BMW K1200, K1300, and K1600 Forum banner
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
87 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Under similar conditions, should I expect gas mileage to decrease a bit in the winter? I generally ride through the whole year, down into the teens, and notice she uses a bit more fuel. Still runs great but enjoys a little more of the premium. Comments??
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
128 Posts
Scientifically.... Yes
As the air gets colder, its density increases... this has two results...
Firstly, the engine recieves more Oxygen, therefore it can dispense more fuel to get more power... upside, More power... downside, more premium
Secondly, denser air provides more wind resistance, thus more power is needed to thrust the bike through the air... Power comes from fuel ....
On the up-side... an engine derives it's power from the expansion of air in the combustion chamber... cooler air entering the engine means a more efficient combustion cycle, so the engine will run more efficiently.
How you ride will determine how these effect your fuel consumption... but generally one can expect a higher overall fuel consumption....
 

·
Addict
Joined
·
3,750 Posts
I think I actually get better fuel consumption because I ride slower, less often and more carefully due to variations on road surface conditions.

Fuel injection atomises liquid petrol. Cold denser fuels and engine can produce larger drops in the injection spray pattern and richer mixtures reducing combustion efficiency. Also the motor will be running richer for longer until the ECU picks up the design engine temperature to lean off the mix. Very cold water in the jackets and rads will also take longer to reach normal operating temperature. My temperature guage consistently reads a bit lower in Winter but I think this is down to the rad sizes, coolant volumes and thermostat bypass effectiveness. The inlet air temperature sensor should also be compensating for cold air. I'd expect compensation to be towards rich rather than lean, because poor combustion with a weak mixture usually produces erratic idle and stalling which we'd all notice. Driving the bike regularly from a heated garage on really cold mornings might be interesting. How does the motor run in the first few minutes?



Never pay again for live sex! | Hot girls doing naughty stuff for free! | Chat for free!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
68 Posts
voxmagna said:
I think I actually get better fuel consumption because I ride slower, less often and more carefully due to variations on road surface conditions.

Fuel injection atomises liquid petrol. Cold denser fuels and engine can produce larger drops in the injection spray pattern and richer mixtures reducing combustion efficiency. Also the motor will be running richer for longer until the ECU picks up the design engine temperature to lean off the mix. Very cold water in the jackets and rads will also take longer to reach normal operating temperature. My temperature guage consistently reads a bit lower in Winter but I think this is down to the rad sizes, coolant volumes and thermostat bypass effectiveness. The inlet air temperature sensor should also be compensating for cold air. I'd expect compensation to be towards rich rather than lean, because poor combustion with a weak mixture usually produces erratic idle and stalling which we'd all notice. Driving the bike regularly from a heated garage on really cold mornings might be interesting. How does the motor run in the first few minutes?
What in the hell is petrol? :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
567 Posts
fuel consumption in colder weather

All this sounds verry scientific and I am sure that it all has a real effect on gas mileage. :rolleyes:

BUT, and a very big but, the gas [petrol??] companies change the formula of their product at different times of the year and this will have the biggest affect on your mileage. In my state, [north carolina] the past several years, oxigenated [sp?] gas has been mandated for the colder months and results in about a 10% drop in fuel mileage.

I suspect that the blend from the gas coompanies will have the giggest affect on your mileage.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
227 Posts
bertbrumfield said:
All this sounds verry scientific and I am sure that it all has a real effect on gas mileage. :rolleyes:

BUT, and a very big but, the gas [petrol??] companies change the formula of their product at different times of the year and this will have the biggest affect on your mileage. In my state, [north carolina] the past several years, oxigenated [sp?] gas has been mandated for the colder months and results in about a 10% drop in fuel mileage.

I suspect that the blend from the gas coompanies will have the giggest affect on your mileage.
I like this answer best. Oxygenates have fewere BTU's (energy) than normal gasoline components, thus the same gallon of gas has less energy. Your bike is using the same energy, it just takes slightly more volume to supply that energy.

Ron
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top