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Discussion Starter #1
I recently rode from Idaho to Seatlle and back for a week long training module. I had ordered the newest version of the GT's seats and decided to try the "low" seat option. Altho comfortable for about an hour, longer than that and I hurt!
I am embarrased about the amount of money I put into the GT to make the ergo's work, and sad to say gent's, I've decided to give up the GT. My 51 yr. old body just can't seem to get comfortable no matter what I tried.

I made the call today, and am working a deal to trade into a 2009 LT, I test drove one, and yes it is heavier ect., but it just fits! I really wanted to make the GT work, but you know what they say, wish in one hand and ......................................

Guess I'll have to change my handle. Been a pleasure here with y'all.
 

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GTdavey said:
I recently rode from Idaho to Seatlle and back for a week long training module. I had ordered the newest version of the GT's seats and decided to try the "low" seat option. Altho comfortable for about an hour, longer than that and I hurt!
I am embarrased about the amount of money I put into the GT to make the ergo's work, and sad to say gent's, I've decided to give up the GT. My 51 yr. old body just can't seem to get comfortable no matter what I tried.

I made the call today, and am working a deal to trade into a 2009 LT, I test drove one, and yes it is heavier ect., but it just fits! I really wanted to make the GT work, but you know what they say, wish in one hand and ......................................

Guess I'll have to change my handle. Been a pleasure here with y'all.
Everyone has a bike that fits them better than others. Good luck with your LT!
 

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Sorry to hear that

Yeah, the GT's the seating position is not for everybody... Took me a while to get used to the MYRP, coming from the GS. Now, I wouldn't trade back.

Hope you'll enjoy the LT!
 

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The LT is a fine bike. I put 108,000 miles on one. Strangely enough, I became extremely painful to ride after I busted out some ribs. The forward ergos on the GT cured that. The wife quitting riding didn't hurt swapping to the GT, either.

See you on www.bmwlt.com! But, don't make yourself a stranger here, either.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
grifscoots said:
The LT is a fine bike. I put 108,000 miles on one. Strangely enough, I became extremely painful to ride after I busted out some ribs. The forward ergos on the GT cured that. The wife quitting riding didn't hurt swapping to the GT, either.

See you on www.bmwlt.com! But, don't make yourself a stranger here, either.
Well,
It sure seems the LT has some issues.
My GT has been pretty near flawless @ 11,000 mi.
I'm beginning to rethink this.
Any input?
 

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GTdavey said:
Well,
It sure seems the LT has some issues.
My GT has been pretty near flawless @ 11,000 mi.
I'm beginning to rethink this.
Any input?
I switched from LT to GT, and am very happy, problems notwithstanding. The seat (and my butt) took about 10k miles to break in, and is now comfortable enough for my 61 year old body.

LT is a fine bike. What drove me away from it is the way I ride - not a lot of long rides, mostly 30 mile round trip commutes, a few 200+ mile rides. LT was just too heavy for my commute routine, which included a fair bit of city riding. GT is a lot more fun, too, but seat breaking in was the key.
 

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GTdavey said:
Well,
It sure seems the LT has some issues.
My GT has been pretty near flawless @ 11,000 mi.
I'm beginning to rethink this.
Any input?
If its only the seat that is causing the discomfort, have you considered a Corbin or Rick Mayer as an option? I gave the stock seat on my '08 GT about 1000 miles before I determined that it was too soft and generated hot spots after just a couple hundred miles (which seems typical for BMW seats - my RT was the same).

So I bit the bullet and bought the Corbin heated seats. They are firm and provide even pressure across the seat. They take about 1000 miles to break in, but after that, no problems. I highly recommend them. The seat heaters plug in to the OEM wiring and are switched just like the stock seats.

I also added barbacks from Suburban Machinery and am riding in comfort now - no more pain between the shoulder blades or in the back.

Good luck with it if you keep it.
 

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What a pity, my GT fits me perfectly, then again I might not like your wife and you won't like mine, each to his own. No offense.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I tried a set of mayers, still sliding forward, my "boys" were not happy being that intimate with the tank!
Next up, a long painfull ride to Russell, and altho they did a supreme job, I was now sitting on top of my GT, not in it, and the boys were still sliding forward at times.(especially while braking)
Then I ordered the new style low seat, while that took care of the sliding issue, but my knees and thighs said get us off now. I thought about lowering the pegs, ect. ect. Where do you stop.?

Grif, I know how advanced the GT is, thats why I bought it. I have never been on a ride so powerful. Trouble is, after an hour or so I am looking for a place to rest for awhile, all that technology (and well done at that in my opinion), and my body says, hey bud are you listeneing to us?
I thought about waiting for the new LT with the new six cylinder motor and all, but from what I hear it is only going to be a hundred pounds lighter, with an increase in HP and torque. The current LT has plenty of both for me. Call me simple.

Lastly, I have a loving wife who loves to ride with me, and after several attemps on the GT she flat stated her head felt like it was a ragdoll from all the buffeting. Even after trying a couple different shields. She told me she wasn't getting back on the GT. Idaho is too pretty of a state to see by myself without her.

From what I am being told (sold) the 2009 LT has been refined and is at the top of its engineering curve with alot of hte earlier issues resolved. Reliabilty is a priority for me and I.ve been told the FD failures were from overloading the LT in most cases?
 

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Have you tried...

the Master Yoda Riding Position (MYRP)?

I gave the stock (low) seat 9,000 miles to 'break in,' but it's just too soft - works for about 150-200 miles, then develops 'hot spots.' Just ordered the Corbin front & back with OEM heat wiring. Pre-MYRP, my shoulders and wrists would start hurting, as well as (occasionally) my lower back; since I switched my riding position (weird in the beginning!), the pains are gone - only the but-burning remains...

Your mileage may vary, but it's an inexpensive way to give it another try?!
 

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The first weekend you and the wife take off on the LT, you will not look back...

The LT is an amazing bike, just give it a few miles and you will be satisfied...They are as reliable any BMW model...4 years and not a problem yet...........Pete
 

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I went from my K1200RS to a new 06 GT and absolutely hated the bikes riding position. I added bar backs and a Rick Mayer seat which was modified by building up the front portion 2 inches and the rear 1 inch. This made all the difference in the world. I too was threatening to go back to my RS. The Rs is sportier on mountain roads but for long rides the GT is better. The LT is just too big of a bike unless you are on want a highway cruiser. I did spend a weekend riding the coast on one and it was a workout.
 

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GTdavey said:
Lastly, I have a loving wife who loves to ride with me, and after several attemps on the GT she flat stated her head felt like it was a ragdoll from all the buffeting. Even after trying a couple different shields. She told me she wasn't getting back on the GT. Idaho is too pretty of a state to see by myself without her.
That ^^^ pretty much sums it up right there.



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This sitting position and master yoda thread interest me. I did 300 miles today around Ohio (all stock except for a beaded seat on top of the stock, much cooler). My wrists and azz hurt like hell.

Tank grips are coming, I think that will help. I just can't squeeze with my legs, I keep sliding. So, this riding position, anyone got pics? I read it twice and just can't wrap my head around what it should look like. I feel like there's a vast distance between me and that tank, I'd be lying down if I leaned forward too it.
 

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Pics

I think on page 5 of the MYRP thread I saw some pics...

When you read through the whole 10 pages, Dick does answer specific questions about "how" to properly do the position. From the posts...
========================
The key parts to "the" Riding Position are:

  • Bend at the HIPS, not waist
  • Maintain a SLIGHT arch to the back, not allowing it ever to "curve"
  • Move the butt AFT so the weight is OVER YOUR FEET.
  • Apply pressure to the feet, using the THIGH muscles, so you are sitting "lightly"
  • ELBOWS BENT, now DROP the hands to the bars.
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Back Arch:

Sit in chair;
Use hands on knees as support;
Bend forward until chest touches or comes closest to knees;
Straighten back;
Remove hands as support;
Lift head up as far as possible, and look forward;
Bring shoulders back as far as possible
Raise torso 3/4 to upright.

99% of folks now have a "slightly arched back". There should be a distinct but mild tightness in the lower back, or lumbar region. The "thoracic" area (That's the area you can feel "between your shoulders") is what I conceive to be "neutral" having its normal bend.

This is a "good" posture for the lumbar region, the area where the majority of back suffering is encountered, especially by Riders. The ERECTION of the back is being conducted by a CONTINUOUS host of muscles from "butt" to "brain". This is EASY to feel and accomplish, and learn to maintain.
-----------------------------
I teach an exercise to help strengthen what we use to support this Riding Posture that incorporates that slightly splayed leg position:

Standing, bend SLIGHTLY at the knees, and place hands on them to support your back;
Spread feet to just beyond shoulder width;
Point feet and thighs outward so a 30 to 45 degree angle is achieved between them;
Straighten the back, and arch it backward slightly --- Hold that throughout;
Keeping the feet FLAT ON THE FLOOR, squat until thighs are parallel to the floor;
Hold that for 10 seconds;
Keeping the posture, raise the butt about 3 inches --- hold for three seconds;
Return to thighs level and hold for three seconds;
Repeat rise and fall 10 times.
End.
==========================

There is not ONE correct position to achieve this, but rather a continuum. Moving your butt back and forth, bending at the waist experiment until you FEEL balanced sitting there, feet on pegs, with your hands merely lying on the bars. It does take some getting used to (relearning the "proper" seating position...), but once found it's absolutely amazing how comfortable a ride you'll have! Try it with the bike on the center stand - you'll feel the balance!
 

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Cleaned up article?

Does anyone have a copy of MYRP or something like it with all "the" extraneous QUOTATIONS and "capitalizations" removed? I find it "nearly" IMPOSSIBLE to read in its current form.
 

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'Other version'

Maybe this'll help; took this from a slightly different, 'sanitized' post on the MYRP...

[You sit on top of a sport bike. You sit within a K1200RS. Sport bikes require getting weight off your butt so the rider can slide his/her butt inside corners to affect a different cg. Consequently sport bikes induce weight on the handle bars. Someone sitting on a K1200RS will note some ergonomic differences, and fall toward, positioning their body as if they were riding a sport bike. They probably also carry forward certain muscle memories developed, from other seating positions.

People have learned to sit upright. It is not a function for which the human body was designed, and continued practice causes damage. Automobiles promulgate the poor seated position. Only lately have they applied several things like lumbar support to keep that position from killing the user. Most motorcycles continue the promulgation to one degree or another. They emulate "sit upright," (so much so that the term UJM (universal Japanese motorcycle) was partially defined by a riding position called - sit up and beg, like a puppy. This position became a mental norm. We think that's how a motorcycle is ridden.

The important thing to remember is you learned to do it that way, and you can learn something else. The largest, developed, muscle memory is the angle between torso and thighs. This is controlled by the largest muscles involved in riding. Southeast Asian peoples go about teaching their kids to squat, and that brings on an entirely different thigh/torso relationship. That posture is much more common across all of Asia. Some things can be difficult to overcome for some folks when they have become habits rather than cognizant, controlled responses. A great example is about leaning motorcycles in corners.

The human develops a sense of danger when leaning any farther than when they stand up. Danger signals are sent when lean angle extends much beyond the angle the neck can be bent and still keep the eyes level (20 to 30 degrees). It is our response to body signals that can make up our "sense" of our comfort levels. Those things can change when we control them, rather than the other way round. The K1200RS was designed to promote a canted forward riding position. This was done on purpose by BMW. They knew it was required to get the K1200RS performing to the desired levels, and to keep the rider comfortable for long periods of time, in the regimes where the bike was intended to be most often used (i.e. not riding on city streets). It all starts with a low seating position -- not a high position like a sport bike.

BMW then set out to discover what else needed to be done: add comfort to this position and provide a supporting airflow; support the position by moving the pegs downward while still allowing good ground clearance for cornering; reduce effort to maintain the position by moving them forward to change the support vector. This removes the need to place any weight on the handle bars. Do so if you wish, but you'll pay the price in comfort. You'll also find that you make the bike feel dull and unresponsive, when compared to properly distributing your weight about the bike. Properly is appropriate here in light of gaining the performance qualities BMW built into the bike. Perhaps the motorcycle magazines don't find the riding qualities we owners do when they test the K1200RS: they are riding it differently than it was designed to be ridden.

The keynotes to the riding position are:
1. Bend at the hips, not at the waist.
2. Maintain a slight arch to the back, not allowing it to curve.
3. Move the butt aft so the weight is over your feet.
4. Using your thigh muscles to support your weight.

The goal is to distribute all your weight over your butt and feet – not on your hands.

Move fore and aft on the seat to make all those things happen. Except for the hip bend, they are not absolutes, but rather ranges. Move about until you can see all of them are happening to some extent with no weight being placed on the handlebars. Do this when the bike is stationary. Take the time to sit on the parked bike. Practice - one must teach their own body. You’ll notice that all good training is done by abstract exercises, not just running off to the playing field and doing what you heard. Learn to press down with the feet. Then, when riding, check that's what you are actually doing.

You should be able to lift your butt off the seat at a millisecond’s notice: as when knowingly approaching a severe bump in the road. Learn to bend at the hips. Do it both ways, and show yourself that you can operate the body differently. Be willing to touch that gas tank. Some people are incredibly fearful of touching a gas tank -- it's almost laughable. If you fear scratching the tank, get some clear tank protectors. Better to think "the gas tank is my friend." it will be some day when you are six hundred miles into your ride and still two hundred miles from your destination.

Your body is not yet trained to operate that way. Flap your elbows like a chicken to relax your arms occasionally. Prove you have your weight supported, mostly by your feet and butt. Even after 25,000 miles on an RS, I end up leaning onto the bars and need to readjust my position. Many people will need to change the riding position they use for riding on the K1200RS. Because "sit up" is so common in our lives, it can come to seem we are not operating the body, even to just sit. But, sit on a wooden stool for six hours and feel what you encounter.

The mind controls the body in healthy people. Take the time to sit on the stationary bike when you are learning. Flex, tighten, relax, and move about across a small but definite range of positions on the bike. Without moving, flex all your body muscles, in order, from the feet toward the hands and head. Feel what that feels like when you relax each muscle, and are still holding the proper riding position. close your eyes and feel it. Not all the muscles are fully relaxed. You are using some of them. How? How much? Why? Then, when you've done that for all the body's muscles, flex them all, and relax and feel it over all.
Even go so far as to stand back 10 feet and look at yourself if you can. Attempt to maintain that position, within reason, for as long in your ride as you can. When you are tire, stop. get off the bike and bend, stretch, and flex all your muscles. Walk until you feel normal, and then get back on the bike in the proper position. Repeat. You'll find you ride longer and longer, and comfort grows and grows. Eventually, it will seem normal.

If you notice tightness or pain, stop. You are compensating for something that has already become tired. You need to develop the muscles that you tired out. Right then, it will be had to find that muscle. The next time you start riding; do a better job of finding what muscles you really need to use to hold that position. Begin by riding in a relaxed environment so you can pay attention to your muscles. Continue to adjust your weight distribution via the elbow flapping, weight transfer between feet and butt, and neck twisting. I promise that if you are doing this correctly your riding pains will disappear.
Even Master Yoda gets tired during a 14 hour riding day, and sometimes during just a six hour riding day. Build up your thigh muscles. Let them do the work. Even with bad knees and a bad back I can ride this lovely performing machine from sunrise to long past sunset.

Blessings to you all, Dick Frantz so cal]
 

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Thanks for the link, I never made it past the article, I was too wore out!

Looks like they are sitting a lot further forward on the seat than I do, have to try it. The only thing is I'm going to wait for my tank grips to show up. It's just too slippery and I think that will help hold that position.
 

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Discussion Starter #20 (Edited)
Ur um calling admin.................................
How do I change my handle to--------------- LT Davey!

This thing ROCKS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

WAAAAAAAAAAAAHOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO.

Can somebody please e-mail me the oil, FD, tranny, lube changeout directions?
I've got enough miles on "shirley" to do a lube change.
Thanks
-Dave
 
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