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Discussion Starter #1
Just for grins I though I'd post an early look at an article I wrote that will be published (sometime) in the BMW Owners News mag. Since I have learned so much on this forum, I thought I'd try and give something back. Hopefully you enjoy.
 

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Nice Article

I've read about top athletes explain the same process. Never thought about applying this process to riding. Interesting.
 

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Cool!

I enter those zones in the twisties, think I could go for hours. Had one last saturday with a riding buddy leading. We were pretty aggressive and I was pushing but not pushing him, taking alternate lines, him inside, me outside, next turn him outside, me inside, all while watching the next turn up ahead and preparing exit and speed for the next turn.

A lot of data and input going on during those sessions. How close is his pegs coming, will he touch, if he does where will I go, can I stop and miss him if he has trouble. No road exit space at all, deep steep ditches, trees adjacent.

Keep steady pace, buddy knows I am close, but he also knows that I am not going to pass or endanger his ride.

GREAT FUN! Big grin factor.

We rode about 300 miles round trip to get a 12 mile stretch of twisties, ha.
 

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Article

I enjoyed your article. I've felt exactly what you are referring to in music (guitar player), in sports and in riding. I sometimes find that I am forcing my concentration while riding. Seems that work and other crap can creep into my head where it doesn't belong. When I feel it happening, I make note and focus my concentration back on the road and the ride. It is much more enjoyable when you become one with the bike and the concentration comes without conscious thought. I'll give your meditation exercises a shot. It'll probably be a great break from work stress too.
 

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Great article.

I completely agree with you - and your suggestion to others re: concentrating on your breathing during a meditation exercise. This is right on the money!

Years ago, when I first started learning Kung Fu, I didn't understand why we started each class with 10 minutes of meditative breathing. Over time I began to understand that this exercise helped to clear everything away and made me sensitive to what was immediately important - what was going on in the class. Everything else just dropped away.

I tried this same concept one day before going on a ride - and found that my ability to react to my environment was quicker, my riding was better and more enjoyable and at the end of the ride I felt physically and mentally refreshed. Needless to say it was a personal epiphany and one I try to use in several parts of my life.

I'd like to add one thing to the article's suggestion though that may help others regarding the breathing. Don't think about breathing into your lungs (I know, this is going to sound odd) but think about breathing down into your belly. Most people breathe too shallow - only filling the top part of their lungs with air. If you think about bringing the air down to your belly (and yes, let it extend as it wants/needs to) you're drawing a deeper breath and it will work better. This also has the effect of getting more air volume in your lungs, which helps oxygen absorption etc. That said, don't 'over think it' - as then you'll be distracting yourself and taking away from the overall goal of meditative breathing.

Again, great article - and I hope this helps others out there as well!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks to all for taking the time to read it. As I suspected: most riders recognize 'the zone', although everyone calls it something different.

Mjkuhno: I intentionally kept it very simple in the hope that some would at least try it. If they see that it is just like the physical skill set, i.e.: something that can be improved with practice, then hopefully they will find the resources on their own to better understand the 'how to' aspects. I also did not mention eyes open vs eyes closed, again on the assumption that those interested will find resources that will explain how eyes open more readily translates to daily life.
 
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