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Discussion Starter #1
I am geting ready to replace my clutch (typical slipping and oil leaking from right side casing joint) and associated parts and wanted to compile a complete list of parts, part numbers, costs and so on that can be posted on the list. I have reviewed much of the archive and this info is kind of spread around, with differing viewpoints and part names that differ from the BMW part names. I'd like to ask for your help in making this a list that anyone can refer to and use without all the searching around. When updated I will repost the list in an easy to read format.

The goal is a single complete list to quote and order to do the job - once hopefully - in one sitting.

If you would look at the attached Word table and either post a reply or modify the document and reload it (if this is possible) that would be great.

I don't know which component group to find the rear main seal (is this the same as the engne output seal?), transmission input seal, or transmission shaft seal (are these the same?) part numbers for example.

Do you replace the clutch housing?

Why are there differing part numbers for the same part on Max's list for example? Are these updated parts, or related to early or late series models?

If you order a complete clutch output cylinder (same as the slave cylinder, yes?), does this include the felt and other recommended parts for this piece, or do I need to order more separate parts in addition? Does this include the push rod, and is this even needed?

I have seen the 'spring' mentioned, but not sure if it relates to the clutch or the output cylinder. If the cylinder is it included in a complete unit?

Hope this makes sense! Hopefully we can make this easier for the next person and reduce the repetition on this topic. Thanks...
 

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These are the two transmission seals
23 12 7 667 733 shaft seal
23 12 7 656 019 shaft seal

I think this is the rear main seal
11 11 7 666 186 shaft seal

There are only 6 clutch washer/bolts needed and not 8 as the parts fiche says.

I don't think the clutch basket would need replacing unless there are visible sign of damage. The pressure plate maybe if its high mileage or shows signs of heat damage.

Maybe someone else cold verify the seal numbers. I did it this summer but cannot find the parts invoices.
 

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Probably should mention some "special tools" (or at least ones that you may not have on hand).

To remove the swingarm, you should have a heat gun and long breaker bar. The locking rings and pivots are going to be tight! I'd recommend impact sockets for loosening. A 30mm for the locking ring and a 14mm for the pivot pin using the breaker bar and lots of heat for both.

To assemble the left side, the threaded ring (12mm allen wrench) is a low torque compared to the counter ring (30mm socket) so the threaded ring needs to be held in place while the counter ring is torqued tighter. I used a 30mm deep socket and ground a hole in the side so I can slip the 12mm allen key through to hold the innner piece while I torqued the 30mm (see pic)

I also used a piece of aluminum with the old clutch bolts to hold the clutch basket from spinning when removing and installing the center nut (see pic).

Hope this helps.
 

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Make a list.

You might consider this. I just completed reassembly of my R11R after doing some work on the transmission. At every step of the disassembly I wrote down the date, what the part was that I disassembled, whether I needed to torque bolts on reassembly, and any new parts I needed for the reassembly such as new flywheel bolts, clutch bolts, input shaft seal, etc. When you've got the bike all the way torn down you've now got a list of parts to buy. Yes, it takes a bit longer and you can't buy parts up front but I have never been able to predict ahead of time all the parts I'll need for reassembly and I got tired of multiple part orders. Worked like a charm.

Also, it forces you to look at the list in reverse order on reassembly and not skip any critical steps, especially torquing the bolts.

Mark
 

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Good suggestion, Mark. I also use a digital camera as a shop tool. I take lots of pictures as I dissemble just in case memory fails me.
 

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Good suggestion! the digicam date stamps the pics so you can 'reverse order' them on the pc and that helps re-assembly. I never thought I'd be using a laptop in the workshop with service steps spreadsheet, torque data, Service manual and photos for servicing - but I do now.

Another thing I've done for years is use 2 or three plastic cutlery trays to hold bits. That way you can group bolts and parts together in the compartments and since they are for draining, you can wash parts through as well. When you come to re-assemble, a part left over should start alarm bells sounding.



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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks, good ideas and comments. I will compile into a procedure, including photos, tools, etc. It should help me organize the work better anyway. A holiday project.

Any other comments on the list of 'recommended' replacement parts?
 

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zip lock bags

voxmagna said:
Good suggestion! the digicam date stamps the pics so you can 'reverse order' them on the pc and that helps re-assembly. I never thought I'd be using a laptop in the workshop with service steps spreadsheet, torque data, Service manual and photos for servicing - but I do now.

Another thing I've done for years is use 2 or three plastic cutlery trays to hold bits. That way you can group bolts and parts together in the compartments and since they are for draining, you can wash parts through as well. When you come to re-assemble, a part left over should start alarm bells sounding.
I put all small parts into zip lock bags and label them with enough detail so there is no question how they go back together. At the end of disassembly I may have a dozen or more bags. For example, number the bolts that hold the gearbox onto the engine and number the gearbox holes that they go into.

Yes, the digital camera is indispensible. Here is a photo from 2003 gearbox removal that I referred to a couple of weeks ago to remind myself how I extracted the gearbox:

Mark
 

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Discussion Starter #9
97 K12RS Clutch Parts List Update

I put together a list (this is an image so it can be read on one page - can't upload and .xls file for some reason) of the possible replacement parts, excluding damage that might happen during dis-assembly - which won't happen! to start. Some of these I will not need, but it seems like a clean first cut. These are stock prices. It is interesting that the add ons almost double the cost of just the clutch parts of $350-400 that I have seen.

Now I'll have to resolve which parts need replacing due to wear, and which I should replace because I am already in there. I have about 28,000 miles on the bike.

I may not need the slave cylinder bleed hose arrangement as noted, nor all of the transmission seals, though there aren't a lot of dollars in just the seals. I understand the push rod may be reused if the tip is not burned. And I imagine an experienced tech might select certain big clutch components to reuse, but I'd like not to do this again for awhile if I can help it.

I am taking photos, will turn on the date for sequencing, as I go along.

I am curious to see if more of this kind of work will be done as these bikes age and get more miles, or if they will be scrapped as people buy new ones. I'm guessing they will be on the road for a while and more of this kind of work will be done.

I will incorporate any thoughts, or corrections as they appear.

Velomaxx (soon)
 

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