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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
With just at 3K miles I can make some more comments about the KR versus the other bikes I've ridden lately (KRS, Z1000, R1150R and GS).

Simply, I like the KR better and better with every mile of experience I get. Very light and flicky feeling - as if I can enter any turn at any speed and the bike will handle it smoothly. (Mine came with Z6's- a first experience for me that is okay on both wet and dry pavement).

No wooble, no weave, no issues of any type.

Still sorting out my non-ESA suspension settings for my weight and roads.

There's a pic here somewhere if I can get the link posted.

 

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I dont have ESA/ABS either -I have adjusted my rear "preload" to 16clicks from Low I think I will change it 2 clicks lower and the "dampening" 2 turns from H -Im 200lb -Ill see how this works for me.
 

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Location is Fletcher??

Hello.
Just wondering if that is your name or your location?
Fletch
 

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chip4 said:
I dont have ESA/ABS either -I have adjusted my rear "preload" to 16clicks from Low I think I will change it 2 clicks lower and the "dampening" 2 turns from H -Im 200lb -Ill see how this works for me.
General rule for suspensions
Set the preload first (rider sag)
Check static sag
Set the rebound (if adjustable)
Set the compression (if adjustable...some have both low-speed and high-speed settings)
Preload should be set such that the bike is sitting (at rest) at the 1/3 travel point from full extension (rear wheel off the ground) with the bike normally loaded (you included).
The K1200RS/GT rear travel is 6 inches (well, really 5.9+), so the preload setting should be 2 inches. I don't know what the suspension travel of the K-S or K-R is, but the preload should be set at about 1/3 of the full suspension travel.
Static sag...I can't remember the numbers, but it's more for getting the right spring than an adjustment.
Rebound: When the shock returns from a compressed situation, adjust the rebound by decreasing the damping until it overshoots and returns to the normal rest point, then add damping until it stops at the normal rest point without overshooting. The object is to get the shock back to the normal rest point the quickest. Too little damping and it overshoots, taking longer to get to the normal rest point. Too much, and it's too slow getting to that rest point.
Compression is more of a user-feel adjustment. You don't want the suspension to bottom out (too little damping), but you don't want the bumps and jolts (too much damping) transmitted to the bike (and to you) if you can avoid it. Low-speed compression (0-2 inches/second) is for bumps and pavement irregularities, and the high-speed side (2 inches to 15 feet/second) is for potholes and badly maintained railroad grade crossings.

Probably belongs in the Tech section...



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Thanks Ray, right now the rear is set up with the basic setting for one up riding which is for a 187lb rider, since I am only off from base ~13lbs, I have chosen to make my adjustments conservative, as the spring/shock is still pretty new less than 1500miles. Handling is still firm and I will have to adjust the dampening characteristics with preload.
 

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chip4 said:
Thanks Ray, right now the rear is set up with the basic setting for one up riding which is for a 187lb rider, since I am only off from base ~13lbs, I have chosen to make my adjustments conservative, as the spring/shock is still pretty new less than 1500miles. Handling is still firm and I will have to adjust the dampening characteristics with preload.
???
Damping is only going to be affected by adjusting the corresponding screw/knob(s). Preload will put the shock in a different rest position, and either raise or lower the bike more, but the damping will be the same.

Damping is done by forcing oil through holes in a disk inside the shock body. The adjustment is generally a larger than necessary hole by itself, and a tapered rod that goes into or out of the hole, depending on the setting. Close the hole off, and you have a higher damping setting, open it up and you get less damping action.

You can change the preload, though and the ride will be different, to be sure.




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Razel said:
???
Damping is only going to be affected by adjusting the corresponding screw/knob(s). Preload will put the shock in a different rest position, and either raise or lower the bike more, but the damping will be the same.

Damping is done by forcing oil through holes in a disk inside the shock body. The adjustment is generally a larger than necessary hole by itself, and a tapered rod that goes into or out of the hole, depending on the setting. Close the hole off, and you have a higher damping setting, open it up and you get less damping action.

You can change the preload, though and the ride will be different, to be sure.
On my bike, rear spring preload is adjusted via a knob comprised of 15 turns or 30 clicks. Shock damping is adjusted via an adjusting screw at the base of the shock -comprised of 3 and a half turns from this screw.

It aint rocket science that damping must be adapted to suit the preload. An increase of preload requires firmer damping, as Ive mentioned the base settings for my bike is in the middle of these adjustements and BMW has rated this base adjustment for a rider of approximately 187lbs. I have adjusted my suspension and have set up sag for all my previous bikes, GSXR1100, and ZX11 and GSXR1000, I am also familiar with the concept damping. I adjust my suspension settings based on weight/load, condition/characteristic of suspension and condition of road surfaces that I ride.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Dean

Dean,

Your tips have turned me into an image posting god!

Thanks for the help.

M
 
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