BMW K1200, K1300, and K1600 Forum banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
42 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I purchased Rhinewest's Cam Gear & Software set back in July (through Pirates Lair) for installation on my '97 BMW K1200RS. I'd planned to install it in the off-season, in conjunction with other preventive maintenance such as valve clearance checks, and finally got around to it the other day.

While the chip install went easily enough, it seems the cam gear installation may not be. I've included a couple of pictures to help explain the dilemna that's cropped up.

With the crankshaft and the camshafts (using the BMW alignment tool) at the TDC position, I get good tension (no slack) in the chain between the crank sprocket & original intake cam gear in place. This is consistent with the installation instructions in both the BMW and Clymer repair manuals.

When I try to install the Rhinewest intake cam gear however, for similar tension in the chain I cannot get the dowel pin to line up with the locating guide on the cam flange (see pics RW5 & RW6). The only way I'm able to get the cam gear to align and seat in the locating guide is by moving it by one tooth clockwise, which then results in a significant bit of slack in the chain (see pics RW7 & RW8).

Am I missing something or is it possible I received a bum intake gear? Comparing the original and the Rhinewest gears (by pin location), it appears there's about a half tooth-pitch overlap. Is this correct?

Do the gears alter advance (in addition, perhaps, to valve overlap) in which case trying to get the dowel to align with the crankshaft at TDC position is not possible? If this is the case, is the slack in the chain then explainable - but would have to be taken up (by rotating the crank counterclockwise sufficiently) before the exhaust cam gear is installed?

Anyone encountered this? :confused:
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
158 Posts
Check to make sure that the sprocket is not facing the wrong direction. I have not installed a set but yes you should have to rotate the two sprockets differently because they changed the overlap timing.
 

·
Looking for better limits...
Joined
·
5,163 Posts
I believe the outward-facing side of the cam has the "Intake" and Exhaust" (in German?) stamped/written on it. Also, keep in mind the cam kit provides more overlap between the the intake closing and the exhaust opening, providing more mid-range. So, yeah, you might have to rotate the camshaft a bit to get it lined-up. But, call Rhinewest for clarification, rather than trusting well-intentioned but experience-lacking riders on the internet :hypocrite



100% free webcam site! | Awesome chicks and it is absolutely free! | Watch free live sex cam - easy as 1-2-3
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
651 Posts
Razel said:
I believe the outward-facing side of the cam has the "Intake" and Exhaust" (in German?) stamped/written on it.
That would be "Einlass" and "Auslass", respectively. :teeth
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
651 Posts
macdonge said:
Do the gears alter advance (in addition, perhaps, to valve overlap) in which case trying to get the dowel to align with the crankshaft at TDC position is not possible?
It appears they do. What you will have to do then, is not to move the cam gear one tooth over, but twist the camshaft itself to make the pin line up. Reposition the gears properly, then twist the hex on the camshaft with a wrench.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
42 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Sorted out now

I've sorted this out through some discussion with Hank at Rhinewest. These guys were very prompt to respond to my query - which is a good thing! The thread is copied below for anyone interested. They could probably stand to revise their instructions to include the case where the cam chain has been off, e.g. to adjust valve clearances and/or replace the chain guide & tensioner wear strip, and highlight the fact that the BMW tool to secure the two camshafts at TDC can't be used.

The upshot is that the new gear serves to advance the intake cam (counter-clockwise) by abot a half tooth-pitch versus where the original cam gear would be at TDC.

Hope this helps those who opt for this conversion. It won't be 'til spring and the snow melts before I get to test it out though.

Glen
_____________________________________
That looks good!

Hank Arriazola
Rhine West Performance

Glen MacDonald wrote:
Hank: Here's a pic of how things look at TDC after following your instructions (i.e. exhaust cam gear first). It looks good to me - exhaust cam where it would normally be with intake cam slightly advanced. I rotated the crank through several revolutions afterward and everything seems fine (no binding).

What do you think?

Thanks,

Glen
----- Original Message -----
From: Glen MacDonald
To: [email protected]
Sent: Tuesday, December 12, 2006 7:20 PM
Subject: Re: K1200RS Cam Gear


OK... so when you say "with the triangle lining up with the seam", I'm assuming it will be oriented just as shown in the attached picture, that is:
With the point of the triangle just past the 12 o'clock (CCW or counterclockwise) and,
Once rotated sufficiently for the pin to drop, the groove in the camshaft oriented just past the 9 o'clock position (again, rotating CCW)
Meanwhile, the exhaust gear, when installed, should have the groove in the camshaft oriented right on the 9 o'clock position.

Correct?
----- Original Message -----
From: Hank Arriazola
To: Glen MacDonald
Sent: Tuesday, December 12, 2006 5:42 PM
Subject: Re: K1200RS Cam Gear


Your correct. The only thing I do different is that I install the cam gear on the exhaust cam first (with the chain), torque it and lock it down with the tool. Then I do the intake cam. Place the sprocket into chain with the triangle lining up the seam. The rotate the cam counter-clockwise until the pin drops into the slot. Torque and double check everything.
I normally don't remove the front cover, so this might make things a little more challenging.

sincerely

Hank Arriazola
Rhine West Performance

Glen MacDonald wrote:
I think I'm with you Hank. What you're saying then is, with the crank at TDC position and the exhaust cam fixed, install the intake cam gear with the chain under tension (as in
pic RW5 attached) and rotate the intake cam counter-clockwise until the pin
drops into the groove (pic RW ).

Presumably then I just install the exhaust cam gear ensuring there isn't any
excessive slack between it and the intake gear.

Correct?

Thanks Hank.

Glen
----- Original Message ----- From: "Hank Arriazola" <[email protected]>
To: <[email protected]>
Sent: Monday, December 11, 2006 12:39 PM
Subject: K1200RS Cam Gear



Hello Glen, if you can provide me with a phone number as it might be
easier to explain. One thing is that you can not use the BMW tool as your
going to advance the intake side. You might use the exhaust side to hold
the cam in place at TDC and slightly angle out of the way for the intake
cam. Line up the cam gear with the seams on the head. Then rotate the
intake cam to where the pin fall in to the cam grove. The grove will be
advance if compared to the exhaust cam.

Hope this helps, if not I can walk you through this over the phone.

I can be reached at 210-826-0014.

sincerely
Hank Arriazola
Rhine West Performance
 

Attachments

1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top