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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ohlin Rear Shock Install
I have finally transcribed my notes and posted my installation experience. My original instructions I took from Pirates How-to section. I have pictures, but I will have to post them in the future. Feel free to ask me any questions.

Preparation:

1) Inspect new shocks and make sure all the parts are in the box.

2) Gather all the required tools:
T-25 torx driver
latex gloves (these is optional, but I use them to help keep my hand clean)
torque wrench
metric hex wrench and sockets: 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, and 15mm
metric open end wrench: 14mm
wood shims
beffy pliers
hefty needle nose pliers
cleaning rag
Dremel tool with following bits: grinding, cutting, and polishing
screwdrivers (both phillips and flathead)

3) Remove seat and rear side panal fairings (left & right), remove the nose fairing, and remove the right side fairing, which is reqired to access the frame spring strut.
a. Require tools: T25 torx driver

4) Put the stock preload at the lowest setting.

5) Remove the rear brake line bracket bolt. This is located on the back side of the passenger foot rest.
a. Required tools: 5mm hex

Remove Stock Shock:

6) Remove lower bolt from the swing arm strut (connects the shock to the final drive). You will need to place the wood shims to help support the rear tire. This will take some pressure off the shock, which will make removing the bolt easier.
a. Required tools: 15mm hex, 14mm wrench, and wood shims

7) Remove the upper bolt from the frame (connects the shock to the frame). BMW uses some plastic nuts covers to protect the electrical wiring from chaffing, but are a pain in the rear. While assembling the bike, these covers are easy to install because the electrical lines were not present.
a. Required tools: 8mm hex, beffy pliers

8) Remove the stock preload adjuster on the left side of the bike.
a. Required tools: 8mm hex

9) Need to clear the preload adjuster through the frame to remove the shock assembly. This required a couple steps. Take a few minutes to study how the preload line runs from the adjuster to the shock, which should give you a decent idea what parts need to be removed
a. Remove the rear wheel.
Required tools: 8mm socket (I think, I ‘m sure you can figure this out)
b. Remove the upper wheel well. This was a pain, but with enough convincing the plastic bent enough to be removed.
Required tools: 3mm hex, Phillips
c. Remove bolt holding the coolant overflow reservoir and brake reservoir mounting bolt.
Required tools: 4mm hex, T-25 torx driver
d. Feed preload unit until it has cleared the frame.

10) Should be ready to remove the shock assembly. Slide the shock down towards the rear of the bike. By careful not to catch on the brake lines off the reservoir or you will be looking up directions on how to bleed your brakes.
a. Required tools: nothing, but you might want to take a cleaning rag and clean up the road grim that has accumulated on the final drive. With the shock removed you have good access.

Install Ohlin Shock:

11) Install the new Ohlin Shock. This will need to come in from the top, which is opposite of how the stock shock was removed. I had problems with the fit near the upper mounting bolt. Put the bottom mounting bolt and check the clearance of the top bolt. The frame casting on my bike needed to be trimmed down in order to give the Ohlin proper clearance. Use the Dremel tool with a grinding attachment to cut down the frame until the shock clears. I used a polishing attachment to make the frame shine a little, a little anal. Get both lower and upper mounting bolts into their spots.
a. Required tools: Dremel tool and cutting/polishing attachment.

12) Tighten the upper mounting bolt to the frame. Specs tighten to 43 Nm. I had trouble getting a wrench to the nut and I used of hefty needle nose pliers to grasp the nut.
a. Required tools: torque wrench, 8mm hex socket, hefty needle nose pliers

13) Tighten the lower mounting bolt to the final drive. Specs tighten to 50 Nm. You probably will want to place the torque from behind, which shouldn’t be a problem since the wheel is removed. The clearance from the front is difficult with brake lines.
a. Required tools: torque wrench, 14 mm wrench, and 15mm socket

14) Reattach the brake fluid reservoir and the brake line mount, respectively.
a. Required tools: T-25 torx driver, 5mm hex

15) Attach the Ohlins compression reservoir with the supplied clamps and rubber mounts as noted in the Ohlins diagram
a. Required tools: 4mm hex, flathead screwdriver

16) Run the preload line behind the fuse holder just underneath the gas tank. Attach the preload adjuster with the supplied bolts.
a. Required tools: 6mm hex

17) Replace the upper wheel well and the rear wheel. Replace the body fairings. The compression reservoir gets in the way of the side panel and I used a Dremel with a cutting tool to shave away the panel to make a snug fit.
a. Required tools: 3mm hex, phillips screwdriver, torque wrench, 8mm socket, T-25 torx driver, Dremel with cutting attachment.

18) Follow the Ohlins directions to tune the sag, dampening, rebound, and compression. Go have fun!!!
 

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no power in the 'verse can stop me
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Did you only replace the rear shock ??

Any plans to do the front ? Cuz, I gotta tell ya, you ain't lived til you've
removed and replaced a front shock. :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I wish I did

shook sez said:
Did you only replace the rear shock ??

Any plans to do the front ? Cuz, I gotta tell ya, you ain't lived til you've
removed and replaced a front shock. :D
I have been running out of free weekends to complete such an endevour. I wanted to make sure I got both shocks onto the bike within a couple hundred miles of each install. The shop installed the front in a couple hours while doing my 24k valves adjustments. Piss poor excuse, but that's life! :scratch:

ONON-
Mark
 

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no power in the 'verse can stop me
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Pathogen7 said:
The shop installed the front in a couple hours while doing my 24k valves adjustments. Piss poor excuse, but that's life! :scratch:

ONON-
Mark

Even better. The best tool sometimes is a stack of twenties. :)

Not that I ever find'em in MY toolbox.
 
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