BMW K1200, K1300, and K1600 Forum banner

1 - 20 of 24 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
106 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
The poor engineering for the headlight ground on my 03K1200GT bit me in the ass last night, so today I removed the headlight assembly to see just how bad it was.

The ground wire coming from the external plug has been spliced in the past, apparently with a fresh piece of the same inadequate size wire and a new female connector which is obviously for a larger wire and terminal. Apparently whoever repaired it before, hoped the larger connector would resist overheating better. What they didn't plan on was, it loosened up and allowed surface corrosion to interfere with current flow and cause another heat related early failure.

With my background in electrical/electronic repair, fixing it right should be fairly easy, except for one thing. The idiot glued the damn lens on the assembly, so for now I just squeezed the larger female connector down to give it a really tight grip on the ground strip and cleaned up the ground strip terminals, then swapped the common ground wire to the easier-to-reach terminal, so I could reclean it from time to time, more conveniently.

I despise working on something someone else has already screwed up.

So now I'm considering solutions that allow me to retain the wiring and connections already inside the assembly. Obviously reducing the total current flow would help the situation considerably.

option 1) Stop using the high beam during daylight riding. This may be enough to prevent future failures, as long as I clean the ground strip terminals and squeeze the oversized connector back down again a couple times a year.

option 2) Add a 12V relay to shut off the low beam, whenever the high beam is turned on. This would probably be just fine for using the high beam during the day, but without the low beam to provide a wider light, riding in the country at night with just the high beam on may not be adequate.

option 3) Add a switch instead of a relay, to the low beam circuit. Then I could still have the low beam for lighting width at night in the country, even when using the high beam. This would again leave me cleaning the terminals and squeezing the oversized connector from time to time and just hoping it would be enough to keep it working.

option 4) Replace both the 55W bulbs with 35W HIDs. Reducing total current by more than 3 amps would seem to be a good idea, as long as the ballasts could be mounted outside the headlight assembly and utilise the wiring inside the assembly, just as it is. Does anyone know what voltage the HID bulbs actually operate on?

option 5) Use option 1 until I can take the time and trouble to cut the lens free, then rewire the assembly to a more reliable design. This does not preclude the subsequent use of option 4, although it will give me the opportunity to install the ballasts inside the headlight assembly, if that is the normal location for them.

...anything I overlooked? ...comments?

regards,
Joe
 

·
Looking for better limits...
Joined
·
5,163 Posts
Leave the high-beam as-is. HID and flashing don't mix. Takes the bulb too long to get to a decent brightness for that. 35w HID for the low beam would help reduce the ground-side current. Instead of crimping, see if you can't solder the ground wire to the connector. More expensive, better connector.
Running a relay controlled by the beam switch and then using a larger wire gauge, say from the battery to the line side of the relay, then the same wire gauge from the load side of the relay to the bulb connector will make is slightly messier to change the bulb (if you don't go the HID route) but will give you better light on both low and high beam bulbs because the larger wire gauge doesn't have the voltage drop the existing wire does. Maybe ½ volt, but it makes a difference with both brilliance and bulb life.

I installed a 55w HID low-beam on the bike. Since I had to cut a hole in the back cover to run the wires from the ballast to the bulb, I added a ground wire so now each beam has it's own ground wire. Haven't had to run anywhere yet where I can use the high beam for any distance, though.



100% free webcam site! | Awesome chicks and it is absolutely free! | Watch free live sex cam - easy as 1-2-3
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,791 Posts
I don't think you can take the lens apart from the housing, factory glued by BMW.... :( well maybe with a Dremel. I looked at mine and that's the way I figured it is built, nothing in there had been touched by anyone else than the assembly line.... :( And BTW that is a very expensive headlight, you might want some sort of rock protection over it. :D

I've already done your option 3, switch for the low beam, but mostly to conserve the battery in case it weakens out, I learned that lesson on my GS.....and the little parking bulb stays on all the time and is enough to probably fool the cops if you live in an area with the "Headlight On Always" law. :D And probably easy also to find a brighter parking bulb to do that(Fool them...)

HID is the way to go, from other posts I have seen,the 35W is plenty of light, I'm ordering some for my bike and my car, too much wildlife at night up here!

Do you also get this dimming of the headlight when you hit the brakes at night....it is so annoying, and distracting.....also caused by wimpy wiring. My K100RS did that a bit but way worse on the K1200RS. I was thinking to go straight to the battery with a relay just to alleviate that and insure a more constant voltage to the HID ballast.

I've already added an extra ground to the headlight, but did not do it right, sent it to the frame, should have brought a large wire from the battery and install a proper ground post in the front somewhere where I can ground any extra equipment I may buy. There has been other posts where the headlight grounds failed, good thing you are looking at them.... :clap:
 

·
Addict
Joined
·
3,750 Posts
The most common issue on motorcycles and cars is skimpy wiring which causes voltage drops on the high load circuits like headlamps, horn, rear stop and tail. That's why you get the light dimming and once they wrap the wire in the loom, you have to consider adding a decent 12 gauge wire externally. BMW must use a computer to design their looms for minimum copper content because they have so many connection points, some inside the loom where you can't get to them.

I read a write up once where a guy was complaining about his poor headlights. With the motor running he measured the normal about 14.4 volts across the battery but 12.7 volts across the headlight lamp. With both lamps lit he was losing something like 15 watts just in the wire. Of course his headlamp bulbs lasted forever because a 12% reduction in lamp voltage is a lot less light.

The best option not in the list is to run a separate ground in 12 gauge from the battery negative up to the cockpit, tie the existing brown headlamp ground across to it and use that connection point for the headlamps. If you go HID a relay isn't needed, but it helps with the handlebar switch life if you want to do it. That halves voltage drop on the oem wiring and would be adequate for HID. If you want to go the next step, partiucularly with bigger tungsten headlight bulbs, that involves adding a 'must have' relay, looking at the hot wire route and beefing that up. But HID's is the way to go. Whatever you do, don't start making 'ground' connections to the bikes metalwork. In places up front, the electrical conduction on anything but the clutch housing is unreliable, some metalwork is painted and things can stop working when bike frame parts are removed.

When you buy the aftermarket so called 'brighter' lamps, they just assume there are these kind of wiring losses and de-rate their lamp voltage so they overrun by up to 10% and of course don't last very long. Even less life if you thicken up the wiring.



Never pay again for live sex! | Hot girls doing naughty stuff for free! | Chat for free!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
106 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Never having played around with HID, I hadn't considered the startup characteristics. Thanks for pointing that out.

Unless the joint will be subjected to excessive heat, soldering is always my preferred method, but most professionals are far less skilled at soldering than I am. Crimping a connector is okay for signal wires, but not any connection that has to carry more than 1 or 2 amps. A swaged connection is just as good as a properly soldered connection and is much easier to get right, for people who have no training in high reliability soldering techniques.

regards,
Joe

Razel said:
Leave the high-beam as-is. HID and flashing don't mix. Takes the bulb too long to get to a decent brightness for that. 35w HID for the low beam would help reduce the ground-side current. Instead of crimping, see if you can't solder the ground wire to the connector. More expensive, better connector.
Running a relay controlled by the beam switch and then using a larger wire gauge, say from the battery to the line side of the relay, then the same wire gauge from the load side of the relay to the bulb connector will make is slightly messier to change the bulb (if you don't go the HID route) but will give you better light on both low and high beam bulbs because the larger wire gauge doesn't have the voltage drop the existing wire does. Maybe ½ volt, but it makes a difference with both brilliance and bulb life.

I installed a 55w HID low-beam on the bike. Since I had to cut a hole in the back cover to run the wires from the ballast to the bulb, I added a ground wire so now each beam has it's own ground wire. Haven't had to run anywhere yet where I can use the high beam for any distance, though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
106 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
There appeared to be a thin rubber gasket, with some kind of sealing compound (permatex, RTV... whatever) that had also been added. I expect a hot knife will work just fine to cut it free without doing the kind of damage a dremel bit would do.

You know, in 45 years of driving and riding, I've never had a headlight broken on any kind of vehicle. Not even on the street legal dirt bike I abandoned wrapped around a tree back in the 70's :)

The dimming of the headlight when using the brakes, is something that I only see if I use the front brake. The BOOST/ABS is malfunctioning on this bike anytime I use the front brake and the extra load from that over-active system does cause a noticable voltage drop. It doesn't happen when I just use the rear brake. However, I did notice the first time I rode this bike, when I used the kill switch to shut off the engine while the ignition was still on, the obvious dimming of the headlight clearly indicated an electrical problem. I was just hoping it would keep working long enough for me to get the ABS problem solved first.

regards,
Joe

h96669 said:
I don't think you can take the lens apart from the housing, factory glued by BMW.... :( well maybe with a Dremel. I looked at mine and that's the way I figured it is built, nothing in there had been touched by anyone else than the assembly line.... :( And BTW that is a very expensive headlight, you might want some sort of rock protection over it. :D

I've already done your option 3, switch for the low beam, but mostly to conserve the battery in case it weakens out, I learned that lesson on my GS.....and the little parking bulb stays on all the time and is enough to probably fool the cops if you live in an area with the "Headlight On Always" law. :D And probably easy also to find a brighter parking bulb to do that(Fool them...)

HID is the way to go, from other posts I have seen,the 35W is plenty of light, I'm ordering some for my bike and my car, too much wildlife at night up here!

Do you also get this dimming of the headlight when you hit the brakes at night....it is so annoying, and distracting.....also caused by wimpy wiring. My K100RS did that a bit but way worse on the K1200RS. I was thinking to go straight to the battery with a relay just to alleviate that and insure a more constant voltage to the HID ballast.

I've already added an extra ground to the headlight, but did not do it right, sent it to the frame, should have brought a large wire from the battery and install a proper ground post in the front somewhere where I can ground any extra equipment I may buy. There has been other posts where the headlight grounds failed, good thing you are looking at them.... :clap:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
106 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
This problem is not limited to vehicles. I've had to rewire low voltage power systems on ships and at remote locations such as navigation beacons and communication relays also. It's pretty common with all commercially produced low voltage power system wiring. In my experience, most battery power systems and backup power systems are inadequately wired for long term reliability.

Your example of 14.4 volts being dropped to 12.7 volts, is actually fairly typical and is perfectly acceptable to most manufacturers. The problem is, they don't bother to take into account the characteristics of bulb filaments when the charging system is overloaded or shut down. Bulb filaments are rated by wattage because they operate at such a high temperature that they draw reduced current when operating normally. A lower voltage will actually cause the current to increase. In your example, if the engine is idling, providing reduced charging current so that the electrical load exceeds the voltage regulator's output current, the battery terminals will drop to 12.6 volts. That results in the headlight voltage dropping to 10.9 volts, causing the two 55 watt bulbs to try to draw a total of 10.1 amps instead of the expected 8.7 amps. Typically, bulbs designed for 12.6 volts will draw increased current all the way down to 10 volts, before starting to draw less current. That means the headlight ground wiring has to be able to handle at least 11 amps for a pair of 55 watt bulbs. While fire prevention tables call for 346 circular mils per amp (AWG16), for wiring exposed to weather and vibration AWG14 would provide better long term reliability.

Installation of HID adds another design factor. While bulb filaments just draw more current with slight voltage reductions, electronic circuits are much more unstable and can stop working or even be destroyed by voltage drops that bulbs can handle. The addition of an electronic module (ballast) requires that the wiring be upgraded to allow less voltage drop as the bulb curent increases. Most designs consider that a 1 volt total drop in the wiring is acceptable, with half that being dropped in the connectors and the wire size being calculated to drop the other .5 volts. Personally, I have found that increasing the wiring size to allow only .25 volts being dropped in the wire at peak load, gives much better long term results. Assuming that we are still specifying two 55 watt bulbs, with one of them being HID, and half of the wire voltage drop is in the positive wires and the other half, .125 volts, is in the ground wire, the common ground wire would need to have less than .011 ohms of resistance. This specifies a minimum wire size of AWG14 for a ground wire up to 4 feet in length and AWG12 for a ground wire longer than 4 feet but less than 6.5 feet long. Of course, this does not include any calculations for inrush current that the ballast may require, since I don't know what that current may be.

regards,
Joe

voxmagna said:
The most common issue on motorcycles and cars is skimpy wiring which causes voltage drops on the high load circuits like headlamps, horn, rear stop and tail. That's why you get the light dimming and once they wrap the wire in the loom, you have to consider adding a decent 12 gauge wire externally. BMW must use a computer to design their looms for minimum copper content because they have so many connection points, some inside the loom where you can't get to them.

I read a write up once where a guy was complaining about his poor headlights. With the motor running he measured the normal about 14.4 volts across the battery but 12.7 volts across the headlight lamp. With both lamps lit he was losing something like 15 watts just in the wire. Of course his headlamp bulbs lasted forever because a 12% reduction in lamp voltage is a lot less light.

The best option not in the list is to run a separate ground in 12 gauge from the battery negative up to the cockpit, tie the existing brown headlamp ground across to it and use that connection point for the headlamps. If you go HID a relay isn't needed, but it helps with the handlebar switch life if you want to do it. That halves voltage drop on the oem wiring and would be adequate for HID. If you want to go the next step, partiucularly with bigger tungsten headlight bulbs, that involves adding a 'must have' relay, looking at the hot wire route and beefing that up. But HID's is the way to go. Whatever you do, don't start making 'ground' connections to the bikes metalwork. In places up front, the electrical conduction on anything but the clutch housing is unreliable, some metalwork is painted and things can stop working when bike frame parts are removed.

When you buy the aftermarket so called 'brighter' lamps, they just assume there are these kind of wiring losses and de-rate their lamp voltage so they overrun by up to 10% and of course don't last very long. Even less life if you thicken up the wiring.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,791 Posts
sloowpoke said:
This problem is not limited to vehicles. I've had to rewire low voltage power systems on ships and at remote locations such as navigation beacons and communication relays also. It's pretty common with all commercially produced low voltage power system wiring. In my experience, most battery power systems and backup power systems are inadequately wired for long term reliability.

Wanna come with us....we are heading up north to do beacons with a ship full of electrical problems......! :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
106 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
While I do appreciate the offer of gainful employment in a field I am well experienced at, coupled with the joy of working on a ship that isn't dry, no thank you.

I like my landings to include lots of warm sunshine, tropical breezes and fresh coconuts. Failing in that, I require to take my bike aboard and be able to offload it to go for a ride occasionally and I know from experience that that won't happen, going north from BC this time of year.

regards,
Joe
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
106 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
I was thinking about the high beam socket and the spring clip/ground buss that holds it in place. That part is far too thin and springy to be copper, so it's probably copper clad steel. That would mean it also has more resistance than a copper buss. Cutting away metal to form the terminals that the ground wires connect to, means even higher resistance at the terminals. That would seem to be the probable reason that the common ground wire terminal is getting so hot. The wire itself is not getting hot on my bike, but the terminal is getting hot, melting into the plastic reflector and transferring heat through conduction, to the wire.

A little more thought has triggered some old memories.

When I was in Europe, back in the 70's, I couldn't help but notice that headlight in European cities is quite a bit different than American headlight use. The European low beam headlights were much dimmer than what I was used to. I seem to recall that they were 20 Watts or or less. Is it still that way today? If so, that steel clip should have been replaced with a part designed to handle higher headlight currents than are on the European market bikes. Is that the same part, regardless of which market the bikes are made for?

I'll have to look at that closer the next time I have it apart. It may be that the problem can be solved by simply taking that part out of the path of current flow.

regards,
Joe
 

·
Addict
Joined
·
3,750 Posts
In UK the H4 dual filament bulb was ubiquitous in the 90's. That's a 60w main, 55 watt low dip. Since then lamp units and reflectors seem better made and the German cars with similar tungsten wattage appear to have the brighter lights. I can't remember the roll out of tungsten halogen, but pehaps you were earlier which made your lights look brighter. Then there was that terribly French idea of yellow headlights.

HID ballasts take a lot more current as voltage reduces because their circuits aim to give constant light output, unlike halogen filament lamp behaviour. Starting currents for a 35 watt HID at 9.5 volts can be over 20 Amp. But then it's only for a second or so. Manufacturers don't recommend HIDs run below 9.5 volts. That's about the voltage you can get with a dying battery during cranking. If you leave your lights switched to low beam always 'on' like I do, the oem loadshare relay is pretty poor. It still keeps the HIDs off during cranking, but can result in more on/off HID firing cycles before and after starting when the battery is recovering and the bike may be at idle.

You can either re-think the oem loadshare concept like I did, or take precautions: Keep the battery fully charged / tendered 24/7 and replace it sooner rather than later. Turn HIDs off before starting. Use relays to reduce voltage drops from oem wiring and through switches.

I like the idea of even thicker 16 gauge wire, but if you take it right into the cockpit instrument area and there are two of them, the lights would be great but the bike wouldn't steer so well!

We started with 6 volt vehicle lighting and extensive use of chassis as a ground return which was responsible for poor unreliable electrics and accelerated corrosion in some vehicles. Then they moved to 12 volt. But the best system standard is 24 volts used on HGV semis. Of course they have long wiring runs for their trailers. In my ignorance I thought ships would have the same problem, which is why some ran with 48 volt d.c power systems.



Never pay again for live sex! | Hot girls doing naughty stuff for free! | Chat for free!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
106 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
>I like the idea of even thicker 16 gauge wire...

The smaller the gauge number, the larger the wire is. AWG 16 is the smallest wire that would not pose a fire hazard at 11 amps. That doesn't mean it won't still give an excessive voltage drop if the battery is low.

>Starting currents for a 35 watt HID at 9.5 volts can be over 20 Amp.
>But then it's only for a second or so.

That must be for an extremely short spike. A full second at 20 amps would certainly blow a standard 7.5 amp fuse. Did you install a slow blow or higher amperage fuse? ...and are you talking about a 55W or a 35W HID?

regards,
Joe
 

·
Addict
Joined
·
3,750 Posts
Fuses are usually rated at 5 X their rated current to blow. At their rated current they can sit their happy for 30 minutes or more and stay good.

That 20 amps is only at 9.5 volts for a 35 watt HID. I wanted a fuse value which would be both reliable for the short term start and yet blow if there was a serious fault. I know my ballasts have overcurrent and all sorts of other fault monitoring, but they were supposed to be for oem specs. Others you get from China may have less protection. The worst case peak start current occurs when the HID lamp is cold. Once it's got warm an on/off restart cycle is less current demanding and faster to light up. Some lamps and ballasts may be slower and these are to be avoided if you are putting HID in as a High beam and dipping. For the 55W HID I'd start with a 10 amp fuse and if that blows, move up in standard values one at a time.

I fitted 10 amp quick blow blade fuses in the lines to each ballast. Before I modified the loadshare I did start the Hids when cranking and the fuses didn't blow. A battery getting as low as 9.5 volt during cranking is in a pretty sad state. Slow blow fuses tend to be in glass envelopes. I stuck with auto blade fuses so they were compatible with the rest of the bike and could be got easily out on the road. I've never had a 10 amp fuse blow on any 35 watt HID and I run 4.



Never pay again for live sex! | Hot girls doing naughty stuff for free! | Chat for free!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
60 Posts
but most professionals are far less skilled at soldering than I am
I wish you were my neighbor !
You'd be fed and served in my home (which isn't dry :) ) so I could ask you to solder my r/c model and motorcycle related soldering jobs.
I love working on bikes, model planes, heli's, etc., but have just never been more than a mediocre solderer.
My 04 GT did the same thing. I took it to a gifted mechanic who loves electrical chaos and he replaced the ground wire with what he described as "better wire, grounded better" and I've had not a problem since, been running the PIAA bulbs recommended here shortly after I bought the bike. Doug
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
135 Posts
HID Fusing

Ok Lets do some simple dc electronic math.

DC current equals DC watts divided by DC volts.

Keeping this simple and assuming that a bike battery is 12 volts DC

The DC current of a 55w lamp is 4.58 amps at 12 volts DC

Assuming that a fuse should have a steady state load of no greater that 85% of the fuse value, the fuse for a 55w lamp would be 5.39 amps

If a fuse can hand a short duration peak load of 5 times the steady state load then the 5.39 amp fuse can handle a short duration peak of 26.9 amps.

Therefore assuming the 55 watt lamp was fused at 7.5 amps then the fuse could handle a 37.5 amp short duration peak.

From the standpoint of the electrical wiring

Now assuming you were using stranded copper wiring and that the total distance between the battery and the 55 watt lamp was 3 feet and a 1% voltage drop was considered acceptable, then 16 awg wire would have a 1.04% drop.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
84 Posts
I have found that BMW's wiring to the headlight is barely adequate, so I added a separate fusebox and wired the lights directly to the battery, with much heavier wire. On my '98 KRS, the fusebox and relays fit nicely on the shelf in the left front sidepod:





You can see a writeup and schematic here:

http://skene.org/K1200RS/headlight-wiring/index.htm

The result is a much brighter headlight, as even a small voltage drop the the headlight causes a large drop in light output.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
106 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
>Now assuming you were using stranded copper wiring and that the total
>distance between the battery and the 55 watt lamp was 3 feet and a 1%
>voltage drop was considered acceptable, then 16 awg wire would have a
>1.04% drop.

That is fine for the positive side of the circuit, but the ground wire (also awg 16) carries the current from both lamps. In any event, I agreed that the awg 16 wiring is adequate theoretically. It even is adequate practically. The problems arise when you start adding in brass and steel terminals, then throwing in some vibration and corrosion.

It appears that the steel clip used as a common ground terminal for both lamps may be the largest factor. It gets hot enough to melt into the backside of the reflector. That much heat also loosens up the quick disconnect terminals on the clip, allowing surface corrosion between the contact points and causing additional resistance and even more heat.

That's why squeezing the terminals, so they get a good grip on the clip again, can fix the problem temporarily. I've considered several possibilities, but I'm leaning towards one solution which won't require any additional parts or new parts to permanently solve the problem. I'll have to take a closer look at the lamp sockets the next time I take the headlight assembly off to apply the temporary fix again, which probably won't be until spring.

regards,
Joe
 

·
Addict
Joined
·
3,750 Posts
I can't remember this ground terminal detail that well, but most H series auto lamps use sockets based on the standard 1/4" blade terminals which can have a good bite into the blade on the lamps. They are good up to 30 amps plus and both hot and ground wires come out.

Using a rear push on lamp connector means the hot and ground wires can be taken into the loom to a soldered junction.

I like soldering and prefer it over crimps because you can heat sleeve and keep water out. That's the principle BMW adopted in the terminal box where many junctions end up.



Never pay again for live sex! | Hot girls doing naughty stuff for free! | Chat for free!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
106 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
All right, I didn't want to go into the details yet, because I was paying more attention to the wiring than the socket and steel spring clip, but here it is based on what may be a wrong memory.

One socket (High) has a ground wire with quick disconnect terminal, going to a quick disconnect terminal connected to the spring clip on the other socket (Low). Socket (Low) is grounded by the spring clip pressing on the end of the blade terminal. The harness ground wire is terminated with a quick disconnect on the spring clip.

The heating occurs at the spring clip terminal that the harness ground wire is connected to. That terminal is the one that carries the total current of both lamps.

The most obvious solution would seem to be to unplug the harness connection from the spring clip. Pop the spring clip off of the blade terminal on the socket. Bend the body of the harness quick disconnect connector about 90°, so the connector can be pushed down on the socket blade far enough to allow the spring clip to pop back onto the end of the blade again. Then modify the socket (High) ground wire so it is spliced directly to the harness ground wire, instead of going to the spring clip.

If the splice to the harness wire is made without cutting the harness wire, then there will be no high resistance point for the total current to generate heat at. I've done such splices before and it's not difficult, but does require a careful touch when cutting a section of insulation off the center of the harness wire, to avoid nicking the conductor. Whether the splice is soldered or swaged, doesn't really matter, just so it isn't made with some crappy cheap crimp tool.

What I am not sure about is, how much room there is on the blade terminal under the spring clip. It may turn out to be necessary to modify the quick disconnect more than simply bending it 90°.

regards,
Joe
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,791 Posts


I have been following this post with interest, and as I have taken out my headlight yesterday while waiting for my HID kit, here are some pics for all your ponderings.

The bulb that is grounded via the spring retainer is the High Beam, there is two ground wires, one comes from the plug, the other one goes to the Low Beam and both the connectors on the spring retainer are too loose on my bike.....! So as both lights are on on High beams, 110 W, and it is all grounded with a single 16 ga. wire leaving the headlight assembly.....I don't want to do the math here but.......

It is easy enough to remove the "Ground Spring" out of the Hi Beam socket, I am thinking of drilling a hole in the back of the plastic socket, then one into the spring with my sheet metal punch, inserting a 14 ga wire through and soldering it right on the inside of the spring or maybe use a small machine bolt with a locknut and an eye terminal on the outside of the socket ,and then bring the wire back to the battery. I will just leave all the original ground wiring in place. Anything not to have to unglue that headlight assembly......!

Anyone knew that there is a lateral adjustment on that headlight?

But looking into my electrical junk box, I may even have enough 8 Ga. wire to bring it to the front somewhere and install a permanent ground post there, that way if I install any equipment I do not have to bring any extra wires back to the battery, and at the same time keeping the battery terminals less crowded. I like the idea of the previous post, having a fuse box in front, but it is all pretty crowded on my bike with the alarm system and cruise control, may be hard to install something reasonnably accessible.....but not impossible....!

For my HID conversion I will be using a relay to power the ballast right from the battery, a more stable power supply seems to be necessary for long ballast life.

I have already done some voltage drop tests and altough I did not get anything close to the 0.5 V mentioned in an earlier post, it was still significant at 0.25 V while applying the brakes thus running the servos and brake light.I will be doing more tests today and probably rig the relay temporarly to see how much improvment it will give. I really want to get rid of that annoying dip in the headlight on applying the brakes, I find it very distracting on dark mountain roads when you need all your concentration......!

I'll post some pics of that Hi-beam socket conversion.....! :thumb:
 
1 - 20 of 24 Posts
Top