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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, all. I recently purchased a low-mileage 2004 K1200RS. The only thing it didn't have was a heated seat. Last week while in the USA visiting relative, I came across a heated seat for a 2004 K1200GT in excellent condition and pretty affordable (by Australian standards, anyway) so it came home with me Just curious if anyone has ever fitted the GT seat to an RS and how the wiring and switching was done. I didn't get the left hand throttle switch gear so I'm hoping there's a way to set this up without this.

Also, can someone direct me to a wiring diagram for the 2004 K1200RS?.
 

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Hi, all. I recently purchased a low-mileage 2004 K1200RS. The only thing it didn't have was a heated seat. Last week while in the USA visiting relative, I came across a heated seat for a 2004 K1200GT in excellent condition and pretty affordable (by Australian standards, anyway) so it came home with me Just curious if anyone has ever fitted the GT seat to an RS and how the wiring and switching was done. I didn't get the left hand throttle switch gear so I'm hoping there's a way to set this up without this.

Also, can someone direct me to a wiring diagram for the 2004 K1200RS?.
BMW parts fiche has different part number for the main wiring harness for K1200GT (compare to K1200RS). Based on knowledge from 3 different K1200RS-GT forums for more than 15 years, it has been my understanding that no K1200RS has the proper added wiring installed from factory. Neither could you wire / installed the K1200GT right combo switch having the heated seat 2 position switch, UNLESS you have the proper junction in electrical box under fuel tank.

Unlike the heated grips that had a retrofit kit, the heated seat was a factory install option only.

However, since you have a K1200RS of 2004 , you do have the new fuse-box setup with 8 fuses on each side. Hence , your K1200RS may have some wiring / power being fed into fuse 16 although this one is normally marked as "unused" in the K1200RS manual of 2003-2005. See photo below...

Of course, if you are pretty good with electrical modifications, nothing stops you from doing a custom install with a 3 position switch installed in fairing somewhere. If you want, I can include a PDF file that was published many years ago by a member on another K1200 forum: he has included an electrical diagram and a few (very limited) photos of his custom installation.

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
BMW parts fiche has different part number for the main wiring harness for K1200GT (compare to K1200RS). Based on knowledge from 3 different K1200RS-GT forums for more than 15 years, it has been my understanding that no K1200RS has the proper added wiring installed from factory. Neither could you wire / installed the K1200GT right combo switch having the heated seat 2 position switch, UNLESS you have the proper junction in electrical box under fuel tank.

Unlike the heated grips that had a retrofit kit, the heated seat was a factory install option only.

However, since you have a K1200RS of 2004 , you do have the new fuse-box setup with 8 fuses on each side. Hence , your K1200RS may have some wiring / power being fed into fuse 16 although this one is normally marked as "unused" in the K1200RS manual of 2003-2005. See photo below...

Of course, if you are pretty good with electrical modifications, nothing stops you from doing a custom install with a 3 position switch installed in fairing somewhere. If you want, I can include a PDF file that was published many years ago by a member on another K1200 forum: he has included an electrical diagram and a few (very limited) photos of his custom installation.

View attachment 31394
Thanks, Jean. I would really appreciate the PDF wiring details of the installation you referred to. I expected that it wouldn't be plug-and-play. Realising that I will have to do some wiring changes, I'm still hoping I can use the K1200GT right combo switch to control everything. I'm hoping that I will be able to plug the grip heaters directly into the wiring loom. I expect that the seat heater will require power being fed from fuse position 14 or 16.
 

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Thanks, Jean. I would really appreciate the PDF wiring details of the installation you referred to. I expected that it wouldn't be plug-and-play. Realising that I will have to do some wiring changes, I'm still hoping I can use the K1200GT right combo switch to control everything. I'm hoping that I will be able to plug the grip heaters directly into the wiring loom. I expect that the seat heater will require power being fed from fuse position 14 or 16.
As you will read, the person who wrote the document (see attached PDF file at bottom) choose NOT to use a K1200GT right-side handlebar switch. I do not recall the whole context of the forum thread created by this user - it has been many years and the forum content was lost a few years later (this is the old I-bmw.com site) All I have kept was his summary as posted here.

For these reasons (see below) I would probably do the same and install another type of 3 position switch as he did:
1) The needed right handlebar combo switch with correct end connector is very hard to find used as it is specific to K1200GT of 2003-2005. In Europe they sold some K1200GT without the so-called "heated package" option so there are some K1200GT being parted in Europe (on EBAY) that do not even have the proper switch. In USA most K1200GT of this era where imported with the heating grips and seat option.

2) If bought brand new, this right hand side switch is about $US$ 350 - a bit cost prohibitive...

3) In addition to the items above, I am not even sure that K1200RS of last generation like yours (2003-2005) have all the needed wiring in the electrical junction relay box. This is where both handlebar combo switch end up for final connection into main wiring harness. If you have the patience to open the lower electrical junction box under fuel-tank, I can furnish photos of specific BLACK 18 pins connector to check. I also have a list of needed wire colors to check if they are present at this junction.

QUESTION: I see you are in Australia - I have always wondered if the K1200RS sold down under had the ON-OFF headlamp option on the right hand switch ?? Here in Canada there is no such thing as the headlight must always be ON, but some countries in Europe had these until 2002 at least. When they introduced the K1200GT in 2003, BMW choose to use this Headlight ON-OFF switch location on right handlebar for the heated-seat 3 position switch (see composite photo below to compare).


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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
As you will read, the person who wrote the document (see attached PDF file) choose NOT to use a K1200GT right-side handlebar switch. I do not recall the whole context of the forum thread created by this user - it has been many years and the forum content was lost a few years later (this is the old I-bmw.com site) All I have kept was his summary as posted here.

For these reasons (see below) I would probably do the same and install another type of 3 position switch as he did:
1) The needed right handlebar combo switch with correct end connector is very hard to find used as it is specific to K1200GT of 2003-2005. In Europe they sold some K1200GT without the so-called "heated package" option so there are some K1200GT being parted in Europe (on EBAY) that do not even have the proper switch. In USA most K1200GT of this era where imported with the heating grips and seat option.

2) If bought brand new, this right hand side switch is about $US$ 350 - a bit cost prohibitive...

3) In addition to the items above, I am not even sure that K1200RS of last generation like yours (2003-2005) have all the needed wiring in the electrical junction relay box. This is where both handlebar combo switch end up for final connection into main wiring harness. If you have the patience to open the lower electrical junction box under fuel-tank, I can furnish photos of specific BLACK 18 pins connector to check. I also have a list of needed wire colors to check if they are present at this junction.

QUESTION: I see you are in Australia - I have always wondered if the K1200RS sold down under had the ON-OFF headlamp option on the right hand switch ?? Here in Canada there is no such thing as the headlight must always be ON, but some countries in Europe had these until 2002 at least.
Thanks, Jean. I'll study the PDF tonight and decide how to proceed. I've been in touch with Beemer Boneyard about a handlebar combo switch for a 2003-05 bike. They don't have one but I'm on the list incase they find one in the future. I expect, though, it will come down to a 3 position aux. switch somewhere in the fairing.

In Oz, our bikes are like your with regards to the headlight. It's always on. Same thing on my 2000 Sportster. The only bikke I have with a headlight switch is my '77 KZ650 that I brought with me when we moved Downunder.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks, Jean. I'll study the PDF tonight and decide how to proceed. I've been in touch with Beemer Boneyard about a handlebar combo switch for a 2003-05 bike. They don't have one but I'm on the list incase they find one in the future. I expect, though, it will come down to a 3 position aux. switch somewhere in the fairing.

In Oz, our bikes are like your with regards to the headlight. It's always on. Same thing on my 2000 Sportster. The only bikke I have with a headlight switch is my '77 KZ650 that I brought with me when we moved Downunder.
 

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Thanks, Jean. I'll study the PDF tonight and decide how to proceed. I've been in touch with Beemer Boneyard about a handlebar combo switch for a 2003-05 bike. They don't have one but I'm on the list incase they find one in the future. I expect, though, it will come down to a 3 position aux. switch somewhere in the fairing.

In Oz, our bikes are like your with regards to the headlight. It's always on. Same thing on my 2000 Sportster. The only bikke I have with a headlight switch is my '77 KZ650 that I brought with me when we moved Downunder.
Mike,
I would NOT spent any money for a K1200GT right handlebar switch UNLESS I had opened the lower electric junction box to check type / size of connector used on yours.

I know what connector will come with the right had switch of a K1200GT of 2003-2005 , however I am NOT 100% sure that your K1200RS of last generation will have the same pairing connector - it should but I would check before. Reason for being careful is the fact earlier K1200RS (before 2003) had a different type of connector for the right hand. When BMW introduced the K1200GT in 2003 with the new fuse-box design, they made a few other electrical wiring changes that also applied to K1200RS of 2003-2005.

See this ad on EBAY to see what the large BLACK 18 pins connector looks like:


The guy is selling the whole right hand handlebar with brake master-cylinder and switch for a K1200GT. In one of his last photo you can see the large BLACK connector. In your lower electrical junction box, this one will probably be located top where the previous type of connector was for earlier K1200RS. See the YELLOW circle in my photo below...


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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Mike,
I would NOT spent any money for a K1200GT right handlebar switch UNLESS I had opened the lower electric junction box to check type / size of connector used on yours.

I know what connector will come with the right had switch of a K1200GT of 2003-2005 , however I am NOT 100% sure that your K1200RS of last generation will have the same pairing connector - it should but I would check before. Reason for being careful is the fact earlier K1200RS (before 2003) had a different type of connector for the right hand. When BMW introduced the K1200GT in 2003 with the new fuse-box design, they made a few other electrical wiring changes that also applied to K1200RS of 2003-2005.

See this ad on EBAY to see what the large BLACK 18 pins connector looks like:


The guy is selling the whole right hand handlebar with brake master-cylinder and switch for a K1200GT. In one of his last photo you can see the large BLACK connector. In your lower electrical junction box, this one will probably be located top where the previous type of connector was for earlier K1200RS. See the YELLOW circle in my photo below...


View attachment 31444
i understand about the connectors being different. I was thinking I could swap connectors and maybe do some rewiring and re-pinning of the connectors. I’d like to have the switch for the heated seat on the handlebar along with the handgrip heaters turn signal, etc. so it looks like the bike came with the heated seat. But if that’s not doable, I’ll go with the auxiliary switch somewhere in the fairing.
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
BMW parts fiche has different part number for the main wiring harness for K1200GT (compare to K1200RS). Based on knowledge from 3 different K1200RS-GT forums for more than 15 years, it has been my understanding that no K1200RS has the proper added wiring installed from factory. Neither could you wire / installed the K1200GT right combo switch having the heated seat 2 position switch, UNLESS you have the proper junction in electrical box under fuel tank.

Unlike the heated grips that had a retrofit kit, the heated seat was a factory install option only.

However, since you have a K1200RS of 2004 , you do have the new fuse-box setup with 8 fuses on each side. Hence , your K1200RS may have some wiring / power being fed into fuse 16 although this one is normally marked as "unused" in the K1200RS manual of 2003-2005. See photo below...

Of course, if you are pretty good with electrical modifications, nothing stops you from doing a custom install with a 3 position switch installed in fairing somewhere. If you want, I can include a PDF file that was published many years ago by a member on another K1200 forum: he has included an electrical diagram and a few (very limited) photos of his custom installation.

View attachment 31394
Sailor, I'm starting the install on my heated GT seat. You were right. The right combo switch doesn't have the wiring connections to allow the use of a GT combo switch so I'll be following the same method in the PDF you provided.

Interestingly, the fuse block on my RS doesn't have power to the heated seat fuse position so I need to find someplace to pick up a switched power supply. I'm thinking that I can tap the feed for the auxiliary power outlet. It's fed from a 7.5 amp fuse so it should be OK as long as I don't plug in a heated jacket and use the seat heater at the same time.
 

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Sailor, I'm starting the install on my heated GT seat. You were right. The right combo switch doesn't have the wiring connections to allow the use of a GT combo switch so I'll be following the same method in the PDF you provided.

Interestingly, the fuse block on my RS doesn't have power to the heated seat fuse position so I need to find someplace to pick up a switched power supply. I'm thinking that I can tap the feed for the auxiliary power outlet. It's fed from a 7.5 amp fuse so it should be OK as long as I don't plug in a heated jacket and use the seat heater at the same time.
On K1200RS-GT, all factory power outlets (having DIN plugs) are directly connected to Battery. You may have 1 or 2 of these BUT these are NOT switched with ignition. It has been my understanding they did this on purpose so that this auxiliary plug can be used to connect a maintenance battery charger overnight (as I have done myself). Hence if you use this auxiliary plug power source , you risk forgetting to turn your seat off when parked and drain the battery quickly. I know a few who have done this with a GPS plugged overnight in this power outlet above left footrest.

A better / common method to use in such case is to:
1)
add a RELAY to the seat circuit - any good automotive Relay (having 4 or 5 pins) of capacity 10 amps or more is adequate for the seat circuit - this needs only 4 amps.

2) trigger the Relay using a known switched power source. The easier and safer source under the seat (or near) is the license plate wire along the right sub frame in the large 6 pins connector - see attached diagram below. For a 2004 model like yours, you could also pull a wire from fuse #4 - this is the feed to the Low-beam headlight PLUS license plate and few other dash lights. Do NOT use the rear/tail light wire as this is monitored by the ABS system. The license plate wire is NOT a problem as a Relay trigger - not to feed the seat directly of course.

NOTE: if you are not familiar with the concept of RELAY, the idea is that the trigger wire / pins of the RELAY (Pin 85 and 86 on Relay) will pull very little current to trigger a coil that will activate the higher Amps circuit between pin 30 and 87 of the Relay - to the seat in this case. On your motorcycle, BMW uses quite a few Relays to activate various items like Radiator fans , the Horn... Because of usage of Relay, they do not have to carry large wires (high Amps) thru the handlebar switches as an example. A car electrical system is full of Relays for the same reason.




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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks, John. I'm familiar with the concept and use of relays. The previous owner had installed a spade connector on the rear connector. I'm guessing he did the same thing and used this as the trigger feed for some accessory. I'm guessing that I can pick up the main power feed from the always hot accessory line, correct?
 

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Thanks, John. I'm familiar with the concept and use of relays. The previous owner had installed a spade connector on the rear connector. I'm guessing he did the same thing and used this as the trigger feed for some accessory. I'm guessing that I can pick up the main power feed from the always hot accessory line, correct?
If you are referring to the auxiliary power socket feed (plug located above left footrest), YES you could use this - either from the socket of the plug or from the fuse #13. Keep in mind that on 2003-2005 models like yours, BMW has downgraded the power socket to a 7.5 Amps fuse so that leaves you little room for other stuff plugged into same source (if needed) when the heated seat will be ON.

I have the BMW electrical diagram on a CD and it shows a reduction of 30% wire size for these 2003-2005 models compare to earlier K1200RS that had a 15 Amps power socket fuse. These diagrams are more complete than the ones in CLYMER , however these must be viewed using a Microsoft WIndows based application only and it has mediocre interface (in my opinion).

Another common method to interface the Relay is to connect the Relay 2 large power feed connectors (Pin 30 and 87 on most Relays) directly to battery pole. Assuming a "normally open" automotive Relay, it is not a problem to connect like this as the low-power trigger wires (Pin 85 and 86) will make current flow to seat ONLY when they activate the internal Relay coil on Ignition ON. The only downside of this method is that it creates a mess of wires onto battery poles. Normally a K1200R-GT should have only 1 large wire to positive pole AND 2 medium thick black wires to the negative battery pole.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
If you are referring to the auxiliary power socket feed (plug located above left footrest), YES you could use this - either from the socket of the plug or from the fuse #13. Keep in mind that on 2003-2005 models like yours, BMW has downgraded the power socket to a 7.5 Amps fuse so that leaves you little room for other stuff plugged into same source (if needed) when the heated seat will be ON.

I have the BMW electrical diagram on a CD and it shows a reduction of 30% wire size for these 2003-2005 models compare to earlier K1200RS that had a 15 Amps power socket fuse. These diagrams are more complete than the ones in CLYMER , however these must be viewed using a Microsoft WIndows based application only and it has mediocre interface (in my opinion).

Another common method to interface the Relay is to connect the Relay 2 large power feed connectors (Pin 30 and 87 on most Relays) directly to battery pole. Assuming a "normally open" automotive Relay, it is not a problem to connect like this as the low-power trigger wires (Pin 85 and 86) will make current flow to seat ONLY when they activate the internal Relay coil on Ignition ON. The only downside of this method is that it creates a mess of wires onto battery poles. Normally a K1200R-GT should have only 1 large wire to positive pole AND 2 medium thick black wires to the negative battery pole.
I sketched the circuit out last night (will post later). I'm going to use a relay to control the power feed from taps on the power socket. I know it's 7.5 amps so I'm not too worried about the load from the seat. The chances of overloading the circuit will be slim. There isn't much call for heated riding suits where I live and I've already got a separate feed into the battery for trickle charging.

I'll control the relay from a switched feed that the previous owner installed. That way, the power to the seat will be off when the ignition is off. I'm putting a two amp fuse between the power tap and the relay and a two position switch between the relay and the seat to control the two heating elements. The switch will be DPDT so I can install a LED pilot light on the instrument cluster to show the power is on or if the fuse has blown.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I sketched the circuit out last night (will post later). I'm going to use a relay to control the power feed from taps on the power socket. I know it's 7.5 amps so I'm not too worried about the load from the seat. The chances of overloading the circuit will be slim. There isn't much call for heated riding suits where I live and I've already got a separate feed into the battery for trickle charging.

I'll control the relay from a switched feed that the previous owner installed. That way, the power to the seat will be off when the ignition is off. I'm putting a two amp fuse between the power tap and the relay and a two position switch between the relay and the seat to control the two heating elements. The switch will be DPDT so I can install a LED pilot light on the instrument cluster to show the power is on or if the fuse has blown.
Here's the wiring sketch...
 

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Not sure if you completed your heated seat project, but I did the same a while back. I added a GT seat to my 2003 K1200RS, using a separate switch instead of the GT right handlebar controls. I installed the switch near the power socket, which is within reach while riding. In addition to the resources already provided here by others, I originally posted all my steps on the defunct i-BMW forum.

I don't have all the old text posts, but I do have some pictures that may be useful. Need to break up pictures across multiple posts, since can only attach 10 pics per post. I'll try to monitor this thread and answer any questions (based on my memory). I wish the i-BMW forum stuff was archived somewhere, there was a ton of great info lost when it went down.

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Discussion Starter · #17 · (Edited)
Not finished yet. I'm going to use a relay so whenever the ignition is off, the power from the battery is killed. (I tapped the power and ground leads from the aux power socket. I'm trying to decide where to put the switch, left side or right. There's a nice flat spot that I can reach on the right rear cowling piece but if I put it there, I'll need to install a plug to facilitate removal of the cowling.

After looking at your pics, I may rethink location before I drill any holes. I've not decided where to put the LED to show the seat is on. I was thinking about in the instrument cluster but I'm leary of messing around n the cluster. Maybe I can find a spot inside the front cowling where it's not obtrusive but I can see it.
(BTW, nice colour on the bike.)
 

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Thanks! I first saw the K1200RS at a dealership in Capri Blue when I had my R1200C Phoenix. I decided then that it would be my next bike/color. Even though blue wasn't really my thing, I really liked that color.

Despite my first hand-drawn diagram, I 'm pretty sure I tapped my battery power from a "load shed" relay circuit. I think that's what is shown in my 3rd picture. When I'm riding, I can't see the light on the switch to tell if the seat is on unless I lean over. However, the seat works pretty well and I can tell when it's warm. The GT seat has two levels of heating, so not sure how to configure the LED indicator to tell you which setting it's on. With the switch I used, I can tell by position/feel.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
"The GT seat has two levels of heating, so not sure how to configure the LED indicator to tell you which setting it's on."

I'm certainly no wiring guru but I think I've sorted the circuit out.

The attached drawing has a diode in the tri-colour LED circuit to allow you to put power to both anodes when switched to the low heat setting. This will give a yellow colour. When switched to the high setting, the diode chops the current to the green portion of the LED giving you a red LED.
 

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