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Breakin' in the S

  • Follow the recommendations in the manual

    Votes: 14 66.7%
  • Screw the manual...let her rip!

    Votes: 7 33.3%
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Here's one I bought earlier. Finally collected it last week. Dealer told me to keep it to 4000rpm. Sure handbook says 6000rpm. Any comments?

 

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Muddy said:
Here's one I bought earlier. Finally collected it last week. Dealer told me to keep it to 4000rpm. Sure handbook says 6000rpm. Any comments?

4000 + 6000 = 10,000 I think that is what they meant.

Nice Bike!
 

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I have a little bit similar picture from last summer:


I think you should make lot of accelerating and engine breaking before first service. Acceleratin will put pressure under piston rings and engine breaking sucks that dirt away. It will helpthose piston rings to settle better, but you don't have to do it till red line. Just keep it under 6000rpm as they say.
 

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Can't say...
Maybe he get that from another model, but max 6000rpm is what BMW recommends before first service for KS.
 

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Ya right

Baby it I can gaurtentee it will burn oil and run like shit

Flog it like you stole it
It is under warranty right?

Run it in properly and don't baby the thing
What freakin nonsense

Lots of decell and acelleration and let the thing breathe
jeez...............when have we ever listened to a dealer tell us how to break in

Flog the bitch, man!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
 

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Muddy said:
Here's one I bought earlier. Finally collected it last week. Dealer told me to keep it to 4000rpm. Sure handbook says 6000rpm. Any comments?

Hell, it's impossible to ride the bike at less than 4K. It keeps making your throttle hand twist. I think it's some desease that creeps into your hand...makes you go faster and faster:)

Hang on! You're about to have a lot of fun!
 

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I ran it in by taking it up and down the local bypass for 20 miles. On the downhill bits - so the engine wasn't that loaded I'd wind it right round to around 8k to start with and then shut the throttle shut to get the back pressure to bed the rings in. Then took it up to 9.5k then 11k, all the while accelareting and snapping the throttle shut - again only on the downhill stretch.

I then changed the oil and filter. You would be surprised how dirty the oil was.

Nicely run in now!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
4krpm running in??

That's what I thought - 4000rpm is barely ticking over. Maybe I should check with the dealer. Maybe BMW have recommended 4krpm since publishing the handbooks but I think the dealer's got it wrong.

Will keep you posted.
 

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Pg 58 owner's manual for 05 states 7000 rpm max for first 1000 km. I always follow the book on my bikes , cars and boats; only seems logical to me. Why second guess the engineers that designed the bike?
 

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scarter said:
Pg 58 owner's manual for 05 states 7000 rpm max for first 1000 km. I always follow the book on my bikes , cars and boats; only seems logical to me. Why second guess the engineers that designed the bike?
Never ceases to amaze me that so many people try to :rolleyes:

@Muddy FWIW my dealer told me (in writing no less) to keep it between 2500 and 4000 for the first 200km and then as per the handbook (<7000 until the first service) - that first 200k was very trying I can tell you.

Steve
 

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Muddy said:
Here's one I bought earlier. Finally collected it last week. Dealer told me to keep it to 4000rpm. Sure handbook says 6000rpm. Any comments?
If you are referring to breaking it in, the RPM is almost irelivant!

What matters is not to expose the motor to excessive load (and thus heat). It is FAR better on the motor to allow it to whizz along at 6000RPM under light throttle load, as opposed to shifting up 3 gears and slogging along at 2500 or 3000 and thus requiring a lot of throttle opening to keep up the same speed.

The former scenario generates little internal heat, and the high RPM helps speed up the breakin process.

The latter (because of a wider throttle opening) generates a lot more internal heat, causing the pistons and other tight clearance parts to expand and potentially start binding before they are properly worn in.

Blanket statements like "stay below X RPM" are intentionally simplistic, because the PROPER breakin instructions may be lost on some less-mechanically-inclined people, so manufacturers aim for the lowest common denomenator.

Bob.
 

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scarter said:
Pg 58 owner's manual for 05 states 7000 rpm max for first 1000 km. I always follow the book on my bikes , cars and boats; only seems logical to me. Why second guess the engineers that designed the bike?
Because REAL ENGINEERS who designed the thing actually understand the breakin process and would never break it in this way in the first place!

Have a look at my previous post for an explanation on why this procedure is nowhere near optimium. It is marketing in their attempt to oversimplify things so the average buyer can have a set of simplistic rules, who set this procedure, not engineering.

Bob.
 

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RFWILSON said:
If you are referring to breaking it in, the RPM is almost irelivant!

What matters is not to expose the motor to excessive load (and thus heat). It is FAR better on the motor to allow it to whizz along at 6000RPM under light throttle load, as opposed to shifting up 3 gears and slogging along at 2500 or 3000 and thus requiring a lot of throttle opening to keep up the same speed.



Bob.

I agree, that's why I did the high rev runs on the downhill leg of the bypass. If you don't bed the rings in early on, you'll never bed them in properly.

You also need to bear in mind that they should have bench tested the engine at the factory to make sure it delivers the promised power and torque, so the engine will already have been up there at peak revs.
 

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zzrman said:
I agree, that's why I did the high rev runs on the downhill leg of the bypass. If you don't bed the rings in early on, you'll never bed them in properly.

You also need to bear in mind that they should have bench tested the engine at the factory to make sure it delivers the promised power and torque, so the engine will already have been up there at peak revs.
Actually, the one exception to avoiding wide throttle openings duting breakin, is when seating the rings.

The correct method there is to open the throttle to (say) 3/4 in 2nd gear, and wind it out to about 70% of the redline. Then (and this is important) close the throttle and let the bike coast back down to low RPM. Then repeat the process 5 to 10 times. This should be done as early in the bike's life as possible, before the cylinder walls get glazed.

The near-full throttle acceleration causes the rings to be forced hard against the cylinder walls to bed them in FAST. But the time spent doing this is very short, so heat buildup is minimal. The "coasting" phase allows the "high speed, but no load" scenario you refered to that allows oil to be sucked up and re-lubricate the rings, and also it allows the piston to cool again.

Ring bedding in is a quick procedure if done right. The absolute worst thing for bedding in rings is to "baby" the engine! This ensures the rings and the cylinder walls get glazed, and once this happens, it takes forever (as you mentioned) to get the rings properly bedded in.

Bob.
 

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Just to add my 2c worth to the running in discussion, I asked a sprint car engine builder how they were able to build an engine, run it in and then race it at max output with apparently so little prior runin and ring sealing prep. His reply was they put the engines on a dyno with progressive load and ran them up and down the rev range. Ten to twenty minutes done properly and the engines were good to go! This guy was building engines professionally with results on the board in terms of performance and reliability. Check the Motorman runin site. Mr RFWilson's suggestions also sound like a plan. From what I have learned strong, relatively short periods of accel / load followed by decell and time to disperse the high localised bore/rings temps is worth considering.

Cheers
Lenz
 

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Nothing like a Monday flame war over break-in procedures. I generally
followed the manual with no issues; crikey the dang thing makes
more power than the old k12 anyway at 7k. I 'm also pretty sure
that the revs are getting logged, the new RT records these and brake parameters
so i wouldn't be suprised.

When i did my first track day i only had 800 miles on it. Did the 600
mile service afterward and now with 7k on its time for my first
oil change. weeeeeeeeeeee!
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Poll for breaking in the K12S.

This will be interesting. We may need to add a third category though. "Keep it to 4000rpm for xxx miles then as per manual" or something similar.

Thanks for all the responses so far from which I'm going to follow this procedure:

0-200miles - <4000rpm
200-400miles - <5000rpm
400-600miles - <6000rpm

All miles with no large throttle openings and plenty of throttleing back to bed things in. I've always been told not to 'baby' new engines but neither am I going to exceed the max rpm recommended in the handbook.

Guess I've answered my own initial question. Can't wait for the poll results :)
 

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Muddy said:
This will be interesting. We may need to add a third category though. "Keep it to 4000rpm for xxx miles then as per manual" or something similar.

Thanks for all the responses so far from which I'm going to follow this procedure:

0-200miles - <4000rpm
200-400miles - <5000rpm
400-600miles - <6000rpm

All miles with no large throttle openings and plenty of throttleing back to bed things in. I've always been told not to 'baby' new engines but neither am I going to exceed the max rpm recommended in the handbook.

Guess I've answered my own initial question. Can't wait for the poll results :)
Suit yourself. But there is nothing at all magic about those RPM numbers. They are there only because Marketing wants to approach this as if it is a "Break In For Dummies" book. The engine (and in particular the rings) will benefit greatly by momentarily exceeding these arbitrary numbers, provided it is done properly with the understanding of the Engineering principles of breakin.

Blindly following these simplistic rules will result in an extended time before the motor is properly broken in.

Bob.
 
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