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I picked up a 2005 BMW K1200s with 5800 miles a couple months ago. Been riding it as weather permits to get used to the bike and the only real complaint I have is the clunky shifting particularly 1st to 2nd, 2nd to 3rd....the higher gears are fine. I have a friend who has had a lot of different BMW motorcycles including the older K bikes and he tells me that all BMW's of that age and older were clunky but had longevity or would last forever. I am asking the group if there is any remedy for the clunky behavior or is there possibly something wrong that requires the shop taking a look?
 

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2009 K1300S, 2017 S1000R & 2021 Vespa Primavera clown paint job
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It is the K12 clutch. much to read on forums and YouTube. It can be fixed. First tip, do not go into neutral at stops. Do not start the bike in neutral. Stay in first gear. Easy on the clutch, try feathering it some. Here is some thoughts on the K12 clutch. The K13 clutch is much better, you can buy the parts either on Ebay for a good used one or new. Or better yet have John Sykes rebuild it for you.
 

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I picked up a 2005 BMW K1200s with 5800 miles a couple months ago. Been riding it as weather permits to get used to the bike and the only real complaint I have is the clunky shifting particularly 1st to 2nd, 2nd to 3rd....the higher gears are fine. I have a friend who has had a lot of different BMW motorcycles including the older K bikes and he tells me that all BMW's of that age and older were clunky but had longevity or would last forever. I am asking the group if there is any remedy for the clunky behavior or is there possibly something wrong that requires the shop taking a look?
The K1300 has bearings I'm ordering these bearings from eBay: TRB RC 8x14x4mm Precision Ball Bearings ABEC 3 Rubber Sealed BLU (4)
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Sloppy Shifter Fix!!! | BMW K1200, K1300, and K1600 Forum
https://www.k-bikes.com › ... › K12/1300GT (Next Gen)


Feb 28, 2009 — I replaced the OEM plastic bushing with a stack of 4 bearings and the mod transformed the shifting into a smooth and precise action
 

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It is the K12 clutch. much to read on forums and YouTube. It can be fixed. First tip, do not go into neutral at stops. Do not start the bike in neutral. Stay in first gear. Easy on the clutch, try feathering it some. Here is some thoughts on the K12 clutch. The K13 clutch is much better, you can buy the parts either on Ebay for a good used one or new. Or better yet have John Sykes rebuild it for you.
My ’05 K12S will not start in first gear, I must be in neutral.
 

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The K1300 has bearings I'm ordering these bearings from eBay: TRB RC 8x14x4mm Precision Ball Bearings ABEC 3 Rubber Sealed BLU (4)
View attachment 28475
Sloppy Shifter Fix!!! | BMW K1200, K1300, and K1600 Forum
https://www.k-bikes.com › ... › K12/1300GT (Next Gen)


Feb 28, 2009 — I replaced the OEM plastic bushing with a stack of 4 bearings and the mod transformed the shifting into a smooth and precise action
Please report back with results, I may do this as well. I’m having sloppy shifts from 2-3rd
 

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Sloppy Shifter:
I did this a couple of months ago. It does change things but it's not a cure all. Shifting is smoother, but transmission is still a clunker. You can by the kit or save $ and buy just a few parts.
Here is my post.
 

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Or better yet have John Sykes rebuild it for you.
(y) (y)

Had John rebuild my clutch around 38k miles. I also had the thrust adapter machined for more oil flow into the clutch.
Shifts like a dream now with only have a slight clunk N > 1st.


 
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Every wet clutch clunks into 1st.... what are y’all complaining about?

I ordered the bearings, what do I need now?
 

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You will need a washer with a shoulder at the inside hole of the washer or a small spacer/sleeve the thickness of a washer and diameter of the inside race. Again, the trick here is so that when you tighten the bolt, it puts pressure on the washer, or spacer, or washer with a shoulder that only puts pressure on the inside race of the bearings. Otherwise when you tighten the bolt it will lock the lever and it will not move. Loosening the bolt a little until the lever moves defeats the whole purpose of this modification.
28514
 

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Ah I see, so all the bearings are stacked.

Can't I simply drill out a smaller washer?
 

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Ah I see, so all the bearings are stacked.

Can't I simply drill out a smaller washer?
I used 4 bearings and don't have this problem.
To use the existing shoulder washers just make them shorter.
They are made of plastic, cut each to about half the width and then file to correct fit.

Shifting is much better but I also cleaned and lubed the entire assembly.
I bought this bike used and upshifting was painful.
By lowering the foot lever lever to below parallel shifting became more natural
 

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Bmw's have had clunky gearboxes ever since I can remember with my first one, a 1962 R69S. Out of curiosity, I read some of the detailed things on this thread that have been done to solve a non problem that seems over the top to some.
Congratulations to all on your ingenuity, perseverance and effort! I'll spend my time with performance upgrades to either handling, output or some of the real weak spots. 38k on my 2006 S with clunky tranny and alls well. My riding style includes constant hot shifting but fortunately, not all the time with the torque this motor develops!
However, especially if new to BMW's I can see some folks thinking somethings very wrong...
 

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I picked up a 2005 BMW K1200s with 5800 miles a couple months ago. Been riding it as weather permits to get used to the bike and the only real complaint I have is the clunky shifting particularly 1st to 2nd, 2nd to 3rd....the higher gears are fine. I have a friend who has had a lot of different BMW motorcycles including the older K bikes and he tells me that all BMW's of that age and older were clunky but had longevity or would last forever. I am asking the group if there is any remedy for the clunky behavior or is there possibly something wrong that requires the shop taking a look?
My 2006 K12R is still a bit clunky. First to second is still long. But it was improved immensely by both the bearing kit (I got the one from Finland) and replacing the ball-joint shift rod-ends with tie rod ends. This took about 1/4" of free travel out of every shift. I got the bearing kit off eBay (sorry, I can't find the details). I used McMaster-Carr as supplier of American-made, stainless steel, teflon-lined tie-rod ends (they come in left and right threads, you need one of each), and M6 10.8 hard bolts. Got some special washers, seals and tie rod washers from same place. Both of these improvements are not as weatherproof as the OEM solutions--the stock shifter bushing is so loose and easygoing, nothing would ever sieze it, and the stock ball joints have rubber booties.
 

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Bmw's have had clunky gearboxes ever since I can remember with my first one, a 1962 R69S. Out of curiosity, I read some of the detailed things on this thread that have been done to solve a non problem that seems over the top to some.
Congratulations to all on your ingenuity, perseverance and effort! I'll spend my time with performance upgrades to either handling, output or some of the real weak spots. 38k on my 2006 S with clunky tranny and alls well. My riding style includes constant hot shifting but fortunately, not all the time with the torque this motor develops!
However, especially if new to BMW's I can see some folks thinking somethings very wrong...
.9887
Bmw's have had clunky gearboxes ever since I can remember with my first one, a 1962 R69S. Out of curiosity, I read some of the detailed things on this thread that have been done to solve a non problem that seems over the top to some.
Congratulations to all on your ingenuity, perseverance and effort! I'll spend my time with performance upgrades to either handling, output or some of the real weak spots. 38k on my 2006 S with clunky tranny and alls well. My riding style includes constant hot shifting but fortunately, not all the time with the torque this motor develops!
However, especially if new to BMW's I can see some folks thinking somethings very wrong...
[/Q
Bmw's have had clunky gearboxes ever since I can remember with my first one, a 1962 R69S. Out of curiosity, I read some of the detailed things on this thread that have been done to solve a non problem that seems over the top to some.
Congratulations to all on your ingenuity, perseverance and effort! I'll spend my time with performance upgrades to either handling, output or some of the real weak spots. 38k on my 2006 S with clunky tranny and alls well. My riding style includes constant hot shifting but fortunately, not all the time with the torque this motor develops!
However, especially if new to BMW's I can see some folks thinking somethings very wrong...
No one said this was very wrong.
This was a very simple fix and well worth the small amount of time and money. Every modification no matter how simple is to make a bike faster and safer, The bearing addition is just part of dialing the bike in.

Ergonomics are more important than hardware. I spent a lot of time modifying the seat to lock me in place.
Before that it wa Helibars and hand grips. Right now tires are the weakest link.

If you've only ridden BMW's then you have no idea what a smooth trans or a fast bike is,
 

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My 2006 K12R is still a bit clunky. First to second is still long. But it was improved immensely by both the bearing kit (I got the one from Finland) and replacing the ball-joint shift rod-ends with tie rod ends. This took about 1/4" of free travel out of every shift. I got the bearing kit off eBay (sorry, I can't find the details). I used McMaster-Carr as supplier of American-made, stainless steel, teflon-lined tie-rod ends (they come in left and right threads, you need one of each), and M6 10.8 hard bolts. Got some special washers, seals and tie rod washers from same place. Both of these improvements are not as weatherproof as the OEM solutions--the stock shifter bushing is so loose and easygoing, nothing would ever sieze it, and the stock ball joints have rubber booties.
Can you post a picture? Also more detail about the tie rods. Thanks
 

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I must be doing something wrong here. I just got my bearings with the intent of installing them, and boy am I glad I didn’t remove the bushing. It doesn’t fit. See pictures.

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I must be doing something wrong here. I just got my bearings with the intent of installing them, and boy am I glad I didn’t remove the bushing. It doesn’t fit. See pictures.

View attachment 28540 View attachment 28541 View attachment 28542 View attachment 28544 View attachment 28545
Of course it fits.
You didn't remove the sleeve!
Take out both shoulder sleeves.
Cut each to half their width
Install bearings where the metal spacer was.
insert shoulder sleeves
 
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