BMW K1200, K1300, and K1600 Forum banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
62 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I was sitting here looking through some posts on the PCIII, and thinking about this raised the question as to what the difference would be between a GT sold in the US, and one sold in the EU.

The first thing that comes to mind is emission control, especially for CA. This however, is not a fundamental difference. Having said that however, the emission controls here are also quite strict (I am talking of CH. DE and elsewhere, I have no knowledge)

But what would the fundamental differences be? (if any)

Lets put a 'frinstance out there.

1. I move to the US, I bring my GT because I have spent ungodly amounts of dosh on Farkles. I can't really see too much to do. The Farkles I am talking about here are not modifications to the engine and racing exhaust systems etc. (you would assumedly have to comply to some sort of noise check as well) but I mean the prudy Farkles like chrome :teeth

2. One of you Blokes in the US decide to move to the EU. Because you have also spent far too much on Farkles, you bring it with you, and you go into the Motor Registry to get thing registered. I know from experience with my V-rod, there were some minor changes to the lighting and since I had lived in the US for a while, I did not have to go through the sales tax exercise, since it was considered part of my personal effects, and not as an 'import' as such. The paperwork was a real pain, but the actual inspection was dead easy.

Anyway, enough dribble from me for the moment, and lets see what you blokes have to say. :)

Bloke
 

·
Would rather be riding
Joined
·
537 Posts
BigBloke said:
But what would the fundamental differences be? (if any)
It probably depends on the state, but FWIW I once brought a Canadian GPZ into California, and had a very easy time of it since the bike had a few miles on it. (CA doesn't like people bringing brand new non-CA vehicles into the state.) Even California doesn't have smog requirements for motorcycles, they just looked for a particular sticker on the bike and that was it. There are no horsepower restrictions in CA, and the minor differences with lighting rules weren't a problem. I just had to get used to converting Km to Mi in my head.

I later tried to take a US bike to France and ran into horsepower restrictions that made it impossible. So I drove the bike anyway, just left it registered in the US for the duration with (fairly expensive) pan-European trip insurance from some company in Germany. Never had a problem, but having the insurance sticker seemed more important there than having the plates.

As for the GT, I can't think of any issue that would prevent a European GT from being registered in the US, as long as it wasn't brand new.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,397 Posts
BigBloke said:
I was sitting here looking through some posts on the PCIII, and thinking about this raised the question as to what the difference would be between a GT sold in the US, and one sold in the EU.

The first thing that comes to mind is emission control, especially for CA. This however, is not a fundamental difference. Having said that however, the emission controls here are also quite strict (I am talking of CH. DE and elsewhere, I have no knowledge)

But what would the fundamental differences be? (if any)

Lets put a 'frinstance out there.

1. I move to the US, I bring my GT because I have spent ungodly amounts of dosh on Farkles. I can't really see too much to do. The Farkles I am talking about here are not modifications to the engine and racing exhaust systems etc. (you would assumedly have to comply to some sort of noise check as well) but I mean the prudy Farkles like chrome :teeth

2. One of you Blokes in the US decide to move to the EU. Because you have also spent far too much on Farkles, you bring it with you, and you go into the Motor Registry to get thing registered. I know from experience with my V-rod, there were some minor changes to the lighting and since I had lived in the US for a while, I did not have to go through the sales tax exercise, since it was considered part of my personal effects, and not as an 'import' as such. The paperwork was a real pain, but the actual inspection was dead easy.

Anyway, enough dribble from me for the moment, and lets see what you blokes have to say. :)

Bloke
(Assume that you are moving from the US to Europe...)

Gauges and displays will have the "wrong" units. They read in miles and gallons, not kilometers and litres. The TPM will have pounds/square inch instead of bars or pascals (??). The analog speedometer has both mph and kph, but kph is in a smaller font. The fuel gauge and tachometer will work the same, but the cost to get the fuel gauge to move from the bottom to the top will be much higher in Europe. :)

I presume that the BMW dealer can reprogram the computer displays to change the units for the local region.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
604 Posts
Other than having a headlight and taillight I'm not sure of any real restrictions on bikes over here. The noise restrictions are usually local matters (police enforcing complaints). As for smog and the lighting (turn signals) those are manufacturers requirements. After you own the bike you can pretty much do as you please.

Have you seen what extremes Gold Wing or HD riders go to ? :yeow: :yeow:
 

·
Rider Journeyman
Joined
·
502 Posts
Short answer

If you talking about a late model BMW, no problemo.... California and Euro III are the most advanced with the Fed EPA about 2 years behind.

here is a link to a general description: CLICK HERE
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top