
 

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Now that we're done with the speculation :) the sensor is simply a wire loop embedded in the brake pads. When the wire wears through and breaks the connection, the warning light comes on. Some bikes have had the sensor wires break due to being zip-tied too tight at the factory, triggering the warning light.

To disable this, simply unhook the sensor wire at the first connection up from the brake pads and insert a jumper wire into the upstream plug (not the side attached to the brake pads). The connection will always remain made and the warning light won't come on again.

Personally, I don't have any problems with the factory brake pads. They give great braking and feel and seem to last fairly well depending on how you ride. Sure they're stupidly expensive, but then again you did buy a BMW. ;)
 

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Meese said:
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To disable this, simply unhook the sensor wire at the first connection up from the brake pads and insert a jumper wire into the upstream plug (not the side attached to the brake pads). The connection will always remain made and the warning light won't come on again.
...
Do you know if it requires resetting of the bike's computer with either BMW's Motoditec (sp?) or something like the GS-911 - or is it reset with the jumper alone if the light is already on?

When I require pads, I may call Brembo and try and buy them direct as my friend did on his old R100GS. Pads to him were only $15 from Brembo's online distributor or $50 from the dealer. Quite a price difference.

Mack
 

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I'm not sure if it requires a MoDiTec reset or not. But I'm sure that if it did, a GS-911 tool would take care of it.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
The Facts at Last : )

Thanks Ken.......that clears it up.

I'm thinking in this direction because I do all of own tire changes (2-3 sets/yr) and have frequent opportunity to examine the pads so I can forego the cost of the factory pads.
 

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What equipment are you using to change the tires? I've had 5 fronts and 8 rears in 13 months on my GT and it's time for another set. I really need to be able to change them at home at my convenience.
 

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Meese said:
What equipment are you using to change the tires? I've had 5 fronts and 8 rears in 13 months on my GT and it's time for another set. I really need to be able to change them at home at my convenience.
I do my own. Just did the front last weekend.

I bought both the front and rear Pit Bull stands from Cycle Gear. I get nervous when the bike scoots forward on the center stand when I use the front alone. You may be able to figure a way to keep that from happening like make sure the Pit Bull stands wheels keep moving towards the rear of the bike when you lift it, or secure the stand to the front somehow.

The BMW bead can be a bitch. I got one of those large black pincher clamps used for the job. It has a lead-screw in the middle and you turn the nut to pinch the beads together. It's a bit tight for the 180 size rear but it works.

I use a couple of aluminum car jack stands from Harbor Freight along with Marc Paynes wheel balancer that will do both rear and front if you order the right one. Works really nice and easy.

Takes me two good size tires irons and a small one along with 3-4 of those nylon rim protectors Cycle Gear uses on their changer.

Some Yamaha Tire Mounting Lube in a spray can works wonders too. One side will pop back on with it, the other, not so easy. It gets a bit sticky in time and seals the bead tight.

You may want to get one of Dennis Kirk's aluminum right-angle stems and get rid of that upright rubber one when you do the rear. That upright rubber stem always made tire pressure checking and filling a pain.

Oh, it helps to lay the tire in the sun and get it hot enough to be pliable. If you do it in the snow, you'll cuss enough to melt the stuff.

Mack
 

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Meese, I built a homemade clone of the No-Mar works pretty well, but I need help holding the wheel, mounts on my truck trailer hitch.

The fancy breaker/install bar is the key part along with the HDPE wheel holders, also the tire lubricant/grease is important as well. These tires are very stiff!
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Tire Change Info

There is an excellent article here: http://www.clarity.net/~adam/tire-changing.html

I bought everything I needed to get this going for about $220.

*Marc Parnes Balancer- Call Marc directly @ (714)842-9210, he will usually answer the phone and can help make sure your getting the right pieces and parts for your specific rims. Also see marcparnes.com

* You do not need a fancy expensive bead breaker- I have open studs in my shop and just attached a 6' section of 2x4 to one of the studs as a pivot point and use a 1' piece of 2x2 to apply pressure down on the bead. More than enough leverage to easily break the bead.

* Get at least 3 tire irons- I prefer the 15" curved ones. I got mine through Competition Accessories. They provide additional leverage if needed.

* Rim Protectors are a must- buy several sets as they may chip and break after several uses. There are alternatives, as mentioned in the article linked above, however, I like the way the commercial ones fit the rims.

As for the tire changing process--- as with anything new, the first time might be a struggle, but after you get through it a couple of times you work out the kinks. I've got it down to about 1.5 hours from removal from bike, old off, new on, balance, and reinstall on bike. I'm saving $50 everytime I do it. I live in a small podunk town where good service is not readily available for this stuff.

This is more than worth the effort and you have all the conveniences of your own tools and work space.

:clap:
 

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Meese said:
When the wire wears through and breaks the connection, the warning light comes on. Some bikes have had the sensor wires break due to being zip-tied too tight at the factory, triggering the warning light.
Can someone point out where the cable failure point is? Is it possible to look at how the cable is secured and improve it to avoid the problem?

Thanks in advance!
 

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cbdane said:
Can someone point out where the cable failure point is? Is it possible to look at how the cable is secured and improve it to avoid the problem?
Follow the sensor wires from the brake pads up to the first socket/plug. Look for zip ties that are pulled very tight, causing the wires to kink or stretch. Cut of those zip ties and reroute the wires so there is a bit more slack.

Or wait until it fails and get free brake pads from your dealer. :)
 

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Thanks for the tire advice, guys. I have a Marc Parnes balancer and I've used the no-Mar mount/demount bars which work great if you have something to lever them off of. I've also seen the car rim method before - guess I need to visit my local junkyard. :)

I've mounted ME880 tires onto LT rims so I know what you mean by stiff tires. In contrast, the Avons are soft enough that you can practically throw them at the rim to mount them. :)

I've been lazy because my local Cycle Gear will mount/balance for $20 each, but I'd like to have that capability in my own garage.
 
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