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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Emergency braking: engaged or disengaged clutch?

found this on i-net http://www.fmq.qc.ca/pdf/amorce-freinage_eng.pdf

just one question(not to be lost in translation :) ) : during acceleration(not in downhill riding cases, of course) it remains engaged?

and do we disengage it coming to complete stops to avoid stalling of the bike? Am I correct?
 

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easyman05 said:
found this on i-net http://www.fmq.qc.ca/pdf/amorce-freinage_eng.pdf

just one question(not to be lost in translation :) ) : during accelarion(not in downhill riding cases, of course) it remains engaged?

and do we disengage it coming complete stops to avoid stalling of the bike? Am I correct?
Roger that!...Recent studies have found that most riders who do not put their feet on the ground when coming to a complete stop on a motorcycle will fall over....For a minute there I thought the US tax payers were paying for this...Thank you Canada!
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
if so, those guys rotated the world ..:) I was sure the best results in emergency braking could be achieved with engaged(not pulled in) clutch....:)
 

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Discussion Starter #4
what is meant by "declutched"? bike in Neutral? or in gear? or the clutch lever is not pulled in? or the clutch lever is pulled in?

or :
the lever is pulled in = the clutch is engaged
the lever is not pulled in = the clutch is desingaged?
 

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easyman05 said:
what is meant by "declutched"? bike in Neutral? or in gear? or the clutch lever is not pulled in? or the clutch lever is pulled in?

or :
the lever is pulled in = the clutch is engaged
the lever is not pulled in = the clutch is desingaged?
lever pulled in would be disengaged
 

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Discussion Starter #6
it means they achieved the best average result(the shortest way till stop) with pulled in clutch? without engine braking?
 

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easyman05 said:
it means they achieved the best average result(the shortest way till stop) with pulled in clutch? without engine braking?
This is just wild speculation, but perhaps it is faster to disengage the clutch than roll off the throttle for engine braking. If you can't roll off the throttle quickly enough (and the engine lag is not brief enough) then the engine is actually still driving the bike forward during the most critical braking time - when the bike is moving at peak speed, and thus covering the most distance.

I was always taught to disengage the clutch instantly for emergency braking maneuvers. During a braking exercise a few years ago, with a class of 80 experienced riders, I had the shortest average braking distance. I wish I could take full credit, but I relied heavily on the ABS in my K1200GT. There were a few RTs and other BMWs with ABS; perhaps their owners weren't as enthusiastic as I was about hammering their brake pads, rotors, tires, etc. There was a variety of bikes at the class, including Harleys with and without ABS, Gold Wings with and without ABS, sport bikes without ABS, etc. A mixed bag.
 
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