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Discussion Starter #1
I am a new rider (very green) I’ve ridden a dirt bike a few times and put a couple hundred miles on a 200cc moped.
I keep hearing that 1200cc’s is too much bike for a beginner. I feel I am very responsible and precautious person by nature. I’m also taking the MSF course in a couple weeks.
You ‘guys got any advise/thought on this?
 

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I am a new rider (very green) I’ve ridden a dirt bike a few times and put a couple hundred miles on a 200cc moped.
I keep hearing that 1200cc’s is too much bike for a beginner. I feel I am very responsible and precautious person by nature. I’m also taking the MSF course in a couple weeks.
You ‘guys got any advise/thought on this?
You could be pre-cautious (??!) and precocious, and still have trouble handling the K12GT. Good start, to be taking the MSF course which teaches you how to ride a motorcycle. Unless things have changed, I never thought that the course prepared you properly for road riding.
Ride with the seat in the low position (unless you're overly tall) until you get the feel of the bike at slow speeds. EVO brakes will feel a little sensitive until you get used to them. Where are you located ?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
You could be pre-cautious (??!) and precocious, and still have trouble handling the K12GT. Good start, to be taking the MSF course which teaches you how to ride a motorcycle. Unless things have changed, I never thought that the course prepared you properly for road riding.
Ride with the seat in the low position (unless you're overly tall) until you get the feel of the bike at slow speeds. EVO brakes will feel a little sensitive until you get used to them. Where are you located ?
I’m up north in NY state ..about 90 minutes from Niagara Falls.
I’m looking forward to riding up there before the winter time.
 

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Well geez, you're not far away at all. Let's hope that we can both cross the border before the end of the riding season. A few years ago, I bought some K bike stuff from a guy who teaches the MSF in Rochester.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Unless your MSF instructor is a complete charlatan, hopefully he will advise you to get a smaller, more user friendly bike to learn on.
Lol. A friend of mine has an old Honda Hawk I’m hoping to do some riding on his old bike if possible.
It’s a bit of a struggle to get into the DMV now with the Covid crisis.
 

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I got my motorcycle endorsement after completing a new rider course on the supplied Honda 250’s over 20 years ago. I had a good friend loan me her Suzuki 650 single several times in what amounted to maybe 350 miles of experience shortly after I first got my license. Then > 15 years of no motorcycle experience. I’ve always been a cyclist and averaged 2000-6000 miles a year during most all of that time. Then I decided I wanted a motorcycle. Found a extremely clean 03 GT with barely 4000 miles on the clock. I knew it was too much bike, but I also felt like my cycling experience counted for something.

Read. Watch videos. Practice. I practiced all the skills for the advanced rider course, but on the day of we had heavy rain and 50 mph winds and I knew that even if I was stuck riding cross country I wouldn’t ride in those conditions so I didn’t go and subsequently never got into another advanced course.

Know your limitations. Be vigilant of other drivers (the biggest lesson from cycling). If you approach it with the proper respect, I’m proof positive it can be done. 3 years and 17,000 miles later..

I did encounter a guy the other day riding a brand new haysbussa. Said he won 250k in a scratch off and it was his first motorcycle. I suspect he’s dead now, but who knows, maybe god does look after children and fools.
 

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Ride the Honda Hawk first. Do that for the rest of the year, in fact. The K-GT is way too big a jump from an MSF course bike, regardless of your off-road experience.
 

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You could be pre-cautious (??!) and precocious, and still have trouble handling the K12GT. Good start, to be taking the MSF course which teaches you how to ride a motorcycle. Unless things have changed, I never thought that the course prepared you properly for road riding.
Ride with the seat in the low position (unless you're overly tall) until you get the feel of the bike at slow speeds. EVO brakes will feel a little sensitive until you get used to them. Where are you located ?
I went straight from the small bike I road in the Safety Training Course to a Honda ST1100, which is similar in size and weight to the K1200GT that I now ride. The Honda ST1100 was way too much bike for me as a beginner and it was a harrowing learning experience. I would strongly advise you to look for a smaller, lighter bike as your first bike and then after a couple years or so on that, move up to a big bike, like the K1200.
 

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Hi, If you can handle the weight of the bike and quickly learn how it steers/feels you will be fine. Just have a bit of respect in your right hand till you get use to it. From my perspective 'you can never have too much power, just the ability to use it'. Ride the bike for a while in quiet areas to get the feel and then try busier areas as you can full control.
Have fun
 

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I would store the bike for a year or two and get a middleweight bike like an SV or Wee Strom and sharpen your road skills. The odds aren't in your favor jumping up from a scooter to a GT. It's a great bike, don't ruin it by getting on it before you're ready.
 

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I am a new rider (very green) I’ve ridden a dirt bike a few times and put a couple hundred miles on a 200cc moped.
I keep hearing that 1200cc’s is too much bike for a beginner. I feel I am very responsible and precautious person by nature. I’m also taking the MSF course in a couple weeks.
You ‘guys got any advise/thought on this?
I am a new rider (very green) I’ve ridden a dirt bike a few times and put a couple hundred miles on a 200cc moped.
I keep hearing that 1200cc’s is too much bike for a beginner. I feel I am very responsible and precautious person by nature. I’m also taking the MSF course in a couple weeks.
You ‘guys got any advise/thought on this?
if you must use the spike do it after you’ve had and MSF course. Make sure you can ride in an open area and that you can flat foot your feet on the ground the K 1200 RS Has a good clutch feel moving ahead from first gear just keep in mind that very slow speeds in specially interns the bike is extremely top-heavy want to move in you 5 miles an hour in above 5 miles an hour and above will not notice it Very much. Can be a real handful in the tight stuff so work into those corners with a very moderate speed. Set your self up for the corners by breaking before you Get to them and then was on the power as you’re going through. Down here all left-handers will take a while before you’re more comfortable in these situations.
 

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Firstly, thank you for deciding to take the MSF course. Completing the MSF course is the best and safest way to start riding. The course assumes you know how to ride a bicycle and teaches you everything about riding a motorcycle from that point on. Secondly, here is my history so you can get some context about my advice. I started riding five years ago in my 50's as a way to commute to work. I started out by completing the MSF course and then went looking for a scooter. First scooter was a Suzuki Burgman 650. I crashed this bike on the third ride because I looked at the curb instead of the direction I wanted to go. Second scooter was an Aprilia Scarabeo 500, that I rode for about a year and 7,000 miles. Got bored with the scooter and traded the scooter for my first motorcycle, a BMW K1200GT.

So technically, my BMW K1200GT was my first motorcycle.

Of the three bikes, the BMW K1200GT is the easiest to ride, if you respect the horsepower AND the brakes. I really didn't understand counter steering and leaning the bike over until I started riding my BMW. The BMW gave me a lot of confidence because it was easy to ride. I respected the throttle so speed wasn't a problem. I had trouble braking smoothly until a friend of mine suggested I use two fingers instead of four. The brakes are that powerful. The front brakes are so powerful that the bike will throw you over the handlebars and laugh at you while saying,"I told you I have good brakes!", if you do not respect the brakes.

I traded the BMW for a Moto Guzzi Breva 750 because I wasn't using the bike as the bike was designed. I ride maybe 50 miles a day and sometimes in stop and go traffic. The BMW is a terrible knock around town bike. The BMW is better suited for long distance riding. 185 miles is nothing on the BMW. The Breva is probably 400 pounds while the BMW is around 700 pounds

So ask yourself what you intend to use the bike for. If you are looking for an errand bike and hang out with friends bike, the BMW is not a good bike. If you have the time to go 200 miles a ride and still come home refreshed, the BMW is a great bike.

If you have access to the bike, try this little exercise. Push the bike around. If you have the bike in a garage, push it into the garage, turn it around, and push it back out. If you can do that without any effort, you are very strong because a K1200 is a 700 pound bike. I bought a little trolley that the center stand uses so that I could easily push the bike around in the garage. If you can't push the bike around, you'll be riding it every where, literally. My BMW was so heavy that I couldn't stand next to the bike and push. I always had to straddle and walk the bike. Gently put the BMW on its side and see if you can pick it up. If you don't think you can do that, watch a couple of YouTube videos on picking up a Honda GoldWing before you attempt to pick up the BMW. With the right technique, you can pick up the BMW by yourself.

Think of my post as the practical side of owning a BMW as a first bike.

One more thing, BMW parts are frightfully expensive. You will drop the bike so ask yourself if you can afford the parts and labor to fix the bike.
 

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I am a new rider (very green) I’ve ridden a dirt bike a few times and put a couple hundred miles on a 200cc moped.
I keep hearing that 1200cc’s is too much bike for a beginner. I feel I am very responsible and precautious person by nature. I’m also taking the MSF course in a couple weeks.
You ‘guys got any advise/thought on this?
 

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Please ride something less expensive to fix your first year of riding. All new riders make errors while they learn - it is completely normal to do something dumb that results in the bike hitting the ground - lose your balance getting the bike off the center stand - put your foot down at a stop light and slip on the oil slick in the center of the lane.... and bam down it goes! When riding the K bike an error like that could easily cost you 2-3 thousand dollars to repair the damage to the fairing and body panels.. It would be much cheaper to make those mistakes on that Honda. Ride that Honda every day for the rest of this summer - aim to put a few thousand miles on the Honda - if you do, you will be ready to move up to the K bike by next spring. Just remember it is much faster and heavier than anything you've ridden before, so ride it carefully and stay away from heavy traffic until riding it has become second nature. You really need two bikes, anyway - The K bike is a superb touring bike - it was designed for taking long trips cross country. It isn't really suitable for short jaunts around town.
 

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Look at a 5-10 year old F800r bike. They're cheaper, lighter, not as powerful, great brakes and handle well, light enough to learn well and heavy enough to encourage care. You can still get caught speeding and you can die just as quick. Damage and death might be delayed though, as a novice, like a returning middle aged motorcyclist on a modern big and powerful bike, is the proverbial donorcyclist. Statistically proven.

The real smart money is to buy a cheaper bike, not so flash, a bike that won't bother you too much if you damage it. As a learner you're likely to drop it on gravel, in the carpark, in the shed just doing innocuous stuff. Don't kid yourself into thinking "it won't happen to me".

Learn to know the ground and slope under you and always park where you can put your left foot down easily without a deeper reach. Learn the centre of gravity you can manage as once the bike passes it's tip over point, your calisthenic ability becomes important as you jump and roll.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Well geez, you're not far away at all. Let's hope that we can both cross the border before the end of the riding season. A few years ago, I bought some K bike stuff from a guy who teaches the MSF in Rochester.
Unfortunately ..It’s not looking very likely.

Thanks for your insight
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I got my motorcycle endorsement after completing a new rider course on the supplied Honda 250’s over 20 years ago. I had a good friend loan me her Suzuki 650 single several times in what amounted to maybe 350 miles of experience shortly after I first got my license. Then > 15 years of no motorcycle experience. I’ve always been a cyclist and averaged 2000-6000 miles a year during most all of that time. Then I decided I wanted a motorcycle. Found a extremely clean 03 GT with barely 4000 miles on the clock. I knew it was too much bike, but I also felt like my cycling experience counted for something.

Read. Watch videos. Practice. I practiced all the skills for the advanced rider course, but on the day of we had heavy rain and 50 mph winds and I knew that even if I was stuck riding cross country I wouldn’t ride in those conditions so I didn’t go and subsequently never got into another advanced course.

Know your limitations. Be vigilant of other drivers (the biggest lesson from cycling). If you approach it with the proper respect, I’m proof positive it can be done. 3 years and 17,000 miles later..

I did encounter a guy the other day riding a brand new haysbussa. Said he won 250k in a scratch off and it was his first motorcycle. I suspect he’s dead now, but who knows, maybe god does look after children and fools.
Thanks for the advice ..so far I’ve gone around the block 1000x and spent 2-3 house in the lot right around the corner.
I’m definitely feeling much more confident which equates to a few thousand more rides around the block and maybe 10 more hours in the lot before I even consider hitting the road.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Hi, If you can handle the weight of the bike and quickly learn how it steers/feels you will be fine. Just have a bit of respect in your right hand till you get use to it. From my perspective 'you can never have too much power, just the ability to use it'. Ride the bike for a while in quiet areas to get the feel and then try busier areas as you can full control.
Have fun
Definitely, thanks for the insight.
I would store the bike for a year or two and get a middleweight bike like an SV or Wee Strom and sharpen your road skills. The odds aren't in your favor jumping up from a scooter to a GT. It's a great bike, don't ruin it by getting on it before you're ready.
Hopefully I can make that happen.

I fell off the moped once on wet grass then on gravel ..so I definitely hear what you’re saying
 

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Definitely, thanks for the insight.

Hopefully I can make that happen.

I fell off the moped once on wet grass then on gravel ..so I definitely hear what you’re saying
It's good you have some experience, I like you learned on dirt first, then 30 years later, decided to go on the road. Big difference off the go.. crashing on the cement is nothing like crashing on dirt.. Plus, on the street you have some drivers that don't see or look out for motorcycles let alone pay attention otr. So you needs eyes everywhere and yes, the bike is alot heavier. I got a K12RS, so i know fast, and yours is very fast too.. you need big respect on these type bikes. And eyes on everything.. Pool trucks dump water on turns, maybe a garbage truck has a leak, any wetness and this bike with the torque it has, will spin out. And Beemer's are expensive to fix.. but that said, they are great bikes and well built.
But I would agree with getting on a 650 or a nice 900 cruiser type first.. where like a few said, you can touch the ground and learn the control points needed to really enjoy riding.. Otherwise if you can't afford or don't care to do that, take your time and go slow.. but that's really hard when you got a muscle type bike.. As one said, know your limits, take your time, and you'll be around to ride for a long time.Get too rambunctious and think your all that, and well, you'll see gravel and maybe a hospital bed or similar.. Take your time, I wish you the best.. and Congrats on a great inheritance, Big D.
 
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