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Discussion Starter #1
The PO lowered the rear of the bike by modifying the rear shock. If anyone has their 02 KRS on the center stand, could you measure how high the rear tire sits off the ground so I can get an idea of how much it’s been lowered.

My rear tire sits 2-5/8” (67mm) Off the ground while on the center stand.

Thanks and cheers!
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks!

2000 K1200RS on the center stand, my rear wheel is
1-1/4 inches off the ground, 32mm.
I appreciate your help
 

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The PO lowered the rear of the bike by modifying the rear shock. If anyone has their 02 KRS on the center stand, could you measure how high the rear tire sits off the ground so I can get an idea of how much it’s been lowered.

My rear tire sits 2-5/8” (67mm) Off the ground while on the center stand.

Thanks and cheers!
I currently have 2 K1200RS in my garage: mine and another from a friend (temp storage).
Both are so-called "facelift" models 2nd generation K1200RS - 2nd gen are 2002-2005 for USA market, 2001-2005 in other markets.

1) One has the stock 170/60 profile tire mounted on the more common 5.00 inch rim: off the ground distance is 15/16 inch (or 23.8 mm)

2) The 2nd one has 180/55 tire mounted on the optional 5.5 inch rim: off the ground distance is 1-1/16 inch (or 27 mm)

This difference in height is pretty close to the difference in tire height profile variation between 180/55 and 170/60 (about 3 mm difference normally).
Measurents done on a flat cement garage floor that is pretty good but not perfect...

Clearly your 2-5/8 inch is excessive assuming the front fork are really extented - they should be when on the center-stand with no weight on seat or bars.

IMPORTANT: besides the tire/rim mounted, one ALSO needs to consider a custom "torque link bar" (between frame and rear-drive) that might be installed on yours. These where not very common, made by 3rd party accesory shop in Europe - these allowed to change the lenght of the Torque-link, thus changing the height of the rear-drive slightly in relation to swing-arm.

See attached photo for a stock "torque link" made of 2 simple bars. I am aware of 2 custom variations and they both look very different, so easy to spot.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I currently have 2 K1200RS in my garage: mine and another from a friend (temp storage).
Both are so-called "facelift" models 2nd generation K1200RS - 2nd gen are 2002-2005 for USA market, 2001-2005 in other markets.

1) One has the stock 170/60 profile tire mounted on the more common 5.00 inch rim: off the ground distance is 15/16 inch (or 23.8 mm)

2) The 2nd one has 180/55 tire mounted on the optional 5.5 inch rim: off the ground distance is 1-1/16 inch (or 27 mm)

This difference in height is pretty close to the difference in tire height profile variation between 180/55 and 170/60 (about 3 mm difference normally).
Measurents done on a flat cement garage floor that is pretty good but not perfect...

Clearly your 2-5/8 inch is excessive assuming the front fork are really extented - they should be when on the center-stand with no weight on seat or bars.

IMPORTANT: besides the tire/rim mounted, one ALSO needs to consider a custom "torque link bar" (between frame and rear-drive) that might be installed on yours. These where not very common, made by 3rd party accesory shop in Europe - these allowed to change the lenght of the Torque-link, thus changing the height of the rear-drive slightly in relation to swing-arm.

See attached photo for a stock "torque link" made of 2 simple bars. I am aware of 2 custom variations and they both look very different, so easy to spot.

It looks like I have the stock torque link bar. I think the PO cut the lower shock bottom attachment About 1-1/2” and redrilled the bolt holes very close to the bottom of the shock body.

I’m probably going to buy a new replacement shock.
 

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It looks like I have the stock torque link bar. I think the PO cut the lower shock bottom attachment About 1-1/2” and redrilled the bolt holes very close to the bottom of the shock body.

I’m probably going to buy a new replacement shock.
A brand new shock from BMW dealer is listed at $US$ 1283 and is TOO EXPENSIVE compare to better after market options. Plus, the after markets ones are rebuildable when they get old (depending on your type of riding this can be 30,000 to 70,000 miles).

The best value for money in after market rear shocks are: YSS and YACUGAR . If you are willing to pay over $US$ 1000, the WILBERS are also very good but more expensive. In my humble opinion, for the average rider doing street riding (not racing) the OHLINS are too expensive and too fragile.

Contact TED PORTER a Beemershop to get good / honest advice on your suspension options.
The page for suspension of K1200RS on his web site: https://www.beemershop.com/category/suspension-products-122.html

FINALLY, your less expensive option is to go USED on EBAY. Many years ago (around 2010), I bought a set from a low mileage parted K1200RS on EBAY. It was cheap and the shocks were in pretty good shape. Now in 2020, buying these type of wear items on EBAY is a hit-and-miss proposition: these bikes are all getting pretty old (age and mileage) - some have not been maintainted properly... Furthermore, the stock factory rear shock (made by SHOWA) is not rebuildable - although I have occasionalyy heard of a few shop in USA who could do it - so they said... (no proof)
 
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Sailor - thanks for all the great suggestions. I had noticed that a YSS rear shock runs about $450. I’m deciding between that and a low mileage (but old) EBay shock. I’m an old good weather weekend rider on the flat straight-roads down here in Louisiana so I’ll probably try a used shock first and then go from there.

On a similar note, I’m wondering if the PO might have lowered the front end. The only way I know to do that is to raise the legs up in the triple tree (on non-BMW bikes). Is it possible to lower the front end of a KRS?

Thanks again
 

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Sailor - thanks for all the great suggestions. I had noticed that a YSS rear shock runs about $450. I’m deciding between that and a low mileage (but old) EBay shock. I’m an old good weather weekend rider on the flat straight-roads down here in Louisiana so I’ll probably try a used shock first and then go from there.

On a similar note, I’m wondering if the PO might have lowered the front end. The only way I know to do that is to raise the legs up in the triple tree (on non-BMW bikes). Is it possible to lower the front end of a KRS?

Thanks again
Because of the so-called TELELEVER type front suspension, moving the fork tubes up/down has no effect like on a conventional front forks design. The TELELEVER design has a separate horizontal arm between frame and lower triple clamp PLUS a front shock attached to this arm.

The only way to lower the front is to EITHER:
1) create / modify a different horizontal "A-ARM". Not likely as no one has ever offered this as an aftermarket item.

2) buy a shorther front shock - this was offered by some after market shocks when making a custom order

3) used a smaller diameter wheel / rim that would fit this set of forks and axle. Not very likely such thing exist and easy to check on tire marking - stock tire size/ diameter is 120/70-17.
 
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Discussion Starter #9
OK. i brought it to a independent shop in New Orleans and they installed the rear shock (EBay $75 from an ’01 with 15000 miles). I also had them flush the brakes, clutch, coolant, and change the fuel filter and spark plugs. I rode 150 miles and I‘m happy. I can use the center stand now and the bike is back to its original configuration. Nothing left to do but ride now in spite of the 110 degree heat index. 🔥🌞🔥
 
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