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I am a new rider (very green) I’ve ridden a dirt bike a few times and put a couple hundred miles on a 200cc moped.
I keep hearing that 1200cc’s is too much bike for a beginner. I feel I am very responsible and precautious person by nature. I’m also taking the MSF course in a couple weeks.
You ‘guys got any advise/thought on this?
It is indeed a lot bike for a beginner but it has been done. Take the MSF course and then start super slow, suburban side streets on weekend mornings, etc. Look for the parking lot vids on youtube. Ride Like a Pro (Jerry Palladino) comes to mind. As for the bike, I would get to a baseline with new plugs and swapping out all the fluids and do a careful inspection of the tires and a spline lube. Depending on your money situation, take it to a dealer and have them do the once over. You'll need the dealership to replace the coolant anyway. These bikes can put you in the poorhouse pretty quick. Learn how to do the easy maintenance stuff yourself. Subscribe to BMW ON for 3d party parts places like beemerboneyard and EUMotoElectric to help you stay out of the dealership. Install some frame sliders.
 

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[QUOTE="azl, post: 284539, member: 39826" ]... I really didn't understand counter steering and leaning the bike ...
[/QUOTE]

THIS! Despite all my time on bicycles counter-steering is not something you have to think about, the bike itself is just too light to recognize that you are even doing it.

On lesson I took from the initial rider course back to bicycles was to TURN YOUR HEAD. Look where you want to go, don’t fixate, stay loose. (Works with skiing too). I remember coming into a turn that was sharper than I thought at over 40 mph. (On a 23mm tire wearing only spandex.) I could hear myself screaming inside my own head to TURN YOUR HEAD! and it worked. Unfortunately it also gave me confidence and made me gonzo descender. I can assure you, crashing a bicycle at any speed over 20 is gonna hurt. Over 35-40, in basically your underwear, will get you an ambulance ride or worse..

But the real x-factor (at least for me on motorcycles) is counter-steering. When you feel like you’ve overcooked a turn, stay calm, look where you wanna go, and PUSH hard with that inside hand. (Calm, turn, push. Repeat that I your head so it’s second nature) It’s almost magical!

The other most important skill is awareness. Assume no one sees you. Even when the seem to be looking right at you, assume they don’t see you. Be conscious of the other drivers blind spots and stay out of them. Pass trucks, do not ride next to one. Ever see a truck tire come apart? With oncoming traffic that looks like it might turn in front of you - cover the brakes and be prepared. Always know your outs. (These lessons are probably the most valuable once you have good bike control. These are identical in cycling, just in cycling your ability to ‘throttle out’ of a danger zone is much more limited.)

Riding requires more concentration than most things you do. To me, that’s part of the allure, I’m out there doing one thing (that I love) and you have to always be thinking, looking, scanning and there’s not a lot of bandwidth left over for other stuff so you block that out and just focus on the moment. About nailing that next curve, blipping the perfect downshift, just being ‘in the flow.’ And some days, it’s just not there. On those days, put the bike back in the garage and do something else.
 

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Discussion Starter #23
It is indeed a lot bike for a beginner but it has been done. Take the MSF course and then start super slow, suburban side streets on weekend mornings, etc. Look for the parking lot vids on youtube. Ride Like a Pro (Jerry Palladino) comes to mind. As for the bike, I would get to a baseline with new plugs and swapping out all the fluids and do a careful inspection of the tires and a spline lube. Depending on your money situation, take it to a dealer and have them do the once over. You'll need the dealership to replace the coolant anyway. These bikes can put you in the poorhouse pretty quick. Learn how to do the easy maintenance stuff yourself. Subscribe to BMW ON for 3d party parts places like beemerboneyard and EUMotoElectric to help you stay out of the dealership. Install some frame sliders.
I will definitely take heed to your advice.
Currently looking into frame sliders ..I’m not crazy about the look but I’d hate to destroy the bike if I drop it.
Thanks a lot.
 

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Discussion Starter #24
[QUOTE="azl, post: 284539, member: 39826" ]... I really didn't understand counter steering and leaning the bike ...
THIS! Despite all my time on bicycles counter-steering is not something you have to think about, the bike itself is just too light to recognize that you are even doing it.

On lesson I took from the initial rider course back to bicycles was to TURN YOUR HEAD. Look where you want to go, don’t fixate, stay loose. (Works with skiing too). I remember coming into a turn that was sharper than I thought at over 40 mph. (On a 23mm tire wearing only spandex.) I could hear myself screaming inside my own head to TURN YOUR HEAD! and it worked. Unfortunately it also gave me confidence and made me gonzo descender. I can assure you, crashing a bicycle at any speed over 20 is gonna hurt. Over 35-40, in basically your underwear, will get you an ambulance ride or worse..

But the real x-factor (at least for me on motorcycles) is counter-steering. When you feel like you’ve overcooked a turn, stay calm, look where you wanna go, and PUSH hard with that inside hand. (Calm, turn, push. Repeat that I your head so it’s second nature) It’s almost magical!

The other most important skill is awareness. Assume no one sees you. Even when the seem to be looking right at you, assume they don’t see you. Be conscious of the other drivers blind spots and stay out of them. Pass trucks, do not ride next to one. Ever see a truck tire come apart? With oncoming traffic that looks like it might turn in front of you - cover the brakes and be prepared. Always know your outs. (These lessons are probably the most valuable once you have good bike control. These are identical in cycling, just in cycling your ability to ‘throttle out’ of a danger zone is much more limited.)

Riding requires more concentration than most things you do. To me, that’s part of the allure, I’m out there doing one thing (that I love) and you have to always be thinking, looking, scanning and there’s not a lot of bandwidth left over for other stuff so you block that out and just focus on the moment. About nailing that next curve, blipping the perfect downshift, just being ‘in the flow.’ And some days, it’s just not there. On those days, put the bike back in the garage and do something else.
I’ve watched quite a few videos that ‘break down counter steering in very technical terms. The videos have been helpful but I’m learning that steering really is ‘all feel.
I don’t plan on hitting any turns at 40mph any time soon but I do appreciate your advise.
Thanks a lot
 
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