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Discussion Starter #1
Feeling good dismantling - heading to replace clutch. Come across the high torque fits on swing arm - right side ok. But left side... the bearing journal or pivot pin (different naming in ETK & manual) - those suckers with a M14 Hex hed.... Actually broke a sidcrome socket! In the process it rounded the hex head corners. Now, cannot get sufficient bite to do anything. Someone must have been through this before? What is the next step besides F#@[email protected]!$!#!? Common to use heat on bike frame section? Easi-outs - not sure if they could handle the torque.

Colin
2000 K1200RS Pacific Blue
 

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Yes, put a heat gun to it and use an impact socket with a long breaker bar. You're at the hardest part of the procedure - getting the swingarm off.

Brent
 

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Sorry Colin, just re-read your post and missed the rounded-off bolt part on first read. I would think its going to be tough with an easy-out. Being that piece does not actually attach the swingarm to the frame, is there any way you can manuever the swingarm away from the frame with removing the piece?
 

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Reason # 1 to leave the rear drive and swingarm asembled and remove as one unit from the frame/tranny. That is how I would proceed.

I am assuming you did loosen the lock nut on the pivot pin side.

The pivot side is not very tight, relying on the locknut to secure it. The fixed side (right side sitting on bike) is the one that gets torqued about ??80 lt lbs.

I would not even try an easy out if you have already broken off a 14mm allen socket and rounded off the flats inside the pin.

Once the entire drive/swingarm is off, you will have another chance to remove the pivot pin or fixed pin. Concentrate heat from a small tip of an Ox-Acytelene applied directly to the pin with the boogered head, until the inner edges of the recess begin to turn red. Shut down the torch, spray it with WD40 or something and as it the heats soaks away into the aluminum housing, take a large flat punch (1/2" drive extension) and pop the head of the pin with the extension and a hammer once or twice to disturb the flats and swell them inward. Then knock a good 14mm allen socket into the newly swelled flats and remove the pin.


HTH.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Swing arm removal

Thanks for the help. Mike, I'll give your suggestions a try. However, just to make sure we are talking about the same thing, there is no facility for an allen key in the pivot pin. I have attached a picture, now the hex head is getting more difficult to distinguish, I got to it with a cold chisel - usually shifts everything I've come up against. However, this sucker has not budged. This is the part that screws into the swing arm itself. Also applied heat with a heat gun - maybe up to 80 degrees C. I'm starting to wonder what the thread direction is? Is it a conventional right hand thread - anti-clockwise to extract?

I have yet to look at how to get to the drive shaft to remove. I presume I do not have to remove any snap rings from the uni-joint on the gearbox output shaft. Just have to lever the unijoint off the shaft? Access looks like fun!

Thanks again - summer is just starting here. I am bounded by desert here and already getting 43 degree C days. Rain - maybe it will rain next year for more than 3 days?
 

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Colin,
My mistake, I was thinking about the rear drive pivot/journals when I replied to your post.

I now see, from the pic you attached, that you are talking about the left side swingarm bearing journal. I have no idea why it would be so tight, it is not reversed thread. Heat, heat, & heat is my best advice.

Good Luck, let us know what you find.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Problem - Swing Arm Removal

Hi Mike.

I didn't think everything lined up. So failing any other suggestions, it looks like heat is the best way. Is there sufficient room to remove the swing arm and drive shaft from the frame with the left side bearing journals still installed?
 

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Im not entirely sure where that buggered bolt is. Nevertheless a technique that I have used to remove stubborn bolts is to weld the socket (several techniques I can offer) to the bolt. Never failed yet. Cut a hole in a welding blanket to provide protection for surrouinding surfaces. It is a small recess there but it looks doable.l
 

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ColB101 said:
Is there sufficient room to remove the swing arm and drive shaft from the frame with the left side bearing journals still installed?
I'm not sure if there is or not enough but that's what I would try. Remove the tube cross member first and you might get enough flex out of the frame to squeeze it out?

Its not a reverse thread, but has a high torque spec of 160nm.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Rear Swing Arm Removal

Worthy to note that you can remove the swing arm with one of the pivot pins still installed. Very easy - after removing the exhaust, cross tube, then lever off the front drive shaft off the gearbox output shaft. Pull that thru the swing arm, then the swing arm can be removed easily. Now I can weld a nut onto the buggered pivot pin and get the sucker off.
 

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That's great news Colin! Let us know how the extraction goes. Maybe some pics?
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Heading to the Clutch

Removed swing arm & drive shaft. Also removed clutch slave cylinder. Interesting to see material in the bottom of the recess. When I first looked, it looked like dirty sand. Then after touching - it is like foam. I know there is a new felt seal - maybe the original on a 2000 model were foam - hence the change. There was nothing left on the rod. Interesting when talking with dealer mechanics in Australia - most problems occur with gearbox input seal - rarely engine rear seal.... and never the slave cylinder. Number of sales of replacement slave cylinders - about one in the last 11 months! Doesn't sound like a problem here. Looks like I have to remove battery carrier and disconnect piping from abs to rear brake next. It will be interesting to see how far the frame can be lifted to get access. Most BMW repairers use graphite powder on clutch splines - any else use that?

Hopefully will finish this weekend and I can start to install aftermarket cruise control.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Clutch Replacement

Here are some shots of the clutch slave cylinder removed. When I first looked, it looked as though it had some sand in there. But this was like a crumpled foam. Maybe the felt seal deteriorating?

Reason for clutch slippage - no oil, but clutch plate was down to 4.75 mm (service limit 4.5) so it is probably that with loss of "spring" force.


Colin
2000 K12RS Pacific Blue
 

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I joined your thread a bit late. My front swingarm journals were the easiest because you can get some oil around there from the motor. It was my rear journals that had the seizure.

Now once you have exhausted all reasonable means of getting a journal out you have got the right idea to drill it out. Yes it is messy, but do it right and you save the price of an expensive swingarm.

My technique on the rears was to drill around and close to the swingarm threads without actually touching them. Then I got a small hacksaw blade and got in a little closer to the threads. Finally, I used a small sharp chisel to knock the journal in to the centre, working around the outside. Once you relieve the torque on the threads with 2 or 3 hacksaw cuts, it is even possible to get a grip wrench on the end of the hex you mashed up and twist it out. If not, just keep punching in to the center and breaking off fragments.

A tap that fine thread size is hard to find and expensive, so do not damage the swingarm threads and think you can easily go buy a tap!

I think you are into getting those parts from a BMW dealer, but from memory they are not too expensive (compared to a swingarm), so regard them as sacrificial.

In your attemp to get the journal out I hope you did not shift it then have it tighten and bin?. This is one of the risks of using an impact driver where you cannot feel the result. Their thread in the ali swingarm is very fine and can easily shed a thread turn. This locks up the journal and the harder you try to turn it the more damage it does to the thread. If heat and extreme torque has not shifted it, drill it out as you said. Slow but a lot cheaper.



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