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For those owners of '06 new gen 1200GT: My local dealer recommended a new cam chain for my bike because it was on 70k km - with dire warnings of expensive failure.

I bought all the parts and did the job myself at home. Tips: The clutch cover is held on by about 18 Torque aluminium screws. These MUST be replaced at $61 a set with new screws every time they are removed. The first brand new screw torqued up to 5nm and snapped off. Drilled it out and tapped to next size up (8mm). Threw away the rest replaced the whole lot with Allen head stainless steel screws (torqued up to 5nm) Screws are 6mm and a set of stainless was $14. Now fine. Inspection showed no sign of real wear in the chain, or guides. No discernible stretch in chain but some side flexibility. Slight rounding of teeth on the cam shaft sprocket. Replaced, anyway. Only vital special tool needed is the BMW locking pin (goes in the hole used by the crankshaft sensor). That's a must-have. Forget the $100 coil removal tool (total waste of money) as the shoulders on the coils break because of age/heat. Anyway, coils pop off easily with a flat screwdriver. Also forget the $250 BMW pliers used to removed hose clips. I used wire strippers (90 degree return on the nose of each blade). Also, no worry about pressurising the coolant refill at the end of the job. You can refill without pressure.
Took a couple of days (doing other things while having access) including engine and final drive oil changes and No probs or issues encountered. Cost was about $500 for parts compared with $2000 for dealer to do it.
 

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Quickie said:
For those owners of '06 new gen 1200GT: My local dealer recommended a new cam chain for my bike because it was on 70k km - with dire warnings of expensive failure.

I bought all the parts and did the job myself at home. Tips: The clutch cover is held on by about 18 Torque aluminium screws. These MUST be replaced at $61 a set with new screws every time they are removed. The first brand new screw torqued up to 5nm and snapped off. Drilled it out and tapped to next size up (8mm). Threw away the rest replaced the whole lot with Allen head stainless steel screws (torqued up to 5nm) Screws are 6mm and a set of stainless was $14. Now fine. Inspection showed no sign of real wear in the chain, or guides. No discernible stretch in chain but some side flexibility. Slight rounding of teeth on the cam shaft sprocket. Replaced, anyway. Only vital special tool needed is the BMW locking pin (goes in the hole used by the crankshaft sensor). That's a must-have. Forget the $100 coil removal tool (total waste of money) as the shoulders on the coils break because of age/heat. Anyway, coils pop off easily with a flat screwdriver. Also forget the $250 BMW pliers used to removed hose clips. I used wire strippers (90 degree return on the nose of each blade). Also, no worry about pressurising the coolant refill at the end of the job. You can refill without pressure.
Took a couple of days (doing other things while having access) including engine and final drive oil changes and No probs or issues encountered. Cost was about $500 for parts compared with $2000 for dealer to do it.
You can get an inexpensive, well-made coil removal tool from Marc Parnes for $US 25 here:
http://www.marcparnes.com/BMW_Plug_Tool.htm

Of course, if the shoulders on your coils are already broken off, it might not make a difference. I know more than one rider who damaged their ignition coil by using a screwdriver to remove it. I also know other riders who used a screwdriver and it worked out okay.

Others have tried the radiator refill without vacuum, but they reported overheating issues. The problem is that without the vacuum, there will be air pockets in the nooks and crannies where the coolant will not go. There are a variety of ways to do the vacuum - you can buy third-party tools to do it (I have a MityVac MV4535 that works with an air compressor). Here is a link to a clever homemade vacuum filler:

http://www.i-bmw.com/showthread.php?t=38146

Vacuum fillers must be important, otherwise there would not be so many options to buy for cars and motorcycles.
 

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bmeaden said:
Hello, wondering y dealer said u needed chain . i also agree that u don't need pressure to refill cooling system.
I will repeat my warning that refilling the radiator without using a vacuum system may lead to overheating or continuous fan running situations.

See RFW's post #31 in this thread, which explains why vacuum refilling is important:
http://www.i-bmw.com/showpost.php?p=448927&postcount=31
http://www.i-bmw.com/showthread.php?t=37484

I know RFW. He is one of the most capable and knowledgable people I know, especially when it comes to maintaining a K1200GT. I will personally vouch for RFW and his expertise.

I did a quick web search and found other examples of overheating or fan running all the time (never shutting off) that were fixed by performing a proper vacuum refill. In fairness, there were some posts that disagreed or offered suggestions on how to do a bleed-style refill.

I bought a MityVac and will continue to use it. What you do is your decision. It is your bike, of course.
 

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Coolant

Hello,not questioning anybody's expertise , lots of information on forum
Just how I do it on cars and bikes, I'm sure there are many good ways to
Do it, including vacuum
 
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