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Okay, so I am about to spring for the fuel pump replacement kit from beemerboneyard. But one thing I wonder: The old damper turned to goo. Will the new damper turn to goo too? Or is the new damper revamped? Seems pointless to me to put new goo where the old goo blew. You?
 

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From what I have read it appears that when they get old they turn to goo. But they are twenty years old. It also appears that they turn to goo faster when the bike sits and the gas goes bad. If my bike was running when I got it I think it would still be a good idea to check the damper condition. I would hope that the new ones would not turn to goo very quickly. I am new to this but I'm sure someone with more insight will be by soon with better info.
 

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I've had the original damper in my tank since 1986. It's fine. But the gas never sits for more than a couple of months in the winter, then I use stabilizer. Seems to turn to goo only if neglected, which is a good excuse to burn a tank. "honey, I'll be gone for a while, the gas in my beemer is getting stale so I gotta go on a 4 hour ride"
 

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See I knew someone who knew more about this would be right along. The upside to all this is people let them sit and the damper turns to goo, the pump freezes, bike won't run and then they get rid of them cheap. Opportunity for us.
 

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I never quite understood why rubber parts would wear faster sitting in old gas, versus sitting in new gas. With old gas, some of the volatile compounds evaporate, and the varnish comes out of solution. But the volatile stuff in new gas is more likely to eat plastic/rubber/foam than old gasoline varnish. :dunno:
 

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Rema1000 said:
I never quite understood why rubber parts would wear faster sitting in old gas, versus sitting in new gas. With old gas, some of the volatile compounds evaporate, and the varnish comes out of solution. But the volatile stuff in new gas is more likely to eat plastic/rubber/foam than old gasoline varnish. :dunno:
I think the "Corn Juice" in the American gasoline may cause a lot of deterioration of the rubber pieces. But I have also seen a recommendation somewhere as not to use premium gas for storage due to the higher content of additives/cleaners that could possibly eat tank coatings and rubber. I tend to believe that one, some high octane Chevron gas chewed up the tank coating of my R100GS over a winter storage. :(

Another recommendation I have seen from a well known BMW specialist is to add a fair amount of engine oil to the gasoline when storing a bike, it prevents corrosion and varnishes from forming, but you have to remember to drain and refill with fresh gas when pulling out of storage. I had been using that technique on my own for years, but I always dump any gas that is more than 3 months old into my bush car. :thumb:
 

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I replaced my damper the week after I bought my 85 K100RT. It sat for 7 years in the previous owners garage. After 3 years and 15,000 miles the thing still looks brand new.

Paul Glaves talked at the MOA rally in 2009. He said that when he gets time he will cut some dampers out of cork and solve the problem once and for all. Paul is a very smart guy. He probably realizes that the rubber ones last 15-25 years so those who needed them already replaced them.

I say replace the damper as planned ... like the rest of us did.
 
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