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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm planning a January trip that's gonna head up through some mountains, and it can get pretty flipping cold there. By anyone's standards, not just mine. ;) I've never done this sort of thing on a bike that's this much less protective than even the RS. We don't get a lot of practice with cold weather riding around here. . . .

For you guys in the cooler areas of the country, what has been your experience in riding the S in cold weather? Do your legs and feet stay pretty warm? Or will I need head-to-toe gerbings? I have the stock windscreen, I'm getting a little dubious about that too. I have warm stuff, but the only heated clothes I have is a vest.
 

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I have no problems riding the KS or any bike in cold weather. What will stop me is an icy or slippery road. Be sure you know what is up ahead.

Everyone is different when it comes to what gets cold. For me, it is the fingertips. Heated gloves are a must for me when riding in the cold for an extended period of time. Have my gloves connected to Widder arm chaps and vest. I weat thick cotton sweat pants under some lined touring pants. Warm socks are helpful with good boots. Next most important garment for me after heated gloves is a thick turtle fur balaclava to wear over the head and cover the neck.

With the preceding I ride year round at altitude in the Rockies, but I know not to mess with roads offering minimal to no traction. HTH.
 

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I will wear Gerbings--jacket, pants, socks, glove liners when I take a long trip in the cold. Otherwise, for short rides--like commuting--I can get by wearing my winter riding suit. A hood and neck protection is a must.
 

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cold

Gerbings jacket...including sleeves and neck - vest is not enough. Also the heated glove inserts. Otherwise ski underwear, top and pants; midweight or more. Cover the neck too, up to chin and lower ears. Outer layer needs to be wind/waterproof. I'm OK down to the high 20's. Other post's warning of ICY roads is best advice. If the road ahead is shiny - assume it's ice.
Went to Montreal last year early Nov, last 1 1/2 hrs at 35 degrees and light rain/snow....warm as toast. BTW, cars give you more room because they assume you're insane.
Good luck.
 

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I went for a ride on my S last Sunday, 34 degrees. I found that my feet get colder on the S then they did on my K1200rs. The heated socks would really help.
 

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go to www.wintersilks.com

I ride with the heaviest grade silks they offer and don't need to layer up as much as I used to. I use it all, top to bottom and can ride in sub-zero farenheit all day. Top to bottom: balaclava, long-sleeved t-shirt, glove liners, pants, socks. Couple it up topside with a turtleneck shirt, Gerbing jacket, full leathers, I'm good to go. The trick is to keep out wind, no exposed skin...
 

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cblanchard said:
I went for a ride on my S last Sunday, 34 degrees. I found that my feet get colder on the S then they did on my K1200rs. The heated socks would really help.
Got to agree.

Rode mine yesterday early AM @ 32F & my feet got chilly after a couple of hours. I wore a 'stich with a bmw e vest & my shoulders got coolish 'cause of the wind blast. Was wearing jeans, long sleeve t & light sweater. Speeds were 75 - 95 mph.

Hands were toasty, alternating between l/h with insulated gloves.

On the way back it was 41F & I was very comfy.

Hope this helps.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks guys, this helps a lot. I was getting a bit concerned after a short ride a few days ago, in only slightly cool weather. I noticed my feet actually feeling cool as well, something that normally only happens in truly cold weather on an RT or RS. (actually I can't recall my feet EVER getting cold on an RT!) Since temperatures on this ride have gotten down to 10 F in the mornings in the past. . . :eek:

I think I have to agree that with all the airflow the full jacket liner is likely a good idea as well as some lower body heat. And I absolutely agree about a balaclava- nothing makes as much difference as that.

I guess it's time to visit the motorcycle store again- oh, the horror. Fortunately my S has the touratech power distribution system and I have two additional full power outlets. . .
 

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Just came back from a 2 hr. ride early this afternoon. Temps in the mid 20's here in Central NJ. Not bad, lots of cops however so my speeds were in check the entire ride.
I was the only bike on the road. Heated grips on (one dot at first, then full power towards the last 30 mins.) and full leathers. Feet got cold. That's it.
Supposed to warm up Sat and Sun.
Hope you all are having a great holiday.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Bruno, temperatures have varied on this ride from year to year, but when it's cold it's COLD. 10 degrees F one morning, fortunately that year I had my 1150RT and was quite comfy with an insulated suit and a vest.
 

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kkugel said:
Bruno, temperatures have varied on this ride from year to year, but when it's cold it's COLD. 10 degrees F one morning, fortunately that year I had my 1150RT and was quite comfy with an insulated suit and a vest.
Alright. If you think it might help, I have a section on cold weather riding tips.

http://pages.videotron.com/mcrides/cold_weather/going_distance/going_the_distance.htm

Though in the mountains at 10F, is there no snow and ice. :eek:


Best,


Bruno
Montreal, Canada
http://pages.videotron.com/mcrides
 

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Calories = heat

Another factor to consider is your food intake. As I said in the title, calories equal heat.
A 30 mile ride to get breakfast when it's cold is not the same as the same ride in mid summer.

Consider your food intake before your ride. BUT, also remember that if you have a BIG meal, more blood will be shunted to your stomach to help digest said meal. You need blood flowing at your, er, extremities. That's why a h/vest is great; it keeps the body core warm so that blood CAN be used to heat extremities.

My regular commute to work is, as a matter of fact, 30 miles; it's often +2F or +4F when I'm heading home at night.

Have fun. Be careful.
 

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Corbin has heated seats

You winter riders might want to check out www.corbin.com. They've got (I think) a very nice seat offering, and you can optionally get heat. I'm thinking of a heated front and a smuggler trunk. I may go with the reat also and swap it w/ the smuggler as needed. The only real issue is the $$$ - doesn't come cheap, that's for sure:

wo heat w/heat
front $269 $399
rear $269 $399
smuggler $599 $599
backrest $219 $219

total $1,356 $1,616

I'm still chewing on it. I actually find the stock seat pretty good on its own. The heat and trunk though are pretty nice. Maybe Santa will be good to me :)
 

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bradness said:
You winter riders might want to check out www.corbin.com. They've got (I think) a very nice seat offering, and you can optionally get heat. The only real issue is the $$$ - doesn't come cheap, that's for sure:
Heated seats feel good. Especially on those cold and damp days. In those conditions, just sitting on warm seat is nice. I've tried them on the latest BMW's. And they will transfer some heat. I think of it as a feel good item.

But if you're thinking of a heated seat in terms of cold weather riding, you might consider heated pant liners from Gerbing instead. That's what I use. You just can't compare in terms of amount of heat transferred to your body. They will heat your hips, thighs, knees, and shins. Your lower body will feel warmed.

In addition, just wearing them not plugged in provides a good layer of additional insulation. So for not much more $$, you get a lot more body heat with the Gerging heated pant liners. Just some thoughts from someone who does a fair bit of cold weather riding.


Bruno
Montreal, Canada
Gerbing Heated JACKET LINER Review
http://pages.videotron.com/mcrides/product_evals/gerbing/liner.htm
:
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Thanks Bruno, there's some good stuff on your site! I remember from my X-C skiing days how important it was to keep fueled; it was pretty much snack or freeze.

I got in another ride in cooler temps and noticed my outer thighs were throughly chilled although I had a very warm riding jacket on. I've ordered the complete gerbings set just to be safe. Thanks, guys.

:D
 

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kkugel said:
I got in another ride in cooler temps and noticed my outer thighs were throughly chilled although I had a very warm riding jacket on. I've ordered the complete gerbings set just to be safe. :D
Indeed. The feeling of warmth over your hip joints and knees, not to mention outside of thighs, feels extremely soothing.

Once you taste it, :sun: you're reluctant to go back to that cold feeling. It's very much a question of added comfort. :thumb:




Bruno
Montreal, Canada
http://pages.videotron.com/mcrides
 

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YUP, head to toe Gerbings...that's me in the winter. I did have to install two additional BMW power outlets on the battery cover direct connect to the battery to handle the load however. I got my bike last March in New Jersey and my feet and arms would freeze on sub 50F days...not now! Remaining flexible is a priority so layering clothes (and what to do once you stop) wasn't an option...the Gerbings are light and do the job right.
Pete
'05 S
 

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BCC said:
Got to agree.

Rode mine yesterday early AM @ 32F & my feet got chilly after a couple of hours. I wore a 'stich with a bmw e vest & my shoulders got coolish 'cause of the wind blast. Was wearing jeans, long sleeve t & light sweater. Speeds were 75 - 95 mph.

Hands were toasty, alternating between l/h with insulated gloves.

On the way back it was 41F & I was very comfy.

Hope this helps.
By the way, I found that BMW's Tourgard jacket was much more windproof than the 'stich. I think it's the Cordura versus whatever BMW uses. I noticed that with the Darien and the Roadcrafter. The BMW wins here on warmth in the cold.
The KS is much cooler than the KRS as to the feet and bottom of the legs also, as someone noted here. So you need something besides cordura for legs too. BMW has the Streetgard pants to go with the Tourgard jacket. I'm going to try that instead of the Darien pants.
 
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