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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just swapped my front wheel, and I noticed my pads are sort of thin. Idk how thin is normla, b/c idk how thick new pads are. I just know bike pads are way thinner than car pads, and mine are really thin in the front.

I’m thinking of just ordering the pads ahead of time so I have them on hand should I have to replace them.

I think EBC are the go-to?
 

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I was looking at those since I heard good things about them. Then I just went to Max BMW and bought a set. I dont ride enough anymore to worry about the price difference as long as I do the work myself.

I think you’ll be fine with EBC. Beech has put some serious miles on over the years. I would like to hear his thoughts. Keep us posted.
 

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I replaced worn out Brembo with EBC.
The EBC grabbed harder initially, and seemed to go from nothing to full brake instantly.
It took a while to get used to, but I don't notice it any more, so I must have :)
 

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I believe EBC make different grades depending on which brakes you have (BMW or Brembo or even Tokico) and how hard you ride etc.

UK price c.£25/pair - need two pair for front!

thickness when new : 8.5mm
 

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I use EBC "HH" on both mine and my buddies K12's with great results. Also barely any brake dust on the rims. Note: Just be sure to bed the brakes after installation and you wont get that "grabby" feeling which does go away in time if you don't.


29264
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I just ordered a rear set of HH pads through amazon warehouse for like $16, although I recently replaced them. I’ll be on the hunt for front pads. A set runs ~$65 for two right now, but if I can snag an amazon warehouse deal I’ll jump on it.
 

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Anyone used SBS? They're made in Denmark and I noticed that the OEM pads are also made in Denmark. As I recall the EBC pads don't have the vertical lines running through them like the OEM and SBS. Also is it worth removing the backing plate off the worn OEM pads and attaching to the aftermarket replacements?
 

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I use EBC EPFA pads on my K1300GT. They're the fast road/track pad and provide even more power than the HH pads.
They cost about 50% more (roughly £75 instead of £55ish) and they wear out quicker but I think they're worth it for the extra power and fade resistance. They're also supposed to wear the disc less than HHs.
I did like the HHs anyway and found them better than OE but ride quite hard so EPFA suits me.
I bed pads in for 200+ miles - avoid hard/prolonged braking initially but build it up in short doses
Some people claim the HHs wear the discs out quicker than OE. I'm sure this isn't true. I found that when I first fitted them it looked like they were scoring the discs but when I looked closely I could see they were actually polishing and dressing down the slight score marks that the OE pads had created...after a while the disc looked normal again. I (and my brother who runs an MC workshop and fits EBC for preference (and knows the founder) am sure they don't wear the discs any more for a given amount of braking power - i.e. they provide the ability to stop harder if you want but if you don't use that extra power they don't wear your discs any harder than OE
 

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Anyone used SBS? They're made in Denmark and I noticed that the OEM pads are also made in Denmark. As I recall the EBC pads don't have the vertical lines running through them like the OEM and SBS. Also is it worth removing the backing plate off the worn OEM pads and attaching to the aftermarket replacements?
No idea what SBS are like these days but remember them starting up in the late 70s/early 80s and they were awful. Sure they've improved since then of course. Guess the OE's might be made by SBS

Er....NO! It would be suicidal to try to graft backing plates from one pad to the other! And there's no reason to
 

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I just ordered a rear set of HH pads through amazon warehouse for like $16, although I recently replaced them. I’ll be on the hunt for front pads. A set runs ~$65 for two right now, but if I can snag an amazon warehouse deal I’ll jump on it.
I mentioned the EBC EPFA pads. I use them at the front but they're not available for the rear so I use HHs which work fine.
Bedding in is just as important for the rear brake of course.
I find the rear caliper, like all sliding calipers, esp underslung ones, needs thorough cleaning regularly. My procedure (most of which is the same for the fronts) is roughly:
1) Unbolt it and pull the 2 halves apart (rear caliper)
2) Pump the pistons out as far as you can without letting air in. Note whether they move freely or not
3) Floss exposed part of the pistons with waxed dental tape to remove all crud right up to the edge
4) If crud is too caked on (which it can be if you don't clean them regularly), spray with silicon lube and, instead of dental tape, floss with thin strips of the rough plastic banding that you get on packages (it has a gently corrugated surface).
5) Wash with brake and parts cleaner (the volatile stuff)
6) Airline dry/clean (including piston to bore clearance)
7) If 1 or both pistons were at all sticky lube them with Silicon lube, push fully in and pump out again, wipe off lube/any dirt that comes out, repeat
8) When pistons are moving freely brush red rubber grease on near where they emerge from the caliper
9) Push them fully in, pump out, redo red rubber grease, repeat until you're sure there's grease all the way into the bore (don't worry, red rubber grease is high melting point). Push pistons in a bit (but not all the way back to their operating depth)
10) Apply copperslip or wurth or similar high temp lube to the exposed part of the pistons
11) (Rear brake) Remove rubber boots from sliding pins , clean old grease off pins and out of boots and lube pins, holes and boots with red rubber grease
12) Put a little anti-squeal paste on backs of pads - don't overdo it - just needs a fraction of a mm where the pistons touch
13) Reassemble and refit

If you do it with dental tape often enough (once a year for low mileage/dry weather, twice in the UK!) you can avoid the bit with silicon lube and all the pumping in and out and your brakes will always work smoothly without dragging
 

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I use EBC "HH" on both mine and my buddies K12's with great results. Also barely any brake dust on the rims. Note: Just be sure to bed the brakes after installation and you wont get that "grabby" feeling which does go away in time if you don'
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I think those are these?


They’re just under twice the price of the HH brake pads; these:
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
So the rabbit hole deepens.
I’m also looking into Carbone Lorraine


I wish I knew what brakepads I have now. Probably OE? They have plenty of stopping power.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Beemerboneyard has both:

 

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I think those are these?


They’re just under twice the price of the HH brake pads; these:
Yep, those are the ones. As I say the HH are great but the EPFA provide even more bite and fade resistance. Some people might find them slightly grabby for town work and, given that our brake system is servo-assisted, most people will find HH sufficient (and a step up from OE) so won't justify the extra cost of EPFA (they wear out quicker too).

Think I read somewhere that the K1300S holds the record for shortest stopping distance on a bike and beat some cars - the benefit of the very long wheelbase, anti-dive front end, servo brakes and decent ABS.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Yep, those are the ones. As I say the HH are great but the EPFA provide even more bite and fade resistance. Some people might find them slightly grabby for town work and, given that our brake system is servo-assisted, most people will find HH sufficient (and a step up from OE) so won't justify the extra cost of EPFA (they wear out quicker too).

Think I read somewhere that the K1300S holds the record for shortest stopping distance on a bike and beat some cars - the benefit of the very long wheelbase, anti-dive front end, servo brakes and decent ABS.
I’m not surprised in the least. This bike stops so hard when I ask it to, I’m afraid the bike behind me will run into me. Whatever I have on the fronts now provide plenty of brake for me (I assume they’re OEM, but I could be wrong). I’ll likely get the HH, or maybe Carbon Lorraine, since people seem to like those too.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I think the Carbone Lorraine pads might be best considering the servo-assist system negating the need for HH pads.
 

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I quit using the Carbone Lorraine pads because of the excessive brake dust from them. The EBC HH pads have less brake dust.
 

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That’s why I like carbone Lorraine. Less brake dust😁
 
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