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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all just took a test ride on the K1200R and absolutely loved it. However I found the riding position placed to much pressure on my wrists, particularly with my wife on the back as she would slide toward me on braking. Anyone experience similar problems. I was going to test ride a K1200S but I think that bike may put even more weight to the wrists. Any comments or workarounds out there would be greatly appreciated.
:tim :tim
 

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bigkaz said:
Hi all just took a test ride on the K1200R and absolutely loved it. However I found the riding position placed to much pressure on my wrists, particularly with my wife on the back as she would slide toward me on braking. Anyone experience similar problems. I was going to test ride a K1200S but I think that bike may put even more weight to the wrists. Any comments or workarounds out there would be greatly appreciated.
:tim :tim
The KS will have more weight on the wrist. I rode both back-to-back and the KR is more upright. It's a great position for going real fast when you want to be seated that way.

You may not like the looks but if you want to sit upright and you plan on taking your wife you may want to take a good look at the GS. You'll be amazed at what a good overall bike it is. Very comfortable. I'm 52 years old and I find myself reaching for the GS keys more than any other bike only because I don't want to deal with the pain.
 

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The K1200R has a better seating position than the K1200S or the K1200RS. You could get Verholen bar risers to change the riding position.
 

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Upright R

Hi Kaz.
Take a look at my post..."Changed my R abit " on the K1200R Forum.
I had the same problem,, So I made the necessary changes to gain the comfort,but keep the power train

Slow2go
 

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Slow2go said:
Hi Kaz.
Take a look at my post..."Changed my R abit " on the K1200R Forum.
I had the same problem,, So I made the necessary changes to gain the comfort,but keep the power train

Slow2go
S2G - You're going to win me over on this...I just know it ;^)
 

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Bigkaz--When I originally took the K12R out for a test ride, I suffered the same, sore wrist, issue and decided the bike wasn't for me. After thinking about the test ride, I considered that I was riding the K12R like my 1150RT (straight up position with weight on my hips) and perhaps the K12R needed a different approach. It then occurred to me that the K12R is an entirely different bike/ride, something I was looking for, than the RT and required a different riding position. I purchased the K12R with that in mind and learned that riding it suspending my torso through my abdomen leaves no pressure on the wrists. When I apply the brakes and my body wants to move forward on the seat, additional pressure on the abdomen and locking knees on the tank keep me in place. If I don't do these 2 things when braking, my weight moves to the wrists and shoulder blades, both of which become sore quickly. So, in the end, if riding in the manner described makes sense, it's a great bike and a blast to ride. It's not a touring bike and doesn't ride like one (I kept my RT for that purpose). I hope this helps.
One additional thought.....I almost purchased the MV Handlebars (which allow you to sit more upright) ( http://www.mv-motorrad.de/cosmoshop/lshop,showdetail,8496,e,1137257094-8580,,901224,,,.htm ) when I purchased the bike. However, I decided to try the bike as-is and then consider the MV's. Once I figured out the best way to ride it, there was no reason to purchase the MV handle bars.
 

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I agree w/ Alan. I switched from a standard/cruiser-ish bike and initially found the pressure on my wrists to be bothersome. A friend pointed out that it looked like I was locking my elbows, and indeed I was. That transferred the entire weight of my upper body down to my wrists. After I started hunching forward a bit more, bending my elbows and using my back and abs to hold me up, I found that not only was there less pressure on my wrists, but that the vibration wasn't making my hands go numb either. It took a little getting used to initially but I find the seating position to be very comfortable now.
 

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Proper Riding Position

It's always better to ride for about 6 months/ 6K miles before looking for solutions as in bar backs or seat/peg adjustments. Proper riding position for a bike such as this (nakeds in general) is to keep the weight centered over the hip/pelvic joint, ankles and heels. The upper body remains relaxed and has no weight bearing responsibilities - it is for balance and body shifting. The lower body bears the weight. With experience, the body learns this and rides for hours without fatigue - especially in the arms, shoulders, and wrists. Long legged guys then might find a need to change the angle of hip, knee, ankle with a higher seat or lower pegs. Rarely are bar backs needed unless you are particularly short armed and the reach prevents your achieving this better body position.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thank you all for your comments, I will take another test ride and try some of your suggestions. I did test ride the R1200RT and found it to be extremely comfortable but I didn't like the boxer engine or the handling compared to the K1200R (although my wife preferred the RT for comfort and couldn't give two hoots about the handling and that beautifully silky smooth powerplant). Has anyone taken a pillion on this bike and if so did they find the seat to be uncomfortable, maybe an aftermarket seat that is more pillion friendly might be the answer.
 

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Wrist pain

Did the bike you rode have the sport screen on? I had the sport screen installed at the 600 mile service on my K121R and found the same problem but I never notice it before. I think if the little fly screen is left on and you get the air blast to hold you up it makes a difference. My sport screen came off, I get a cleaner air flow and less wrist pain.
 

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camfarm said:
It's always better to ride for about 6 months/ 6K miles before looking for solutions as in bar backs or seat/peg adjustments. Proper riding position for a bike such as this (nakeds in general) is to keep the weight centered over the hip/pelvic joint, ankles and heels. The upper body remains relaxed and has no weight bearing responsibilities - it is for balance and body shifting. The lower body bears the weight. With experience, the body learns this and rides for hours without fatigue - especially in the arms, shoulders, and wrists. Long legged guys then might find a need to change the angle of hip, knee, ankle with a higher seat or lower pegs. Rarely are bar backs needed unless you are particularly short armed and the reach prevents your achieving this better body position.

I agree with the time frame. It took me some months to start becoming "one" with my K-bike. I am glad I was patient and didn't change anything. The design was well thought out, it just takes getting used to....riding outside the box, for me. Check out the archives for great info. Search for 'riding articles' or 'riding techniques'. Also an essential essay by the aptly nicknamed 'Master Yoda'. A good book'Total Control' by Lee Parks, also 'Smooth Riding, the Pridmore Way' by....uh, Pridmore! Cheers and be patient Luke Skywalker.
 

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Compared to the Rockster

:)

I am thinking of trading in my 2004 Rockster for a 2005 K1200R,

Am I safe to assume that the riding position on the K1200R would be
a big change than that of my Rockster?

Cheers!

Denis

:tim
 

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I am thinking of trading in my 2004 Rockster for a 2005 K1200R,
Me too, probably in March. I can't get a test ride, but sat on one with a centerstand for quite a while. I didn't think the ergos were that much more aggressive than the Rock.

Bill
 

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KidKR said:
:)

I am thinking of trading in my 2004 Rockster for a 2005 K1200R,

Am I safe to assume that the riding position on the K1200R would be
a big change than that of my Rockster?

Cheers!

Denis

:tim
I had a Rockster and now have a K1200R. The Rockster's bars are wider and are more of a struggle at freeway speeds. The pegs on the KR are a little more rear set but this is OK since I thought that the Rockster was too far forward.

Beleive it or not the KR feels more narrow at the knees. The front end on the Rockster will steer lighter since there is no damper. The suspension is much more compliant on the KR. It's easier to get a blend of comfort and control.

My 2 cents.
 

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bigkaz said:
Hi all just took a test ride on the K1200R and absolutely loved it. However I found the riding position placed to much pressure on my wrists, particularly with my wife on the back as she would slide toward me on braking. Anyone experience similar problems. I was going to test ride a K1200S but I think that bike may put even more weight to the wrists. Any comments or workarounds out there would be greatly appreciated.
:tim :tim
Nancy and I ride Wolfgang two-up a lot and we're not timid about pace ;).

The riding position on the stock K-R is going to be more upright than the stock K-S. Of course there are aftermarket (Verholen) bar risers that can get you more upright in either case. Note: I'm 6'4 and very "long waisted", even had back trouble in the past, the position is comfortable now that I've been riding for awhile (6,000 miles) and I wouldn't consider the bar raisers.

The pressure on the wrists you feel should go away with a combination of 3 things:
1- You get comfortable with the speeds and let it run at 80+ mph when cruising. The wind on your chest will take virtually all of the weight off your arms.
2- Use your knees to grip the bike when braking and use them to hold you upright during the stops and relax your arms/wrists.
3- Also, when you get used to the "pull" under hard acceleration you'll relax your grip and lower the stress on your forearms, wrists and hands.

Under moderate "slow and go" (city traffic), Nancy will put one hand forward on the tank and one hand on the grab rail. This allows her to take most of the forward momentum and be ready for moderate acceleration.

When we are "on it", she puts both arms around me and under braking will put both hands forward on the tank. The as we go into the turn, the arms go back to around the waist. She enjoys the "participation" and truly enjoys the ride.

All in all, the K-R is a [email protected]$!&$& BLAST for us to ride, BUT when we want to go a distance greater than 100 miles one way, we take the LT. When I ride solo, I take the K-R up to about 400 miles in a day.... when I get a custom saddle might go up to 600. The LT two-up is good for 1000 miles a day, solo even more.

Good luck with your choice.


.
 

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Love the R solo, hate it with my wife on the back. Driver seat is very long and she seams to be sitting in it with me most of the time. Don't mind it, but not too comfortable.
 

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Thanks!

Thanks guys for all your info and advice!

I am leaning towards the K1200R.

My other option is the new R1200S coming out in April.

My local Montreal BMW dealer has quoted me a price for the new R1200S
with all options and without.
Needless to say it is much more expensive than the 2005 K1200R they
currently have in stock.

Plus because it is slighlty used, only 1200Kms on it.
The original owner paid for the ESA option and the 190 rear wheel.
Only thing is, I would like to get the bigger windscreen for it, compared to the
tiny one that is on there now.

Also what about luggage?
Do any of you have the standard BMW bags for it and how much are they?

All info received, always appreciated.

Cheers!

:ricky
 

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I though the S was more comfortable. I found that the seat on the R was less flat than the S and made me put more weight on my hands.. just me.. guess I'm strange
 

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KidKR said:
Also what about luggage?
Do any of you have the standard BMW bags for it and how much are they?
The BMW bags are pretty good. I commute daily and the bags are large enough for me to secure my Schuberth S1 and my foul weather gear without any problem. The compressing straps are a nice feature. I guess you can ride with the bags fully filled out, though I'd be worried about them coming apart at speed. They're not watertight, but overall provide a good deal of protection. I think the bag liners that come with them are waterproof and will keep your stuff dry.

I know hepco-becker makes a rack and bag set, but IMHO, the BMW bags are far and away better looking and more functional.

Looks like USD $600 will get you the bags. Then you've got to pay for the locks, bracket and screws (!?).
http://ascycles.com/detail.aspx?ID=39119
 
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