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OK Guyz, having gotten my bike back repainted after my recent Yosemite misadventure with the pavement in a parking lot, I'm looking for advice and link pointers to some sort of clear plastic covering. I have in mind a clear plastic sheeting which I can apply myself to the vulnerable parts of my tupperware, especially the side case lids, main fairing panels, and the front piece which surrounds the headlight....
 

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Thanks men. I left a message for a small company in Garden Grove to call me. Reading all the 3M websites, it appears that the Scotchguard stuff is better left to installation by professionals. I wanted to do it myself, but I'm going to get a price quote before I go any further.
 

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Try a company I used on my Triumph right across the street from Irv Seaver, Permier Protective Films, did a great job at a reasonable price. Their phone number is:

714 628 0100
 

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Chuck.. I've been using the Tankslapper.biz stuff for years..It's the FIRST thing I do to every bike I own... Really pays off in the long run especially when you're getting ready to sell a bike. Chimp easy to install.. they make 2 versions.. the 3M peel-n-stick stuff and their own material which goes on with water.. if you get it wrong just pull it off and reapply.. I swear by those guys... My 2 doubloons.

chuckwilmot said:
Thanks men. I left a message for a small company in Garden Grove to call me. Reading all the 3M websites, it appears that the Scotchguard stuff is better left to installation by professionals. I wanted to do it myself, but I'm going to get a price quote before I go any further.
 

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Snider's Paint Guard from Aerostich works great... its also removable. you can take it off and putt it back on again. Goes on with water. Peels right off. had mine in place a few years no yellowing.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks to all for the the advice and suggestions. I have a lot of leads, and now I need to do the research and see which is going to work the best for me. That's what I love about this board! I can throw up a post with a question and within a day people from all over the world offer their real world experience. It just doesn't get any better than that.
 

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chuckwilmot said:
Thanks to all for the the advice and suggestions. I have a lot of leads, and now I need to do the research and see which is going to work the best for me. That's what I love about this board! I can throw up a post with a question and within a day people from all over the world offer their real world experience. It just doesn't get any better than that.
When you're done with the research, would you mind sharing with the class? :)
 

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Cost Effective Paint Protection

I've used Xpel down in Texas on several bike projects and have found that their products were equivalent to 3M and less expensive than other source I've found. The film is self adhesive, comes with instructions, and an applicator, is available in a variety of thicknesses, as well as bulk if you don't want to go the kit route.
I used 6 mil on the paint and purchased their 50 mil for headlight protection.
Here's the contact info right off the front page of Google:

Paint Protection Film - XPEL Technologies Corp.
Invisible Clear Paint & Headlight protection kits for all cars, motorcycles, trucks and rv's.
www.xpel.com
Paint Protection Kits
Locate an XPEL Dealer
Headlight Protection Kits

Products
Installation Videos
Installation Instructions
About XPEL

When applying this type protective film I found it helpful to make templates of butcher paper first. Then I traced the outline of the template on the paper side of the film using a sharpie. I cut the film with either a very sharp blade or scissors. Remember pattern reversal as part of that step if you mark the paper side of the film. Make sure the painted surface is clean and free of wax. Thoroughly wet the paint with the recommended alcohol/water mixture using a fine mist spray bottle. Then as you peel the paper backing from the film wet the adhesive side. Don't touch the adhesive side with anything including your fingers. Your finger print will stay put. When you apply the adhesive side to your paint the film should slide around freely. Squeegee from the center out to the edges using the supplied tool forcing the liquid out to the edges. It's difficult to get rid of bubbles so try to avoid making any in the first place. Also I'd recommend starting on as flat a panel as you can to gain experience. Compound curves are tricky because you have to stretch the film as you move along. If you have any film overhanging the edge of the surface you covered it can easily be trimmed with a very SHARP blade.
 

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BE CAREFUL!!! I applied stone guard film as per instructions using water, on my main panels. Unhappy with the result I lifted the film, and to my horror, the clear coat with it!!! What happens is that when you push the water out from under the film, the water is also forced into tiny stone chip holes in the clear coat where it reacts with the water based base/colour coat. Result - a complete respray to fix my f#@kup. Naturally, being the bloody perfectionist that I am, the entire panel work has been resprayed when it was in good condition to start with. The cost of the film was 80.00, and the charge to apply it (had I gone that way) was only 50 bucks. Instead its cost me several grand for a respray. The only up side is that I've had a ceramic clear coat applied that is awesome and as hard as nails.
 

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Complications

The advice Flyingkiwi provided is valuable. I'd not experienced a similar problem but I haven't done 100 or more so my sample is to small to be statistically valid.
The alcohol water solution, not just water, speeds evaporation and adding a few drops of liquid detergent will lower surface tension both contributing to a better application.
Its always good to have many comments in these forums. The collective provides a great deal more value. :ghug:
 
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