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Just saying hey
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Both of my oilhead GS's were easy to flop up on the centerstand. My GT and airhead GS, not so much. Obviously, it's about geometry and leverage.

The GT was a pretty good hoist but do-able, before I got the Park-and-Move gadget. Now with the PM's additional height, it's close to a gut-buster to heave the beast up.

So, I was thinking that cutting a 15 mm section out of the centerstand leg length would reduce the effort involved. The rear wheel would likely still clear the ground - even if it touched, there'd still be plenty of weight on the centerstand to maintain stability. The effective point of ground contact would be moved rearward a little closer to the centerstand pivot's plumb line, but the legs' angle forward would be the same so I don't think there'd be much increase in the risk of the bike falling forward off the stand.

Another idea is to rig a length of nylon ribbon with a cross-handle to the existing grab bar. That would allow a more erect posture when heaving rather than the hunched-over position that the reach to the stock handle requires.

Any thoughts?
 

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no power in the 'verse can stop me
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You can't possibly be serious :yeow:

Besides getting one of these up on the centerstand is
more about pushing down with the foot rather than lifting
the whole bike
 

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Well if that's what you want to do, an LT centerstand is about 1/2"-3/4" shorter than a RS/GT centerstand.
 

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I assume that this park and move gadget sits on your garage floor?

If you shorten your centrestand what happens when you are on the road and need to change the rear wheel (flat tyre?), will there be enough clearance to remove the wheel/tyre?

Perhaps more practise with the technique and less time with the gas axe (oxy)!
 

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Its all in the way you put your weight on the stand.....IM about 160....if i put my whole body weight on the stand.....the grab rail is just more for guiding.....and if you put the bike in "N" its a lot easier because the rear tire isnt scuffing on the way up
 

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It took me a little practice to learn it's all about rolling your foot over the stand sticky out bit, whilst just teasing the bike back on the grip in a single push with the foot and pull (right hand on the seat grab as BAK04GT says). I regularly I park up on a slight up slope which helps.

However, when I tried this once with a slight down gradient, it was a lot harder.

We are lucky to have a center stand, access to the underbelly cover and bits would be more difficult if you lowered it. One day the engine/tranni will need to come out of the frame and you'll appreciate the space underneath for the floor jack and wood blocks.



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Won't a shorter center stand increase the effort. Shorter fulcrum??
 

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Navy_F4 said:
So, I was thinking that cutting a 15 mm section out of the centerstand leg length would reduce the effort involved. The rear wheel would likely still clear the ground - even if it touched, there'd still be plenty of weight on the centerstand to maintain stability. The effective point of ground contact would be moved rearward a little closer to the centerstand pivot's plumb line, but the legs' angle forward would be the same so I don't think there'd be much increase in the risk of the bike falling forward off the stand.

Another idea is to rig a length of nylon ribbon with a cross-handle to the existing grab bar. That would allow a more erect posture when heaving rather than the hunched-over position that the reach to the stock handle requires.

Any thoughts?
Would it not be easier to roll the bike onto two pads of 15mm thick plywood (One under each wheel) and then place the mover thing under the stand?
Might need an additional pad under the sidestand when positioning the mover.
 

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Shorten

Don't go too short in case your off the side of the road and need the tire off the ground. The berm may be soft and there is a sinking factor which could leave the tire still on the ground. It's officially called sinkage, not to be confused with shrinkage.............which is altogether different. :teeth
BTW- there's a pull handle? :wtf: I grab mine under the side-bag rail. My buddy has a '91 ST1100 and they have a nice spring loaded handle to hoist with. It's really nice feature but at least we have cruise control :thumb: he-he
 

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I've never considered such a thing. If every parking space was perfectly level it would be a great idea. You may want to just take the thing off completely before you go to all the trouble of shortening it.
 

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No, don't do it

I do not recommend it. It would then create a real stability problem when you want to lift the FRONT wheel off the ground with a front fork stand for tire changes, etc. The back wheel is going to then touch the ground, leaving the centerstand out of the equation, thus creating a tipover situation for the bike. You cannot balance a bike on a front fork stand and the rear wheel. I believe you will regret having shortened your centerstand. I would not even think about shortening mine. If you did, you would most likely have to use a section of a 2 X 6 to put the centerstand on before lifting the bike and subsequently lifiting the front with your Pitbull / whatever kind you have front stand.
 
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