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Some of bikes I have bought like a HD street glide vs Road glide thing… in the lnostalgic and looks department wanted a Street Glide but after test rides in 2009 and 2018 hands down the Road Glide was a much better bike ( chassis minted fairing ). The biggest reason so bought with function over looks.
I agree on the K 1200 S. I wanted one just thought it looked amazing, ten years later I bought one and it’s just one of those bikes with soul and character. It is a bit raw in some areas ( clutch ) and has a couple design flaws like the fuel sensor but I won’t give up on it……I have 8 bikes and I find myself sitting in my Man Cave just in ahw Over how beautiful she is. She is a looker people are always complimenting me on her.
The Hayabusa and ZX14 do nothing for me. Whether they’re faster or not doesn’t matter. They don’t talk to me. I have to be connected to that particular bike something down deep in me that I can’t really put into words. Lots of you know what I’m talking about
But I have a 1050 Tiger crappy suspension and Brakes to start with and looks like a pray-mantis in front but I love it the looks and the triple especially Most might disagree.
Love the color schemes on both your K12 and K16. You have excellent taste 👌.
 

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Hey Phantom. How come you have no brakes when you leave a downhill drive😲
You tell me.
1) I don't Always or Usually have no brakes but it's happened far too often to feel safe. I feel as if i'm in A Space Odessy with the computer sayingz "I can't do that Dave."
I have to wait an unbearable length of time before starting out and don't know when that is. When I finally do leave my mind set is "hope I waited long enough and will the brakes work now?
The road ahead should be the focus. When stopped to read a map or get my bearings is the worst time but often that time it happens
This bike is so fucking weirid and different for no positive reason. After 1 year I've just now realized the brakes do work going down hill backwards even when the power is off.
I was taught at an early age to drive forward and backward as a last resort.

2) At 72 years old I'm still athletic enough to teach Tennis professionally and haven't lost a moto street race in 30 - 40 years including against K1200S and Hayabusa.
Change is harder than learning the first time. I did teach an old dog new tricks. My program says: "When we are wrong we romptly admit it."
That being said 1 year is far to long to re learn anything. I ride a bike because it's quicker. Why do I I have to sit and wait. I feel so stupid just sitting there when always wanted a LeMans type of start where everyone raced on foot to their car to begin the race.

3) The shift pattern once was up down for English or Harleys and down up for Japanese bikes. I crashed a Norton I punched out to 750cc and added dual disc brakes . When adrenalin takes over so do my instincts. When I caught up with a Z1. For 50 years every bike I've owned ishas been essentially a cafe racer. (standard modified to road race).
I'm smart enough to score 98% on DMV tests but like in top gun "you donm't have time to thinkl" Canyon Racing is a lot safer than riding a bike on Los Angeles streets.
Why is the BMW horn button on top when for 50 years its been below? I know where it is and can't find it when I see I'm about to b e cut off even after 13 moths with this bike. My life is in jepardy because of this BMW stupidity.
BMW recognizes their stupidity because every 2021 bike I looked at has a normal turn signal horn levert / button. Like microsoft forcing you to by Windows 11 BMW says buy a K1300
 

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my recollection from research a few years back was that the Hayabusa had a higher top end speed than the BMW K1200, but that the BMW was faster from 0 to 70 off the line. I have ridden both and I loved my BMW K 1200 RS more than any bike I’ve ever been on.

I didn’t want to title this “Hayabusa vs K1200S”, because as much as happily as the comparison is made, they are NOT the same bike.

That being said, I just rode a Hayabusa. I don’t know what to say. I can’t form an opinion of i. The engine revs really really fast, and has a carefree effortlessness to it. In certain ways is a lot smoother than the K1200S, but there is a constant vibration that’s transferred to the rider. Mine has a vibration due to some bearing in the clutch assembly, but outside of a specific rev range it transfers nothing. The Hayabusa sits way lower. I didn’t get the phrase “purpose built machine” until I sat on it. The wheelbase compared to the height is very very long.

But the power. On a rolling start from 70ish, the Hayabusa had maybe a bike length and a half on me, and that was basically it. I’m flabbergasted. This K1200S, NOT a purpose built machine, with a 10% power sucking differential, and the Hayabusa barely edged out. If the K were chain driven, I’m convinced it would be neck and neck.

But the power on the ‘Busa is different than the K1200S. I can’t put my finger on it. Less torquey, more power. But it does pull in all gears. It sets off with less occasion, but the stock hayabusa I rode also is the quietest bike I’ve ever ridden. The K1200S has a lot of intake noise, the Hayabusa has basically none. It’s silent. Different bikes.

Especially when it comes to handling. The hayabusa handles like dogshit. There is no compare. I’m not sure if the Hayabusa might be faster around corners, it’s low. It requires less lean to turn, but where the Hayabusa maneuvers like a jet ski, the K1200S dances like a fairy.

I get the appeal of the Hayabusa, but I would never trade it for my K1200S. When the guy I switched bikes with rode mine, the first words after we stopped were “That’s the best bike I’ve ever ridden”. I guess that sort of sums it up.
 

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ZX (was Busa).
Can't really comment on the Busa. When I was looking for a new bike back in 2002 to replace my R11GS, I sat on the Busa but the knee bend was just too aggressive for my legs (6'2). I did compare the K12RS, and eventually ended up with a 2002 (refresh) ZX12R, which was the bike usually cross-shopped with the Busa.

Just no comparison with the 12RS.
A few years later I took a test ride on a K12S. My impression was that it felt like a big VFR800 (which I also owned at the time).

I fitted ZX12 with a 2" rise bar, and aftermarket screen for better airflow and protection, as well as a Ventura rack system with 50 litre front and 30 litre rear bags for touring.

The shop guy rode the ZX to lead the way. The biggest disappointment for me on the K12S was the handling, especially throttling off into corners, where the front end felt loose and slow (hard to describe). In all other situations, the bike generally felt heavier than the ZX.
The sales guy's comment was that the ZX felt like it had substantially more go.
Test comparisons between the Busa and the ZX of the day usually mentioned that the ZX handled more like a big sport bike than the Busa.

You can't really compare roll-on top gear between the K12S and the Busa / ZX. The latter two bikes are geared for 300 km/h top speeds. Same with my old K100RS back in the 80s: roll on in top gear against stuff like the FJ11 usually had the K100 doing very well up to 100mph or so, but the K hit a hard limit at around 150 mph, where the FJs and Ninjas of the time were geared taller.

The ZX treated me very well. Zero issues over 25K miles other than chain and battery: far, far better than the R11GS I sold to get it. Just very heavy on fuel. Riding in my 50s, it was sufficiently comfortable for a 6K mile tour up into eastern Canada, and much less tiring than a heavier sport tourer in a long day of twisties.

Hard luggage not an option, but OTOH, the Ventura rack system with 80l of luggage was rock solid stable even in the rain at 150 mph, as the bags fit directly behind the rider.
 

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I didn’t want to title this “Hayabusa vs K1200S”, because as much as happily as the comparison is made, they are NOT the same bike.

That being said, I just rode a Hayabusa. I don’t know what to say. I can’t form an opinion of i. The engine revs really really fast, and has a carefree effortlessness to it. In certain ways is a lot smoother than the K1200S, but there is a constant vibration that’s transferred to the rider. Mine has a vibration due to some bearing in the clutch assembly, but outside of a specific rev range it transfers nothing. The Hayabusa sits way lower. I didn’t get the phrase “purpose built machine” until I sat on it. The wheelbase compared to the height is very very long.

But the power. On a rolling start from 70ish, the Hayabusa had maybe a bike length and a half on me, and that was basically it. I’m flabbergasted. This K1200S, NOT a purpose built machine, with a 10% power sucking differential, and the Hayabusa barely edged out. If the K were chain driven, I’m convinced it would be neck and neck.

But the power on the ‘Busa is different than the K1200S. I can’t put my finger on it. Less torquey, more power. But it does pull in all gears. It sets off with less occasion, but the stock hayabusa I rode also is the quietest bike I’ve ever ridden. The K1200S has a lot of intake noise, the Hayabusa has basically none. It’s silent. Different bikes.

Especially when it comes to handling. The hayabusa handles like dogshit. There is no compare. I’m not sure if the Hayabusa might be faster around corners, it’s low. It requires less lean to turn, but where the Hayabusa maneuvers like a jet ski, the K1200S dances like a fairy.

I get the appeal of the Hayabusa, but I would never trade it for my K1200S. When the guy I switched bikes with rode mine, the first words after we stopped were “That’s the best bike I’ve ever ridden”. I guess that sort of sums it up.

I'm sorry: There is not, nor will there ever be a bike that hold a candle to our K1200S's.
 

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Have to jump in here about the handling of the K1200s, handling is subject to rider imputs, you put in the wrong imput and your handling will suffer, your in a stiff upright body position for a fast corner your handling will suffer! You get your entry speed wrong and afraid to trail brake your handling will suffer!
Ok now that’s out of the way, I’ve been riding a K1200s since the first year production in 05 and I can tell you that I trust the suspension and the bike in fast corners, most riders are afraid to push a 550 pound bike and lean it to the edge of tires, well I’m here to say I’ve been doing just that and the bike likes it, use the weight of the bike and your body position to your advantage, the k1200s will haul ass in the canyons, tight fast curves and have plenty of grip at its maximum lean angle, it trail brakes well and very stable and predictable. Anyone who thinks the k1200s can’t handle the curves because of its front suspension setup is just doing it wrong period. I’m speaking from experience and fine tuning it’s capabilities.
Sorry Gents but if you can’t take fast corners with ease on a k1200s than you need better skills and training, so many reviews by owners that are average riders at best isn’t a accurate assesment of the bike period.
 

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I’ve purchased 48 motorcycles some of those off road. In my 40 years of riding. The K 1200 S To me is one of the best handling bikes I’ve ever been on it’s almost like cheating it does not feel like a 550 pound motorcycle it’s the only bike I’ve ever had that you can drag the brake and it not stand up in a corner. If you’re comfortable with the tires you’ve selected she will rail Canyon Roads like nobody’s business. I’m hoping I don’t take too much away from that with My Wunderlich bar conversion.
 

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I did a comparison of the “rider triangles” of the K bikes vs the Hayabusa at cycle-ergo dot com and the subjective impressions people have are borne-out: the the knee and hip angles are more closed and there’s more forward torso lean on the Hayabusa than the K’s, and not by a small margin.

As to the handling of the K (I can’t speak to the Hayabusa) this bike really rewards keeping your hands light on the bars. I “cue” this in my mind by saying “soft elbows” or just “elbows” to myself when trying to explore the edges of the tires. Doing this unweights my hands and leaves the front end to do its thing. Granted, the bike is happier if you accurately set the correct trajectory to hit the line you need the first time, and a bit less than happy to correct lines mid-corner than a pure sportbike. But, I’ve found the “weird” front end becomes very communicative and compliant IF you let it flow and don’t fight it with stiff arms.

Additionally, the thing does trail brake like a boss. Grip the slick tank with your thighs, lighten your hands and enjoy the lack of fore/aft pitching. I’m debating an AF-Xied device to smooth out the transition from trailing throttle to closed throttle to cracking it back open - it’s too lean, has too much engine braking and requires too many brain bytes to return to positive throttle smoothly. Reports and reviews on the AF-Xied device are welcome.

Finally, the bike really likes a bit of hang-off from the rider. I’m definitely not talking about trying to go all Marc Marquez and seeing how close you can get your head to the front axle. Just one butt cheek off the edge of the seat and your chin towards the mirror or just over your hand is more than enough to switch the bike into “Oh, okay... we’re turning it up a bit, are we? Okay” Mode.
 

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Discussion Starter · #31 · (Edited)
I did a comparison of the “rider triangles” of the K bikes vs the Hayabusa at cycle-ergo dot com and the subjective impressions people have are borne-out: the the knee and hip angles are more closed and there’s more forward torso lean on the Hayabusa than the K’s, and not by a small margin.

As to the handling of the K (I can’t speak to the Hayabusa) this bike really rewards keeping your hands light on the bars. I “cue” this in my mind by saying “soft elbows” or just “elbows” to myself when trying to explore the edges of the tires. Doing this unweights my hands and leaves the front end to do its thing. Granted, the bike is happier if you accurately set the correct trajectory to hit the line you need the first time, and a bit less than happy to correct lines mid-corner than a pure sportbike. But, I’ve found the “weird” front end becomes very communicative and compliant IF you let it flow and don’t fight it with stiff arms.

Additionally, the thing does trail brake like a boss. Grip the slick tank with your thighs, lighten your hands and enjoy the lack of fore/aft pitching. I’m debating an AF-Xied device to smooth out the transition from trailing throttle to closed throttle to cracking it back open - it’s too lean, has too much engine braking and requires too many brain bytes to return to positive throttle smoothly. Reports and reviews on the AF-Xied device are welcome.

Finally, the bike really likes a bit of hang-off from the rider. I’m definitely not talking about trying to go all Marc Marquez and seeing how close you can get your head to the front axle. Just one butt cheek off the edge of the seat and your chin towards the mirror or just over your hand is more than enough to switch the bike into “Oh, okay... we’re turning it up a bit, are we? Okay” Mode.
I don’t know who you are, I don’t know how you ride.

This post is the single most useful piece of information I have ever read about the K1200S. I unloaded the bars and let the front do its thing. Never have I ever felt the bike click so hard. I feel like Harry Potter when he finds out he’s a wizard. It. Makes. Sense. It’s clicked. I’ve been speechless for the past half hour and only just regained my ability to speak. The two fairing holders on the left and right side, that’s where your knee goes. I’ve never ridden so fast ever. I did almost low-side, but without any sort of stress (I promise I’m not a lunatic). I’ve easily gained 10mph on corners. It’s clicked. There’s an effortlessness that wasn’t there before. Even my tires seem less stressed.

Knees go here:

Hood Automotive lighting Automotive tire Automotive design Motor vehicle

Hood Automotive tire Automotive lighting Motor vehicle Automotive exterior


Holy shit. HOLY SHIT.
 
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Have to jump in here about the handling of the K1200s, handling is subject to rider imputs, you put in the wrong imput and your handling will suffer, your in a stiff upright body position for a fast corner your handling will suffer! You get your entry speed wrong and afraid to trail brake your handling will suffer!
Ok now that’s out of the way, I’ve been riding a K1200s since the first year production in 05 and I can tell you that I trust the suspension and the bike in fast corners, most riders are afraid to push a 550 pound bike and lean it to the edge of tires, well I’m here to say I’ve been doing just that and the bike likes it, use the weight of the bike and your body position to your advantage, the k1200s will haul ass in the canyons, tight fast curves and have plenty of grip at its maximum lean angle, it trail brakes well and very stable and predictable. Anyone who thinks the k1200s can’t handle the curves because of its front suspension setup is just doing it wrong period. I’m speaking from experience and fine tuning it’s capabilities.
Sorry Gents but if you can’t take fast corners with ease on a k1200s than you need better skills and training, so many reviews by owners that are average riders at best isn’t a accurate assesment of the bike period.
As long as the tires are properly inflated, this bike is like a ballerina. But if my front tire is down on pressure by 1.5 pounds, it acts like I am hauling bricks. As a result I know right away. I air 'em up, and my ballerina is back! And like you said, she can handle the corners at high, high speeds. I agree completely with your assessment.
 

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Discussion Starter · #33 ·
As long as the tires are properly inflated, this bike is like a ballerina. But if my front tire is down on pressure by 1.5 pounds, it acts like I am hauling bricks. As a result I know right away. I air 'em up, and my ballerina is back! And like you said, she can handle the corners at high, high speeds. I agree completely with your assessment.
What pressure do you run? I run 36/42
 

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I agree with the tyre pressure has on handling. I run 36 rear 34 front. Lose a couple of psi and it’s like riding on wet sand. Taking your weight off the bars on less than ideal surfaces lets the suspension do its thing and also gives more feeling to handling inputs.
 

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During a recent day of repeated assaults on The Tail of the Dragon on the TN/NC border, I desperately wanted to drop my tire pressures to get more temp in the tires, but was thwarted by the ludicrous logic of the TPMS system. A) I don’t give a crap what my tire pressure “would be” if it was 68* out, and; B ) just tell me what the dang pressure is in the tire, and; C) don’t make me ignore a TPMS warning light that means jack squat to me.
 

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I am constantly keeping them at 40 Psi are you Suggesting that’s too high in the front I can understand it for winter riding since the roads aren’t heated as much just curious try to keep all the bikes about the same
 
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