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Statmaster
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Discussion Starter #1
This probably applies to the K1200R/S as well.

When I was in for my 6K service, my mechanic noticed that my shift linkage didn't quite line up in a nice parallelagram (his words). When he test rode it, he said it was shifting like shit. A few turns of the adjustment nuts and a tweak here and there, and now it shifts like a dream. Notch, Notch, Notch on each subsequent shift. Not the Notch, clunk, notch clunk, I had become accustomed to.

Something to have checked next time you are at the dealer.
 

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The Gov
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eljeffe said:
This probably applies to the K1200R/S as well.

When I was in for my 6K service, my mechanic noticed that my shift linkage didn't quite line up in a nice parallelagram (his words). When he test rode it, he said it was shifting like shit. A few turns of the adjustment nuts and a tweak here and there, and now it shifts like a dream. Notch, Notch, Notch on each subsequent shift. Not the Notch, clunk, notch clunk, I had become accustomed to.

Something to have checked next time you are at the dealer.

Hmmmmm. I wonder if I did it right when I readjusted for the lowering kit.

Parallelogram between the lever on the xmission and the lever?
 

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Adjusted mine on my KR and it made a big difference in my shifting, especially in the lower gears. As for the "Parallelogram" theory, for us none mathematical types, you might follow the train of thought of adjusting it to the point where you have to "go get" the shifter. Basically, adjust it to the point where you have to extend your foot down to get under the shifter. That way, when you straighten your foot out to it's natural position, basically 90 degrees, you will be at the top end of the shift. That way your not straining to shift up. It worked for me.
 

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eljeffe said:
This probably applies to the K1200R/S as well.

When I was in for my 6K service, my mechanic noticed that my shift linkage didn't quite line up in a nice parallelagram (his words). When he test rode it, he said it was shifting like shit. A few turns of the adjustment nuts and a tweak here and there, and now it shifts like a dream. Notch, Notch, Notch on each subsequent shift.
Where are these adjustment nuts? My -R shifts quite poorly.
 

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I'll try and get some pictures done tonight if I can but the process is kind of easy. There are two lock nuts, one attached to each of of the shifter linkage, that need to be loosened up. Once you back both nuts off, all you need to do is twist the shifter linkage either clock-wise or counter-clock wise and it will adjust the elevation of the shifter lever itself. One thing to remember is this, the linkage should be equally threaded into both the transmission link and the shifter link. If you find yourself running out of threads on one or the other, go ahead and completely unscrew the linkage. Once you have removed the linkage completely, screw it back in ensuring that both ends are threaded equally. I had to do it mine. Once you adjust the shifter to the desired location, tighten the two lock-nuts up and your done.
 

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I klunk only in the lower 3 gears. Is this the fix for it? The service manager is indicating that it's just the nature of the beast. It would be nice to straighten it out, as the higher 3 gears are very, very sweet. More details on the fix would be appreciated.
 

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Statmaster
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Discussion Starter #10
da56panman said:
I klunk only in the lower 3 gears. Is this the fix for it? The service manager is indicating that it's just the nature of the beast. It would be nice to straighten it out, as the higher 3 gears are very, very sweet. More details on the fix would be appreciated.
Yes, this fixed 1st, 2nd, and 3rd. I especially like the fix because I get a nice positive shift when downshifting into these gears.
 

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Statmaster
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Discussion Starter #11
143LRSD said:
I don't know if this is "THE" fix but it certainly helped for me. I have taken some pictures but I am having hell getting them to upload. If anyone has any idea's, I'm open for suggestions on how to get them posted.
Please email the pictures to me at [email protected]

I am guessing that they are either too big in file size (1 MB), or the picture exceeds our limits for width and height (2048 pixels).
 

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I just adjusted mine downwards and went for a ride. Definitely much improved. Mine is an S by the way. No more clunky shifts. Not quite a 'snick' yet, but for sure, alot better.
 

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Statmaster
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Discussion Starter #13
Jason,

I was able to upload the pics.

Thanks for sharing them.
 

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Thanks for getting them posted for me. One of these day's I'm going to figure out how to do that.
 

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raytracer said:
I just adjusted mine downwards and went for a ride. Definitely much improved. Mine is an S by the way. No more clunky shifts. Not quite a 'snick' yet, but for sure, alot better.
Could you please be more specific? Did you shorten (rubber toe shifter end down) or lengthen (rubber toe shifter end up) the shaft?

Thanks!
 

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Personally, I shortened mine. I adjusted it to the point where I had to flex my foot down to get under the shifter. That way, when you shift up, your foot returns to a natural 90 degree position at the top of the shift.

It took a little time messing with it to find the most comfortable position but it helped me greatly in the lower gears.
 

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I hesitate to be the lone dissenter here. However, I will be.

This is not the "fix" for the clunky gearbox. It may in fact improve your shift but simply due to the fact that you now have a properly adjusted shift lever to your individual style.

There is a lot to be said for a properly adjusted bike. Things such as shift and foot brake levers , clutch and brake levers at the bars, seat height and other items.

The clunk in the gear box is not going away on these bikes. Some are worse than others and they all seem to improve with age and miles.
 

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SKIZIKS said:
Could you please be more specific? Did you shorten (rubber toe shifter end down) or lengthen (rubber toe shifter end up) the shaft?

Thanks!

I adjusted mine so that the rubber toe shifter end was moved down towards the ground. to the point where the shifter is below the peg and is moved up even with the peg during the shift.
 

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xlr8r said:
I hesitate to be the lone dissenter here. However, I will be.

This is not the "fix" for the clunky gearbox. It may in fact improve your shift but simply due to the fact that you now have a properly adjusted shift lever to your individual style.

There is a lot to be said for a properly adjusted bike. Things such as shift and foot brake levers , clutch and brake levers at the bars, seat height and other items.

The clunk in the gear box is not going away on these bikes. Some are worse than others and they all seem to improve with age and miles.
So are you dissenting saying you tried the adjustment and it made no difference on yours? I'm not sure why a simple gear shifter adjustment would make the clunk go away, and like I said, it's still not as quiet and smooth as some bikes I have ridden, but it definitely is 100% better than it was - to the point where I consider it gone, fixed!
 

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I'm saying that the original post in this thread stated that this adjustment will fix the clunky gearbox so I posted to say it's impossible to eliminate the clunk with these adjustments. In fact, this gearbox is the worst I've ever experience and I've owned a lot of different bikes.

Based on a few of the responses, it also sounded like many new owners simply ride off on their new toy and never make any adjustment to the controls.

I think our dealers should be taking the time at delivery to make sure each bike is fitted to each customer as much as possible. Nevertheless, once you get it home you should make sure this stuff is set up correctly.

I do agree that a properly set up bike wil make a huge difference in your ride but it won't fix the clunk.
 
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