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Howdy Folks -

Have a flat battery on the 2010 k1300s, was considering alternatives to the BMW dealer battery (that's just north of $200). Typically I chuck in the most similar Odyssey battery to the motorbikes, but there doesn't seem to be a readily referenceable alternatives for the k1300s?

Let me know any successes with AGM battery alternatives to BMW. Any special fitment threads would be great to have as well! Not looking at the lithium batteries...

Cheers,

Steve
 

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2009 K1300S, 2017 S1000R
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How fortuitous, I just told a friend to get one of these, which I use. I like filling it myself, then I know it is fresh. I even keep one on the shelf when I know my current battery is 2 years old or more. It is shipped with acid in a separate container which you add in a simple process. Then you let it sit for a couple of hours so the acid can dispurse well. Next step is to put the battery on your motorcycle trickle charger for a couple of hours or if it is a smart charger I generally go over night or at least 6 hours. This last step gives you the last 20% of capacity that you seldom get from a dealer battery. Now put it in your bike and reset your clock.
 
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Just as fortuitous, I recommended this $42 chinese battery from Amazon to this site a few months ago. It has been doing great!
 

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Seems that way but not. Over 60% of electrical problems (and weird events) in these forums are caused by battery failure that owners fail to diagnose or admit to. The various needs for specific charging voltages between the types, current rates and limits, cause problems due to owners making a poor choice for a charging device. Then not understanding the batteries limits. How many times have you been handed a battery over the counter or installed in your bike and told good to go. NOT, it needs a hard charge for a couple of hours to get that last 20% capacity. It is just a storage device to start the bike, the alternator runs the show and keeps the battery charged. While your bike is running and you can observe voltage dropping down towards 13 volts or lower you know you have exceeded your alternator capacity and are running off the battery also now. Of course there is power available for minor uses when the bike is not running. The battery also smooths out voltage digressions from the charging system or (relays activating) like a cushion for the bike electrical systems (computers and lamps). Slow sulfation over the useful life of the battery (lead acid battery) degrades its ability to supply the needed current for starting. This degradation can be moderated by proper care but like most everything else, they do die. Like most BMW owners I keep my bikes on a smart charger most of the time but this can mask the failure of the battery. Seems up to snuff but it has reached the end due to sulfation. I have a couple of load testers, one cheap but effective coil heater type and another serious electronic. Most people have neither. They can test their battery easily by hooking up a volt ohm meter to the battery terminals and hitting the start button. If the voltage drops to 9.5 or less while cranking, get a new one. It's a consumable item. That low volts while cranking causes serious problems, note all the threads about welded starter relays lately. Spring and the start up rituals.
 
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I just put a Shorai Lithium polymer battery in my K13. Too early to say, but I have had no problems yet.
The Shorai is almost the same size as factory, but of course much lighter. I used one foam pad on the bottom and one on the side to keep it snug. Terminals are great.
 

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Seems that way but not. Over 60% of electrical problems (and weird events) in these forums are caused by battery failure that owners fail to diagnose or admit to. The various needs for specific charging voltages between the types, current rates and limits, cause problems due to owners making a poor choice for a charging device. Then not understanding the batteries limits. How many times have you been handed a battery over the counter or installed in your bike and told good to go. NOT, it needs a hard charge for a couple of hours to get that last 20% capacity. It is just a storage device to start the bike, the alternator runs the show and keeps the battery charged. While your bike is running and you can observe voltage dropping down towards 13 volts or lower you know you have exceeded your alternator capacity and are running off the battery also now. Of course there is power available for minor uses when the bike is not running. The battery also smooths out voltage digressions from the charging system or (relays activating) like a cushion for the bike electrical systems (computers and lamps). Slow sulfation over the useful life of the battery (lead acid battery) degrades its ability to supply the needed current for starting. This degradation can be moderated by proper care but like most everything else, they do die. Like most BMW owners I keep my bikes on a smart charger most of the time but this can mask the failure of the battery. Seems up to snuff but it has reached the end due to sulfation. I have a couple of load testers, one cheap but effective coil heater type and another serious electronic. Most people have neither. They can test their battery easily by hooking up a volt ohm meter to the battery terminals and hitting the start button. If the voltage drops to 9.5 or less while cranking, get a new one. It's a consumable item. That low volts while cranking causes serious problems, note all the threads about welded starter relays lately. Spring and the start up rituals.
I blame the German vehicle manufacturers (incl. BMW Motorrad) for building electrical devices too sensitive to handle a normal battery.

They overcomplciate things that require ridiculous tolerances that then fail when exposed to the real world. The AAA equivalent in Germany refuses to jump start any vehicle anymore because the car makers are designing vehicles poorly/stupidly (I tried to explain that my 1994 Hyundai piece of shit didn’t have this problem to no avail). Putting a trickle charger on a vehicle while it’s sitting is a ridiculous necessity. The vehicle should be able to handle any and all voltage fluctuations a bad battery can throw at it. Electronics are not necessarily sensitive.

I understand lead-acid batteries have a useful life, even still: they are extremely simple devices. If the vehicle demands it, a larger battery should be installed from the factory.
 

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Technically the only function of the battery is to start the vehicle. The alternator supplies all power needs and keeps the battery charged for the next start sequence and supply all the vehicle power needs. If the vehicle current draw gets so high that the alternator can't keep up then the battery gets drawn down. You will see this with system voltage dropping below rated generating voltage (about 14.2 VDC). If the battery is old and sulfated this draw down event can happen quickly. Also as mentioned the battery helps with voltage spikes and of course the alternator system is designed to have an operating batterin in the circuit. Most do not happen any longer because relays have damping circuits to help when they open and computers protect things. Personally I have found BMW motorcycle electronics hold up well. Though seems not good as we all expect...no problems. Many of the sensors are supplied by outside sources, there can be problems if not made to exact specs and expectations of BMW engineers. I try to tell people to change their battery every three years. And the big bugabo with batteries and some electronic items, just because they are new does not mean they are in top condition. I have been hit hard on vessels when more than one reconditioned device was no good and complicated trouble shooting. I've learned to be very suspecious.
 

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I installed one of these Lithium batteries shortly after I got my bike. I've had zero "hot start" issues so far. I ran Lithium in my previous bikes for several years that had no issues. For me, they lasted longer and had better cranking power than the AGM versions. Plus, it only weighs a couple of pounds. Granted, you have to have a charger specific for Lithium, but they're a lot more common now too..
X2-Power Battery
 

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That sucks when you get a battery that's bad from new. There is no reason for that to happen. The manufacturer or seller should be able to perform the most basic test before selling you a battery.

Do lithium-ion batteries last appreciably longer? That would be a huge selling point for me. A 3-year lifespan from a battery is shit.
 
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